Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$2.77
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by wmboothsbookssf
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used Good Book. Book shows normal shelf wear and clean pages. NF
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Indian Tales

4.4 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews


The Battle of the Vegetables
The Battle of the Vegetables
Leeks who believe a cow is one of Santa’s reindeer, carrots who accept an invitation to a party given by rabbits, and a leek and carrot couple whose romance precipitates total vegetable warfare are the hapless protagonists in these satiric, snarky stories. Hardcover

Editorial Reviews

Review

Part folklore, part cultural tour, this collection of eight folktales begins with a short, enthusiastic
introduction to India s diverse history, people, and landscape. The stories have been drawn from distinct
areas of India from Punjab in the north to Tamil Nadu in the south. Prior to each story, a two-page
description of the region provides a smattering of information on customs, clothing, traditions, and
celebrations, some of which play a role in the tale that follows. No sources are given, but each story has
the tight structure, a well-honed pace, and a distinctive, authentic folklore flavor. Bright, colorful, simple
illustrations pick up story elements, frame the narrative, and parade throughout the pages. Filled with East
Indian customs and flavors, magic and secrets, and brave and silly characters, this savory collection is well
suited for independent reading, reading aloud, and multicultural studies.

--Booklist, November 15, 2007

This anthology presents eight fluid retellings of folktales from different Indian states...An introduction offers a brief overview of the country's history, from Indus Valley civilization to the Mughal dynasties, concluding with a paragraph about modern India. Each folktale is preceded by a note with facts about the state from which it originated, including explanations of festivals or terms that appear in the text. Illustrations and page borders support the texts perfectly as the folk-style paintings reflect colors of rural life.

The collection provides a good introduction to Indian folklore and could be enjoyed as a read-aloud by younger children, while students in the intermediate grades can enjoy them independently." --School Library Journal
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Barefoot Books (September 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846860830
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846860836
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 9.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #970,643 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
First the text - the stories are a nice selection - some of them I hadn't heard before. The ones I knew from before, I was dissatified. For example, the important part of Nala and Damayanti story is that Nala's face gets burnt and Damayanti still recognized him. That part is totally missing. The word Rakshasa/Asura (can't remember which one is used) is misused as a proper noun or name. In reality, it just means demon.

However my biggest complaint is with the illustrations. I found them bordering on being offensive and not adding to the story. What is with the color stick noses? The faces seem like a bad attempt at caricature art. And then most stories have only a border of illustrations. Which means unless you know what you are looking for, the illustrations don't sequentially help you with the story. Especially with a different ancient cultural background these stories are from, illustrations could have told the story so beautifully. Instead you are left looking at some colorful pages. I showed it to a few other Indians and they found the illustrations offensive as well.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My daughter found the book " Indian Tales" in the local library and wanted to read.We were in for a treat. The author Shenaaz Nanji is a great story teller, together with Christopher Corr, who did the illustration wonderfully with beautiful colors representing Indian art and culture and they do depict the story as well along with the author.

Every story comes from a different region of India along with some information about the region, a good way to learn about India,even if you come from India. The author's style of writing is so beautiful which is different from many other books, that you may have read before, reminded me the way the stories are narrated by parents to their kids in a colorful way, bringing life to the story and to keep the kids interested and takes them to an imaginary world. My daughter likes art and she loved the pictures and wanted to practice, looking at it. I am planning to order this book and also buy more copies to give as a gift.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Book Review

Title: Indian Tales
Author: Shenaaz Nanji
Illustrator: Christopher Corr
Publisher: Barefoot Books
ISBN: 978-1-84686-083-6
Review By: Diana Rohini LaVigne, Indian Life & Style Magazine

Vibrant. Alluring. Brilliant. Indian Tales by Shenaaz Nanji and illustrated by Christopher Corr is a phenomenal collection of daily life stories from different regions of India. Each section takes on the personality of the region and brings forward the colors and imagery from that region's lifestyle and legends.

Together the collection of stories weave a beautifully written work of art that will delight children and adults alike. From the tale of the young drummer boy named Gopal to the royal narrative about the princess Damayanti, Indian Tales delivers a book filled with information, poetry and culturally-rich images that promise to enchant adolescent readers.

It is a book that begs to be read and reread over and over again. Nanji does a superior job winning the interest of readers and keeping them coming back from more. Readers will explore deeper into the regions with each read and images will continue to reinforce the information learned. Indian Tales is an important piece of cultural literature and should be on the top of wish lists for schools and libraries around the global.
Comment 6 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This collection of tales is beautifully illustrated and brimming with rich Indian culture. Each tale is taken from a different region of the Indian sub-continent and the stories are preceeded by fun and insightful information about these regions. The stories, which are read over and over in our home, are full of mythical creatures and the magic of ancient India and make for wonderful bedtime reading! Definitely a must have for your child's bookshelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 5th grade daughter was doing a report/presentation on India for a World Culture's Fair. I bought her this book to go along with her project as I always make sure to include folk tales when we study another culture.

The illustrations are lovely and I like the fact that tales from different regions of India are included. She was thrilled with the book and I am glad that she gets to keep in rather than return it to the library.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse