Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $6.70 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -usedbooks123-
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good Some wear on book from reading, we guarantee all purchases
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans Hardcover – March 15, 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.25
$20.22 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans + Engaged Resistance: American Indian Art, Literature, and Film from Alcatraz to the NMAI (The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere)
Price for both: $44.59

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (March 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813549655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813549651
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,179,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is the United States of Native America at its best! Owings brilliantly weaves together the grassroots narratives and heart-felt stories that she gathered in her travels throughout Indian Country. The result is a stunning and eye-opening book, written in page-turning prose, that reveals the emotions, pains, and humor of Native Americans. Whether you know nothing about Indians or just want to know more, you need to read this book!"
(Donald L. Fixico (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Muscogee Creek, and Seminole) Professor of History, Arizona State University)

"Alison Owings is a brilliant listener. Otherwise she wouldn't have been able to interview so many native people and have them talk about their lives, their dreams, their accomplishments with such intimacy."
(Jake Page author of In the Hands of the Great Spirit)

"Vital voices from Indigenous peoples have long been shrouded, interpreted, misinterpreted, or just plain ignored. Owings's humanity and journalistic instincts lead us where few non-Natives have ventured. Truly a must read."
(Jackie Old Coyote (Apsaalooke) The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development)

"I loved Indian Voices. And it was great fun to read because it is about real people in contemporary times."
(Jacqueline Johnson-Pata (Tlingit) Executive Director, Congress of American Indians)

"Owings assembles interviews with Native Americans from across the nation that achieve a remarkable level of intimacy. Her descriptions are rich in detail, her stories and statistics captivating. This engrossing, affecting book should be mandatory reading in American history classes.."
(Publishers Weekly (starred review) 2011-05-23)

"Alison Owings does an outstanding job of just what this book promises to address in the title, Listening to Native Americans. Owings is
a recognized journalist, and her work as an oral historian observing, listening, and sometimes participating in day-to-day American Indian life makes this book a welcome and must-read addition to the small number of books that focus on contemporary American Indians."
(American Indian Quarterly 2012-07-01)

"An important (and entertaining!) new book on Native Americans that lets the real experts do the talking."
(Indian Country Today 2011-04-20)

"Occasionally startling, often humorous, and always thought-provoking. A captivating book about contemporary Native American life."

(San Jose Mercury News 2011-04-28)

"Owings' writing can be summed up in one word: entralling. Her vivid prose brings the scenes and stories to life in detail."
(Bismark Tribune 2011-06-26)

"This is a model of what a good oral history book should be. Owings tells our stories honestly, eloquently and without her own baggage, and our people’s stories don’t pull many punches either. Survivance shines through in every chapter."
(John D. Berry American Indian Library Association 2011-07-01)

"Owings is a good writer and an even better listener. She manages to present the stories told by real-life Natives/Indians/Tribal People with attention to detail and as accurately as a person outside the culture probably could. She brings her own perspective to the stories and although these asides may make many Natives/Indians smile in all-too familiar recognition of encounters with non-Natives, they also help to illustrate the uniqueness of Native/Tribal culture. This book is an excellent addition to the ongoing conversation between Natives and non-Natives and it also enhances mutual understanding among the Peoples of this country."
(Native Peoples Law Caucus Newsletter 2011-08-01)

"Owings' chronicle is enlightening for all who wish to understand 'Where is Native America now?'"
(Booklist 2011-04-01)

"Many years of interviews and research have resulted in this book, an (Choice 2012-01-01)


"A rich collection that is poignant, funny, heartbreaking, and very real. The vast diversity in Native America is evident. The book is engaging and thoughtfully conceived and effectively communicates Owings’s central thesis—that Native Americans are alive, well, and thriving and have much to teach and share with the rest of us. Recommended for all readers of nonfiction, and highly recommended for anyone living in or near Native communities."
(Library Journal 2011-06-15)

About the Author

ALISON OWINGS is the author of Frauen: German Women Recall the Third Reich, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (Rutgers University Press) and Hey, Waitress!: The USA from the Other Side of the Tray.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
I highly recommend this valuable book.
Lynn E. Ponton
I learned so much about the ongoing struggles and hard-won successes of Native Americans in our country today.
Constant Reader
I enjoyed reading Indian Voices and felt that Ms. Owings did a good job in her interviews.
Marvin Call

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Annegret Ogden on May 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
A Must Read for the Me-generaton, these interviews tell us about how to survive against the odds. An expert story-teller herself, Alison Owings brings out the traditional flair for narration in each voice. Refreshingly frank about her initial "Euro-American ignoroance," she has gathered a lot of intriguing,sometimes shocking information in these revealing,often witty interviews. I found Patti Talahonga's description of a traditional Hopi birth especially moving, where the entire family takes care of mother and child, from birth at home to the naming ceremony which brings maybe fifty relatives who each give the baby a name and offers a prayer. Every narrator reflects a respect for family ties and for sharing resources with the wider community, even beyond, with all creatures. At the same time we learn about family hardships, resulting problems of a suppressed minority. Yet I found no finger-pointing in this complex, even contradictory American-Indian way of life. Instead I learned about the art of negotiating, of forming allegiances, and about conserving resources and traditions while being open to change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Diana O'Hehir on April 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Alison Owings really listens and then brings her most exciting and telling details back to us, so that we are with her on the scene and participate in the small and large details of the Indian life she sees. I am always interested in what happens to women in any society; that information is here, both small and large; we learn about an Indian girl in a cold, muddy Alaska,about one in a our hot and muggy South. And about the many grown Indian women who are helping to run things throughout our country.

And about their husbands and partners with whom they work.

Throughout Owings' narrative the voices are individual and compelling. I picked up this book thinking that it would be "good for me," to my surprise I found it a page-turner, one I really didn't want to put down.

The book is beautifully informative and also, thank goodness, beautifully interesting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Milton Moskowitz on April 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Alison Owings makes a substantial contribution to our understanding of American society through her new book, Indian Voices. By taking a tape recorder to reservations, cities and towns where American Indians live and work, she presents, a la Studs Terkel, a riveting portrait of the people who occupied the United States before the arrival of Christophr Columbus and the Pilgrims. They are still here today, proud of their heritage and, interestingly, proud to call themselves American. The best way to know what they are thinking and feeling is to ask them. That's what Owings did --- and we, the readers, are the beneficiaries of her pionering work.

Milton Moskowitz
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Constant Reader on April 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought Alison Owings's "Indian Voices" because I'm a fan of her earlier oral histories on German women in the Third Reich and on American waitresses. I'm so glad I did. It's wonderful. I learned so much about the ongoing struggles and hard-won successes of Native Americans in our country today. In fact, I realized that I had known next to nothing. Have you heard of the Lumbees of North Carolina? They're still fighting for official recognition. (Read Chapter 3.)

Owings has a strong background in journalism so she is able to enlarge the usual scope of oral history in a fresh way. She includes her own voice unobtrusively in each interview to set the scene and tell us what people look like, and to report on some important historic events so the reader can situate the person within his or her tribal identity even when the specific heritage is mixed, as it often is. As she tools up and down the states pursuing her quarry, I felt that I was riding right along with her, entering people's homes and workplaces on and off "the rez," sharing meals, sorrows, achievements, and even some good laughter.

Overcoming family alcoholism and domestic violence are a part of the current story, but so is a profound respect for Indian traditions and ceremonies that have become part of the healing amid the sadness that so many Native languages are in danger of being lost. "Indian Voices" is an eye-opening book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gary T. Johnson on June 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The other reviewers articulate well how surprising and informative the Native American voices are in this fine example of oral history, but there is an additional reason to read this book. At some point the reader also realizes how little he or she knows about America in general. We all have vast gaps in our contact with other parts of our own country. The voices in the book come from across the country, many from rural areas. They share many of the joys and many of the challenges that other Americans face. In the end, however, we return to the color, the complexity, and the ironies of Native American life. Great job.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Clog Dancer on April 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Full disclosure: My real name isn't Clog Dancer. It's Cyra McFadden and Alison Owings is a friend. She's also a fine writer whose previous books, like this one, set out to introduce readers to people whose voices aren't often heard. This time her subject is contemporary American Indian lives and her range of interview subjects astonishing. They're young and old, prosperous and poor. They live urban lives in big cities and traditional lives on remote reservations. Their voices are eloquent, frequently funny and always surprising, and it's apparent that they've trusted Alison as an interviewer because she's respectful and open-hearted. This book's first sentence is "Let me start with my own ignorance." It did a lot to dispel mine while being a great pleasure to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews