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Indian Women and French Men: Rethinking Cultural Encounter in the Western Great Lakes (Native Americans of the Northeast: Culture, History, & the Contemporary) Hardcover – November 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Native Americans of the Northeast: Culture, History, & the Contemporary
  • Hardcover: 234 pages
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (November 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558493085
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558493087
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,488,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is groundbreaking work - a major contribution to the history of both Native Americans and women in this region. The book will become required reading for any course that focuses on the role of mixed bloods or Native Americans in the western Great Lakes and Mississippi." - R. David Edmunds, coauthor of The Fox Wars: The Mesquakie Challenge to New France"

About the Author

SUSAN SLEEPER-SMITH is assistant professor of history at Michigan State University and coeditor of New Faces of the Fur Trade: Selected Papers of the Seventh North American Fur Trade Conference.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jessica on April 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
The title of the book is a little misleading, because what you really get is a history of the fur trade in the southern Great Lakes: Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana. It also does a great job demonstrating how kin relations, both literal and fictive, created communities and networks that allowed the fur trade to thrive. If you know anything about how the fur trade in Canada operates, this book is a must have, as the fur trade in the southern Great Lakes was drastically different, as Sleeper-Smith demonstrates. In a large part this was due to the role of women, as is demonstrated in the book.
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery Mingo on August 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is not a cute recounting of Sacajawea and her French husband. This is not Pocahontas and John Smith with a Parisian accent. You can tell that the author is a historian's historian. She is writing for an audience of scholars on Native Americans. She looks at four examples taking place in the Midwest during the 1700s and 1800s to talk of how intermarriage and miscegenation played a role in European exploration, domination, and trade. You have to be well-versed in Native American studies and Midwestern history in order to understand this text. I hope the author gets tenure because this was a truly erudite text. Unsophisticated readers, be warned!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ken S. on December 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author is too interested in rewriting history to meet a feminist agenda. Instead of sticking to what is known and proven to have happened, she inserts her own opinion and fantasies of what she thinks (wishes) had happened. Which is sad because colonial Indian women who married into the French fur trading society were by-and-large interesting and independent in their own right without having Anglo feminist professors invent stuff about them.
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