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  • Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Spanish Language Special Edition)
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Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Spanish Language Special Edition)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Paramount
  • DVD Release Date: May 20, 2008
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (344 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0015U0QYE
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #97,234 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The second of the George Lucas/Steven Spielberg Indiana Jones epics is set a year or so before the events in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1984). After a brief brouhaha involving a precious vial and a wild ride down a raging Himalyan river, Indy (Harrison Ford) gets down to the problem at hand: retrieving a precious gem and several kidnapped young boys on behalf of a remote East Indian village. His companions this time around include a dimbulbed, easily frightened nightclub chanteuse (Kate Capshaw), and a feisty 12-year-old kid named Short Round (Quan Ke Huy). Throughout, the plot takes second place to the thrills, which include a harrowing rollercoaster ride in an abandoned mineshaft and Indy's rescue of the heroine from a ritual sacrifice. There are also a couple of cute references to Raiders of the Lost Ark, notably a funny variation of Indy's shooting of the Sherpa warrior.

Customer Reviews

The good: Its a Indy flick, Lots of satisfying action, great special effects, good story.
Ian
Though Temple of Doom isn't as good as Raiders or Last Crusade it is highly recommended and is one of the best adventure films ever made.
Sandy Rigas
Second, the ending of Part one where all the 'bad guys' suddenly become wiped out was just too much.
King Dimholt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By tetsuojin on January 2, 2012
Format: DVD
IMHO, I acknowledge only two Indiana Jones movies worthy of greatness: the Original Raiders movie and this, the Temple of Doom. The other two Indy films: Last Crusade and Kingdom of the Crystal Skull are poorly paced, contrived, tired, simplistic and very derivative. I know many people disagree with this assessment, but hold Temple of Doom against the other two movies, and you will see the weaknesses: thin plotlines, poor action sequences, tired pacing and inferior storytelling. The last two movies that simply don't measure up to the first two.

TOD is definitely the darkest of the Indy films; watching the adventure unfold, you are literally lowered into the pits of hell, in the face of true evil and darkness, with one of the strongest villains in film history. This very movie created the PG-13 rating category, which says alot about the level of horror portrayed. Like Raiders, TOD is a fast paced adventure rocket ride that features superb photography, exotic locations, a wonderful new original musical score by John Williams and rip roaring action sequences that stand as textbook examples on how to expertly film an action movie. The various action sequences have a natural flow to them that are physically credible, well sequenced and exciting. Short Round and Willie Scott are Indy's companions in this sequel, and both add sporadic necessary humor and lightheartedness to break up and balance off the extremely dark and nightmarish sequences. Despite Spielberg's personal opinion about TOD not being his favorite Indy movie, I consider this film one of Spielberg's greatest film achievements. From beginning to the end, you are on the edge of your seat. This is pure adventure in the spirit of the old movie serials.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Roman on December 24, 2011
Format: DVD
This has been my favorite of the Indiana Jones movies since I was a child, and it continues to be so. The visual splendor is amazing. From the streets to Shanghai to the forbidding Indian Palace... it's all very surreal. The soundtrack has all of the charm from Raiders with new, more intense, and emotional themes. A great adventure from start to finish.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 10, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
"Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" is a great departure from the first Indy movie. While still being filled with over-the-top acting, effects, and stunts, the violence is much more intense. This was the movie that caused the MPAA to create the "PG-13" rating.
That's not to say that the story shouldn't be viewed by most kids. Like anything else, it should be viewed first by the parents who should make the final decision. The strong violence, most of which is still in the comic-book style of "Raiders," goes down a darker road with much of it being directed at the children who are victims of the evil in this story. The most intense scene though (when a human heart is literally dug by hand out of a man's chest who sacrifices himself to the Hindu god Kali) is completely impossible but one that must be explained to the innocent mind of children.
Despite the extreme script, it's still a Spielberg, Lucas creation that's filled with imaginative images and a more fulfilling end to this chapter of the globe-trotting, two-fisted archaeologist Indiana Jones, played again wonderfully by Harrison Ford.
This is a must see for anyone who loves action/adventure stories and yes, it even has a little romance thrown in too (thanks to Kate Capshaw, the current Mrs. Spielberg).
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kristy M. Ross on January 23, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
The most underrated film of the franchise, INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM is actually superior in terms of action than LAST CRUSADE. Technically a prequel, the film is much darker in tone than it's predecessor, but nonetheless is an exciting entry in the Indiana Jones Trilogy. Night club action, mine car chases and the thrilling climax on a perilous rope bridge, the set-pieces are some of the most memorable in the trilogy. Set before RAIDERS, Harrison Ford is great in one of his best movie roles, Indiana Jones, obtainer of rare antiquities. And this time, it's Shankara stones for the looting, and while the story isn't as original as it's predecessor, it provides some great comic book-style action. Although directed by Spielberg, George Lucas is the creator of Indiana Jones, and this is one of Spielberg's most impersonal films. However there are some nice homages to JAWS and the "Just shoot 'em" gag from RAIDERS. The opening Busby Berkley inspired number "Anything Goes" sums up the pace for the whole film, where the characters go from one action set-piece to the next, with little space for a breather. The female lead Kate Kapshaw (Willie Scott) is not as spunky as Marion Ravenwood, but she's handles being a love interest for Indy and comic relief rather well. There is a notable lack of meaty villians, with Mola Ram not reaching the excellent "Bad guy" heights of Belloq, but hey, he's still nasty enough. Determined not to make Indy a cardboard character, this one explores Indy's dark side and audience limitations. However despite the change in tone for TOD, there are many laughs to be had and some clever in-jokes, the best of which is the nightclub where Willie sings: Club Obi Wan. Genius.Read more ›
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