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Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole/Joe Pike Series) Audio, Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook


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Product Details

  • Series: Elvis Cole/Joe Pike Series (Book 7)
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Abridged edition (September 28, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587880970
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587880971
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (260 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,110,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Readers who complain that there's too much wisecracking and cute icon worship in Robert Crais's books about Los Angeles private eye Elvis Cole will be glad to find these traits downplayed (but not totally disappeared) in this story about Cole's search for a missing printer whose specialty is funny money. The book is centered by the presence of the printer's three children--especially the motherly 15-year-old Teri and the obnoxious 12-year-old Charles--who hire Elvis from the phone book. Cole, hoping to become the stepfather of the son of his own lady love, gets sucked in by the children's combination of need and family unity, and soon finds himself in the middle of a shooting war between Russian gangsters, Vietnamese patriots, and ambiguous Federal agents. Previous Elvis outings in paperback: Sunset Express, Free Fall, Lullaby Town, The Monkey's Raincoat, Stalking the Angel, Voodoo River. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Having made it big with his last Elvis Cole mystery (Sunset Express, Hyperion, 1996), Crais here puts Cole on the track of a missing father who seems to have criminal connections.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Robert Crais is the author of the best-selling Elvis Cole novels. He was the 2006 recipient of the Ross Macdonald Literary Award.

A native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, he grew up on the banks of the Mississippi River in a blue collar family of oil refinery workers and four generations of police officers. He purchased a second-hand paperback of Raymond Chandler's The Little Sister when he was fifteen, which inspired his lifelong love of writing, Los Angeles, and the literature of crime fiction.

He journeyed to Hollywood in 1976 where he quickly found work writing scripts for such major television series as Hill Street Blues, Cagney & Lacey, and Miami Vice, as well as scripting numerous series pilots and movies-of-the-week for the major networks.

Feeling constrained by the collaborative working requirements of Hollywood, Crais resigned from a lucrative position as a contract writer and television producer in order to pursue his lifelong dream of becoming a novelist. His first efforts proved unsuccessful, but upon the death of his father in 1985, Crais was inspired to create Elvis Cole, using elements of his own life as the basis of the story. The resulting novel, The Monkey's Raincoat, won the Anthony and Macavity Awards and was nominated for the Edgar Award. It has since been selected as one of the 100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association.

Crais conceived of the novel as a stand-alone, but realized that, in Elvis Cole, he had created an ideal and powerful character through which to comment upon his life and times. Elvis Cole's readership skyrocketed in 1999 upon the publication of L. A. Requiem, which was a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller and forever changed the way Crais conceived of and structured his novels. Larger and deeper in scope, Publishers Weekly wrote of L. A. Requiem, "Crais has stretched himself the way another Southern California writer, Ross Macdonald, always tried to do, to write a mystery novel with a solid literary base." Booklist added, "This is an extraordinary crime novel that should not be pigeonholed by genre. The best books always land outside preset boundaries. A wonderful experience."

Crais followed with his first non-series novel, Demolition Angel, which was published in 2000 and featured former Los Angeles Police Department Bomb Technician Carol Starkey. In 2001, Crais published his second non-series novel, Hostage, which was named a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times and was a world-wide bestseller. The editors of Amazon.com selected Hostage as the #1 thriller of the year. A film adaptation of Hostage was released in 2005, starring Bruce Willis as ex-LAPD SWAT negotiator Jeff Talley.

Robert Crais lives in the Santa Monica mountains with his wife, three cats, and many thousands of books. Additional information can be found at his website, www.robertcrais.com.

Customer Reviews

Good story with good characters.
Sharon DeMier
The plot twist at the end might have been a tad too much, but it was forgivable given all that went on before.
Loren w Christensen
Their very fast reading and entertaining.
James D Galvin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 57 people found the following review helpful By mrliteral VINE VOICE on February 21, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
For me, the mystery of Indigo Slam is why it was out of print for years. Originally published in 1997, it didn't come out in paperback till 2003 (and the hardcover disappeared), while other later Crais novels (including another Cole book) did the usual hardcover-to-paperback cycle and remained on the shelves. Whatever the reason, it's here now and it's really good.
Elvis Cole, self-proclaimed World's Greatest Detective, is hired by three children to find their father. Motivated more by conscience than money, he helps them. When it turns out that the father is on the run from the Russian mob, Elvis starts getting in over his head. Fortunately, there is his laconic partner Pike to watch his back.
Mystery fans will see a certain similarity between the Cole books and Robert Parker's Spenser. Both feature wise-cracking tough private eyes with mysterious but generally good-hearted partners. Unfortunately, over the years, I found Spenser getting unlikably smug and self-righteous, while Cole remains a pleasure to read about. And both Cole and Pike are much more well-developed than either Spenser or Hawk, neither of whom even reveal their full names (the single-named hero is a bit of a tired gimmick nowadays...Richard Stark's Parker is forgiven because he's been around since the mid-60's).
You don't need to have read other Elvis Cole novels to get into this one; Crais makes it easy to get right into things. For fans of the private-eye novel, you'll find this - like all the other novels by Crais - delightfully entertaining.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Larry Eischen on August 14, 2001
Format: Audio Cassette
Robert Crais breathes new life into the wisecracking PI genre with his Elvis Cole series. What at first looks like a Spenser clone, becomes fresh and satisfying with Crais' guidance. Cole and his partner Joe Pike find themselves as nursemaids to 3 kids whose father has flown from the care of the witness protection program. What looks to be a case of finding a deadbeat drugged out lowlife takes a turn when the father turns out to be a bit different than Cole's image of him. The fight to save the family brings Cole into conflict with Vietmnamese expatriates, the Russian mob, the Witness Protection Program and the US Treasury. It leads to an exciting chase at Disneyland which guarantees that this book will never be made into a Disney film and a stunning conclusion which puts the family in extreme jeopardy. Write on, Mr Crais, write on.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By tiger@execpc.com on August 9, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Indigo Slam is another great Elvis Cole mystery. From the witness protection program, to the Russian mob, to countefeiting, to child neglect. Robert Crais throws all this into his newest Cole novel and more. I thought it was the best of the series so far. With a great plot and characters that are so lifelike, you will have trouble putting this one down. With plenty of action, the author never loses track of where he is going or how he gets there. In these times when most people think a good mystery involes yet another boring serial killer, Robert Crais and Elvis Cole, shows us what a true crime novel is all about. I highly recomend this book to all of you. GOOD READING
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on June 21, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Does anyone not love Elvis Cole? This is one detective that comes across as a human being -- nicely drawn touches in the narrative that result in both interesting stories and a protogonist that you really care about.

In this entry in the continuing adventures of Mr. Cole, we find three children hiring him to find their missing dad. Turns out the missing dad is also being hunted by thugs he previously worked for. Meanwhile, the hero's girl friend is effectively fighting a mean ex-spouse. All of this adds up to a very nice afternoon's read. I recommend this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jason Birkby on June 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I have purchased many Robert Crais novels and finally got a chance to start reading some of them. I could almost kick myself for waiting this long. Crais has a great detective noir style similiar to Spillane and Hammett. However in this story the client is not a woman looking for her husband, but a group of young children looking for their lost father.
Crais' main character P.I. Elvis Cole takes on the case to find the missing father. He figures it will be a quick easy job not knowing what is in store for him. The kids claim that the father is gone looking for a new printing job. However Cole finds out that the father is not what the kids claim. The journey takes Cole on a wild trip with encounters with drug dealers, Russian mobsters, Vietanesse rebels, and crooked U.S. Marshals. The story also ends up in Disneyland a great place to end a story with three kids.
Crais is a pure joy in this novel. His characters of Cole and partner Pike are closely related to Robert Pearker's Spencer and Hawk. The kids are very well written, and all three are different instead of cardboard cutouts, which is how most kids get portrayed in this genre. I highly recommend this one and look forward to much more.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By N. Sausser on June 1, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
It starts out simple enough. A 15-year-old girl and her two younger siblings hire Elvis Cole to find their father who has been missing for eleven days. The situation becomes extremely complicated from there. If you were to plot this story on a graph, it might end up looking like a spider's web. But Crais makes it work. This book was originally published in 1997 and reissued in 2003. It's a fast and entertaining read.
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