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Individualism of Gil Evans Import


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Audio CD, Import, July 3, 1989
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Frequently Bought Together

Individualism of Gil Evans + Out of the Cool + The Complete Pacific Jazz Sessions
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 3, 1989)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Universal I.S.
  • ASIN: B00000476F
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,140 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Time Of The Barracudas
2. The Barbara Song
3. Las Vegas Tango
4. Flute Song/Hotel Me
5. El Toreador
6. Proclamation
7. Nothing Like You
8. Concorde
9. Spoonful

Editorial Reviews

Out of print in the U.S.! CD pressing of this 1964 album from Gil Evans including four bonus tracks. The album features musical assistance from Johnny Coles, Thad Jones, Jimmy Cleveland, Eric Dolphy, Wayne Shorter, Steve Lacy, Kenny Burrell, Barry Galbraith, Ron Carter, Paul Chambers, Gary Peacock, Richard Davis, Elvin Jones and many others. Often referred to as one of the greatest Jazz albums of the '60s, The Individualism Of Gil Evans showcases some of Jazz's finest recorded performances including Wayne Shorter's stunning solo on Kurt Weill's Barbara Song. The album was recorded at A&R Studios, New York in September, 1963; at Webster Hall, New York on April 6 and May 25, 1964; and at Van Gelder's Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on July 9 and October 29, 1964. Nine tracks. Universal.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Paul of London on March 21, 2003
Format: Audio CD
If you like Gil Evans' work with Miles Davis, you'll like this. Some startling compositions -- 'Hotel Me' with its romping rhythm, the stunning 'Las Vegas Tango' -- and some splendid covers, Willie Dixon's 'Spoonful' (with the LP's edit cuts reinstated) and a beautifully funereal go at Kurt Weil's 'Barbara Song'. Listen especially to Elvin Jones' excellent drumming. A classic.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 25, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album represents Gil Evans at the height of his creative expression. Gil Evans is an uncategorizable artist, perhaps because his style is neither exactly bop or cool jazz, but uniquely his own. This album while not a starter (that would be Out of the Cool)is still a serious contender. Lush and expressionistic, it has extra tracks culled from out of print albums or unreleased matter. From the collaborator of Sketches of Spain, this is as the title says, very uniquely one of his solo masterpieces.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Burford on January 5, 2007
Format: Audio CD
O.K. folks here we go, from an ex- Santa Barbara disc jockey to you. The best song on this excellent CD is Las Vegas Tango. What should blow your mind about this song is the multirhythmic backing of Elvin Jones on drum. The band itself is tight and strong. The song is kinda haunting. I've hummed it to myself for the past forty years, and after losing the album a while back, I bought a new CD of it through Amazon.com from England, and I am very happy I own it. I think everyone should own at least one of this, one for themselves and one to give to a friend. This album, and particularly Las Vegas Tango, is one of the best outputs of any band during the 20th century. Buy it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bill Your 'Free Form FM Print DJ on March 30, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you listen to blues blasters like Count Basie or experimenters like Don Ellis, the big band arrangements of Gil Evans will take a lot of getting used to. Evans, more than any of his contemporaries,rejected flash and musical acrobatics in favor of deep, subtle arrangements

The title of this album, "The Individualism Of Gil Evans" is no 1960's marketing device or generic label to sell jazz to the hip. To appreciate Evans, you really have to have high volume to meditate on this quiet music. Listening to him is closer to hearing Mozart than most big band jazz.

Evans on this album starts at a low simmer and scarcely gets to a flame. He uses soft volume, and works subtle but complex arrangements that rest within these dynamics and that you have to listen intently to hear. Check out the soft woodwinds on the title track, or the way the flutes flutter like butterflies on "Flute Song." Listen to the fuglehorn and piano on "Los Vegas Tango."

The amazement with Evans comes long after the first listen, when you have over time absorbed the intricacies he threads into the musical weave. Evans may not be the best first listen, because the depth of the music is so deep in the music.

But patience will always reveal rewards, and for an example, I would point to this album, which shows the mastery of The Individualism Of Gil Evans.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Sensitive Guy on June 5, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Well, sometimes, the old ways are best. Some times, picking what fits on an LP forces choices that really prove to be wise. The extra, "lost" songs that were rescued from the tape vaults or from other oddball LPs don't, in my opinion, add much to a pure, utter classic LP, per its initial incarnation. I would love a disc with the original cuts in the correct order, because such a disk (like "Out of the cool") is an integrated whole -- more than the sum of its astonishing parts. I do like hearing the previously lost bits, but instead of forcing this overstuffed, clunky playlist on us, how about a two-disk set, with the original LP playlist on one, and the lost stuff on the second.

But I complain too long. The original "Individualism" is a colossal phenomenon. Gil Evans IS individual, and what a loss that he's gone.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Walter J. Jamieson Jr. on October 2, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Reading the other reviews of this recording, which I've owned since it was new on Lp and since it came out on CD, has caused me to review my own long-standing opinions. Apart from their apparent unfamiarity with "New Bottle Old Wine" and "Great Jazz Standards", masterpeices both, the other reviewers all made good points and missed a few boats along the way. Elvin Jones' drumming throughout deserves ***** alone, unsurpassed anywhere on record. Despite Elvin's best efforts, however, 'Time of the Barracudas', 'Hotel Me' and 'El Toreador' are hopelessly static. Shorter just noodles and practices scales through most of the former -- a solo that should have been much shorter. Previous reviewers were right on the money about 'Las Vagas Tango', however, one of Evans' best pieces. (Gary Burton has done a good cover of it, by the way.) BUT there are other highlights besides 'Las Vegas Tango', and it's worth buying "Individualism" for them: 'Nothing Like You' has brilliant swinging ensembles and a good, shorter Shorter solo. 'Concorde' is Evans' complex, fascinating take on John Lewis' fugue. I've heard the other version of this, with 4 basses, but so long ago that I can't remember how it compares with this one, but this one is a pleasure. And finally Willie Dixon's 'Spoonful', wonderful from beginning to end, every soloist outstanding: Woods, Thad Jones, Lookofsky, Burrell. And Elvin Jones is simply amazing. Evans had a great way with older Jazz pieces, as "New Bottle" and "Great Jazz Standards" proved. 'Ella Speed', from "Gil Evans & Ten", another must-to-own, and 'Spoonful' from this one proved that he is equally brilliant when mining a slightly different vein of gold.
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