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Infernal Affairs I

Chiu Wai Tony Leung , Tak Wah Andy Lau , Andrew Lau  |  R |  DVD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Chiu Wai Tony Leung, Tak Wah Andy Lau, Chau Sang Anthony Wong, Eric Tsang, Sau Man Sammi Cheng
  • Directors: Andrew Lau
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: Cantonese (Dolby Digital 5.1), Chinese (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: Chinese, English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • DVD Release Date: July 19, 2005
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002JC5GG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #402,911 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Disk No : One

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
64 of 69 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tension Rises Very High: Magnificinet Hong Kong Noir February 7, 2005
Format:DVD
'Infernal Affairs' is the biggest box-office hit in Hong Kong in 2002, and if you see it, you won't be surprised with that fact. The film's premises are very simple; it's about a cop who is actually a gangster, and a gangster who is really a cop. With this clever version of 'undercover' theme (that was previously seen in the films like 'Donnie Brasco'), 'Infernal Affairs' presents as much tension and humanity as was seen in that Johnny Depp/Al Pacino film.

Ming (Andy Lau, 'House of Flying Daggers') is a young mole in the Honk Kong police, whose real boss is Sam, head of the Triads. He has been in police force for nearly ten years, and starts to doubt his life while faithfully swears his loyality to Sam.

At the same time, Yan (Tony Leung, 'In the Mood for Love') is an undercover cop, who has been in Sam's Triad for ten years. His superior officer Wong (Anthony Wong) is the only one who knows his real identity in the police, and Yan is also getting fed up with the life based on lies.

As the poilce force confronts the Triads, both Ming and Yan attempt to help their side anticipate the moves of the other. Finally, both sides realize that there are moles among them, and investigations and revenges make these characters lives more complex and unbearable.

DO NOT EXPECT the martial arts or so-called actions. This is a noir, and that means that it is the characters that matter, or their lives. I know, though the story is simple, it needs leap of faith. But the portraits of the people, and the pains of keeping on pretending what they are not, are vividly presented that the audiences will be sucked into the turmoil of their emotions. And the results are often nerve-shattering.

ANd the acting is all top-notch.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Infernal Affairs and The Departed: Compare and Contrast December 7, 2006
Format:DVD
There are some very good reviews already posted about "Infernal Affairs", although they got some minor facts wrong (such as which actor played which role). This review will look at differences between this film and "The Departed"--for Scorsese fans who enjoyed his version and now wonder if they should see the original.

Yes, they should see the original.

Scorsese did a remake which followed the original storyline closely. Scorsese's style, as always, is marvelous. His work is more controlled than usual--no digressions into extended violent scenes (as in Casino, although "The Departed" film is much more violent than "Infernal Affairs"), no plot diversions into draft riots during the Civil War...etc.

However, the Scorsese film--which I enjoyed and was his best film in years--left me unsatisfied, while "Infernal Affairs" was extremely satisfying. Both films are tragedies, but the drama is far more deeply felt (for me) in "Infernal Affairs" than in "The Departed".

Why?

The answer lies in the difference in approach between the film making cultures of Hong Kong and Hollywood. Between what each culture feels the audience wants. Between the pressures of a higher budget and bigger stars. Scorsese, whether the actors asked for it or not, clearly felt a need to give the principal actors meatier roles. The film brothers who made the Hong Kong original only wanted to get the job done--a crisp story that did what it needed to, and then got out.

The Hollywood version takes a lot of time to provide additional detail to the story to flesh out the characters and give them showy scenes. "The Departed" runs about forty minutes longer than "Infernal Affairs". It adds a love interest (which really goes nowhere) and a lot of character details.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing! End of story. May 12, 2006
By Shaun
Format:DVD
Infernal Affairs begins as young police cadet named Chan Wing Yan (Tony Leung) is being groomed by the highest ranks of the Academy to eventually become an inside man for the police. His keen eye and steady dimeaner makes him the perfect candidate to infiltrate the Triads, who have taken control of Hong Kong's streets and are peddling massive amounts of drugs to it's citizens. At the same time, a different road is laid out for fellow Academy officer Lau Kin Ming (Andy Lau). Although we aren't witness to the actual path he takes, Ming becomes Yan's counterpart in the film, as he uses his position within the higher ranks of the police department to keep Triad Boss Sam a step ahead of any police actions. Sam is deftly played by Eric Tsang, who gives a highly effective, authentic performance here. What follows is one of the best table-turning, catch-me-if-you-can cop stories ever put to film.

Often compared with another great epic, Heat, Infernal Affairs is quicker, brighter and goes down in 40 minute less time. It's apparent why this film became a smashing success in Asia and in turn, exploded onto the world scene. Spawning a sequel (which is actually a prequel) and then a third installment.

Returning to the story; Yan, after leaving the Academy and subsequently earning his chops

on the street as a Triad footman for 10 years, becomes a member deep in Sam's inner circle. Yan continues to work directly and exclusively with Superintendent Wong (played by Anthony Wong) feeding him information that Wong puts to good use. He brings that information to his most elite police team led by Officer Ming, who unbeknownst to Wong, relays it back to the Triads.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Iconic gangster film out of Hong Kong that was later ...
Iconic gangster film out of Hong Kong that was later re-made (but not equaled) by Scorcese and Di Caprio in "The Departed." If you watch only 1 gangster film, this is IT.
Published 4 days ago by MV
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good!
If you've ever seen the Departed and did not know...this is the movie Martin Scorsese borrowed the story line from. I Recommend this movie.
Published 23 days ago by lemarq
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent film. Excellent blu-ray transfer.
Film is identical to the Hong Kong release, in cut and quality of transfer, but with "improved" subtitles. Read more
Published 1 month ago by JNagarya
5.0 out of 5 stars This brainy, ballsy Hong Kong thriller rewrote the book on action!
A Hong Kong home run: brilliant suspense, black humor, and characters you care about in a game of cat-and-mouse that shows you everything but still surprises with a killer ending. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Catherine
2.0 out of 5 stars Poorly executed and directed
I had high hopes but alas just watch the remake. There are many Chinese films done much better than this.
Published 5 months ago by David'sTechReviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Great
I watched this because of the reference to The Departed. It was good but you have to be ok with subtitles.
Published 6 months ago by phyllis
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a terrible film
One of the rare occasions when the remake is better than the predecessor, The Departed is far superior. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Martin89
5.0 out of 5 stars The Departed ripped off this excellent crime thriller
Andy Lau and Tony Leung are in top form as the protagonists in this gritty thriller . The twists and turns will keep you glued to your seat until the very end. Read more
Published 10 months ago by magic toast
4.0 out of 5 stars "The Departed" In a Far East Setting
Good performances by interesting actors performing somewhat intriguing roles. An engrossing police story line that includes some topical, fairly current policing technology and... Read more
Published 11 months ago by James E Adams
5.0 out of 5 stars A story with lots of action that is layered and timed perfectly!
'Can totally see why Scorsese 'borrowed' the story from Andrew Lau, it's fantastic, psychological, romantic - You should see this one before seeing The Departed.
Published 13 months ago by Geoffrey Lee
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