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Infernal Angels (Amos Walker Mysteries) Paperback – July 2, 2013


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Product Details

  • Series: Amos Walker Mysteries (Book 21)
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Forge Books; Reprint edition (July 2, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765319586
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765319586
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.7 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,890,091 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Left-Handed Dollar, the latest Amos Walker novel newly released in 2010:

Estleman proves conclusively that there's plenty of life left in the contemporary hard-boiled subgenre.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The latest Walker novel features all the selling points that have made the series a touchstone for fans of hard-boiled crime fiction: irrepressible tough-guy dialogue, great plotting, vibrant Detroit milieu, and a hero who has whiskey on his breath and nicotine stains on his fingers.” —Booklist

“Estleman's latest intricate and wholly enjoyable yarn is peppered with mob lore, Detroit history, and the ever-present one-liners. It is sure to please fans of urban mysteries as well as classic detective genre devotees. Strongly recommended.” —Library Journal

Estleman, one of America's best crime novelists, has produced a well-plotted, hard-boiled tale that's rife with mayhem and murder.”—Lansing State Journal

Praise for American Detective, one of Publishers Weekly’s 100 best books of 2007 and the nineteenth Amos Walker mystery:

“Estleman delivers some outstanding stuff on the hazards of the profession, including a bone-chilling stakeout on a lonely lake in the dead of night, that could come only from an old pro.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Estleman turns Amos Walker loose in a plot and it’s pure private eye all the way. In a great tradition, the gumshoe with an attitude. No one does it better.” —Elmore Leonard, bestselling author of Get Shorty

“Loren D. Estleman is one of a handful of candidates for the title of true heir to Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald. He is a great ‘American Detective’ writer.” Max Allan Collins, bestselling author of Road to Perdition

“Estleman's prose is as gritty and compelling as ever as he lets fly razor-sharp dialogue, brings the Motor City to life and combines a whodunit plot with traditional noir action.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Normally I’m a voracious plot reader, burning through the pages for the action, but here, though the plot is nicely twisty, I’m more than happy to slow down enough to take in the scenery, colored by Amos’ snappy comebacks and observations based on the bigger half of a life lived in other people’s problems. Highly recommended.” —GumshoeReview.com

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

LOREN D. ESTLEMAN is the author of more than seventy novels. He has won four Shamus Awards, five Spur Awards, three Western Heritage Awards, and the Owen Wister Life Achievement Award, among others. He lives with his wife, author Deborah Morgan, in central Michigan.


More About the Author

Loren D. Estleman graduated from Eastern Michigan University in 1974 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature and Journalism. In 2002, his alma mater presented him with an honorary doctorate in letters. He left the job market in 1980 to write full time, after a few years spent "pounding out beat-the-train journalism" during his day job as a reporter before going home and writing fiction at night.

His first novel was published in 1976, and has been followed by more than 70 books and hundreds of short stories and articles. His series include novels about Detroit detective Amos Walker, professional killer Peter Macklin, L.A. film detective and amateur sleuth Valentino, and the Detroit crime series. On the western side is the U.S. Deputy Marshal Page Murdock series. Additionally, he's written dozens of stand-alone novels.

His books have been translated into 27 languages and have won multiple Shamus, Spur, Western Heritage, and Stirrup awards. He has been nominated for the National Book Award and the Edgar Allan Poe Award. In 2012, the Western Writers of America honored him with the Lifetime Achievement Award.

He lives in Michigan and is married to writer Deborah Morgan. Find out more about Estleman and his books on his website: lorenestleman.com

Customer Reviews

His descriptions of several characters are exquisite portraits.
Gloria Feit
Loren D. Estelman has another Amos Walker book out, and it's almost as good as The Left-Handed Dollar.
David Roy
Why is his leg hurting, when it wasn't in the Left-Handed Dollar.
Eppy Seppanen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David Roy on October 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Loren D. Estelman has another Amos Walker book out, and it's almost as good as The Left-Handed Dollar. This novel, Infernal Angels, has that same hard-boiled Detroit atmosphere that litters all of Estelman's books, making for a quick but satisfying read.

It all starts with a late-night quest for coffee. Walker's out of it and goes to the local Walgreens for some more. A cop friend who's staking out the store gives him a tip on some stolen cable converter boxes, which seems like a quick and easy way for Walker to bring in some money. Little does he know that said boxes will soon involve him with the seedier side of Detroit as well as become a national security issue. It also brings in some old friends. The next time Walker runs out of coffee, he may just go back to bed.

Infernal Angels finds Walker torn in three different directions by representatives of law enforcement, and it's fun watching him interact with all of them, occasionally playing them off of one another. Jurisdiction battles are quite common in police novels, but it's interesting to see one from an outsider's point of view.

As usual, Estelman's dialogue is top-notch. Walker quips his way through danger when the going gets too rough. The interplay between the cops, the Feds, and Walker is also excellent. The best example, though, is the conversations between Walker and the various fences where he begins the investigation of the converter boxes.

The characters in Infernal Angels are just as interesting and quirky as ever too. There's Eugenia Pappas, wife of a now-dead criminal, who appears to be trying to take his business legitimate, though she isn't keeping an eye on the people around her. She thinks she can buy her way into Heaven in other ways than just living a virtuous life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gloria Feit VINE VOICE on November 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In the twenty-first novel in the wonderful Amos Walker series, Loren Estleman once again captures the spirit of Detroit, as much a character in the novel as it is the mise en scene. As the author describes it, it is a city which "continued its slug's crawl toward bleak oblivion." Although the tale begins innocuously enough, when Walker is hired to recover 25 stolen cable-TV converter boxes, it is soon apparent that there is more going on than meets the eye, when two people with whom Walker has spoken turn up dead, within hours of those meetings.

Walker is undaunted, and pursues the case with even greater zeal. He is no longer invincible, he admits: "In the pursuit of my profession I'd been shot, beaten, coldcocked, drugged, and threatened with death . . . It would be a good joke on a lot of bad people if it was a heart episode that took me." The title derives from the line, soon after the second body is discovered, that of a man Walker had known for years: "Once you'd made the decision to live on the dark side of the moon, all your friends were infernal angels at best."

His descriptions of several characters are exquisite portraits. Of a detective: "He'd lost flesh from age and the weight of the world, pasting skin to bone like shrink-wrap. His boys were grown and married, one of them was still speaking to him, and his wife, who earned more money than he did working shorter hours, was often away on business. Home for him was just a place to change horses between shifts;" of a colleague: "His face was the same vintage as mine, but he ironed his more often and packed it in ice overnight;" a building caretaker "an ambulatory dandelion gone to seed." The prose is equal parts elegance and street.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carolyn J. Rose on December 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Like some of the other reviewers, I had trouble suspending disbelief for the foot chase given that Amos has a bad leg and can't quit smoking. But the descriptions, as always, are incredible, and the similes make the characters come alive.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tech Teacher on September 14, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm such a fan of Walker novels I overlooked the criticisms that the other reviewers made when reading it.

I still enjoyed it, but it's not a very strong entry.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eppy Seppanen on July 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Infernal Angels is not Estleman's best work. It seems a little out of date. Converter boxes were so two years ago. The dialogue between Walker, Thayer, Hornet is dull and doesn't move the plot along. How long ago did cops quit using polaroids? Why is his leg hurting, when it wasn't in the Left-Handed Dollar. A foot chase--Walker smokes too much to have wheels like that---get real.
I love Estleman's writing and his Amos Walker character, but this book wasn't up to his usual high standards. I'm looking forward to his next Walker novel-just take more care and have someone edit it more carefully.
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Format: Hardcover
Detroit P.I. Amos Walker appears for the twenty-first time in Infernal Angels. As always, the case seems innocuous enough at the beginning: a resale dealer has been burglarized and twenty-five HDTV converters have been stolen.

Amos is a detective of the old school who still drives a souped-up Oldsmobile Cutlass and who only recently--and begrudgingly--got a cell phone. He wouldn't know an HDTV converter from an Xbox 360. The dealer patiently shows him the sample he was sent ahead of the shipment that was stolen and explains what it does. That night, the resale man appears on television, showing the sample converter to a reporter who has tumbled to the story.

Bad move.

The burglar, or burglars, now realizing that they apparently missed one of the converters, return to the scene and steal it, this time killing the resale dealer in the process. One might wonder why in the hell an HDTV converter, or even twenty-six of them, would be worth all this trouble, but as Walker belatedly discovers, the twenty-five that were originally stolen were packed with super high-grade heroin and were shipped to the resale dealer by accident.

Now a fortune in primo heroin is missing and drug addicts are dropping like flies on the streets of Detroit. The dealer had hired Walker for three days, and Amos feels honor-bound to give the man his due, even though the client has now expired. This will involve him with a lot of rough characters and, to make matters worse, the local cops and the Feds will soon be all over his case.

Amos Walker is his own man, and he doesn't take a lot of crap from people, irrespective of their rank. As is usually the case in these books, his determination and his insubordination will get him into a lot of trouble.
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