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Inferno: New Tales of Terror and the Supernatural Hardcover – December 10, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (December 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765315580
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765315588
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,259,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Datlow (The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror) makes a solid claim to being the premiere horror editor of her generation with this state-of-the-art anthology of 20 new stories by some of horror fiction's best and brightest. Several outstanding selections feature imperiled children and explore the horrific potential of childhood fears, among them Glen Hirshberg's The Janus Tree, which gives a creepy supernatural spin to a poignant memoir of adolescent angst and alienation, and Stephen Gallagher's Misadventure, in which a young man's near-death experience as a child endows him as an adult with consoling insight into the afterlife. The compilation's variety of approaches and moods is exemplary, ranging from the natural supernaturalism of Laird Barron's cosmic horror tale The Forest, to the unsettling psychological horror of Lucius Shepard's The Ease with Which We Freed the Beast; the metaphysical terrors of Conrad Williams's Perhaps the Last; and the slapstick grotesquerie of K.W. Jeter's black comedy Riding Bitch. If this book can be taken as a gauge of the vitality of imagination in contemporary horror fiction, then the genre is very healthy indeed. (Dec.)
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Review

"Datlow makes a solid claim to being the premiere horror editor of her generation." --Publishers Weekly (starred review) on Inferno
 

“One good ghost story, one truly effective tale, is usually sufficient to scare the bejesus out of a person. The Dark contains sixteen tales, enough to keep fans tossing and turning and peeking under the bed for a fortnight and then some. Watch your hackles when you read this book; Ms. Datlow and her horrormongers are out to raise them.” --Dallas Morning News

 

“Sure to provide a yardstick by which future ghost fiction will be measured.” --Publishers Weekly (starred review) on The Dark


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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Walls on February 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
Anthologies like this are about the only place to find horror short stories these days, which is unfortunate because I think scary short stories are pretty awesome. The perfect length to read before turning off the light at night. And reading one right before bed is like dropping a little bit of mental lsd into your dreams.

Ellen Datlow has been doing the horror thing for a couple of decades now. She's edited over 50 anthologies and won a ton of awards for doing so. The point is, if you are gonna pick somebody to take you by the hand and show you what's good in horror short fiction these days, she's the one you wanna pick.

This anthology doesn't have a theme. It's 20 stories that Datlow chose "to showcase the range of subjects imagined by a number of my favorite writers inside and outside the horror field". When I looked through the contents I saw only half a dozen or so authors whose names were familiar to me.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tubereuse on July 16, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I particularly like "Bethany's Wood" by Paul Finch, "Stilled Life" by Pat Cadigan, and "An Apiary of White Bees" by Lee Thomas. Oh, that stories like these have made it into YBFH 2008. I read the Datlow-chosen stories in YBFH 2007 right after reading Inferno and was disappointed; the story by Oates, in particular, seemed misplaced: I'm a fan of the bizarre, and this one seemed pointlessly grotesque instead. But Inferno is everything I look for in modern horror! I think it's Ellen's best book so far.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By L. B. Guernsey on January 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
I've read all 3 of Datlow's Best Horror anthologies, and many of the earlier Year's Best Horror and Fantasy. Each of these was better than this. None of these stories was more than mildly interesting, certain none made me "leave the light on after dark" or "check under the bed" for creepers. If you want subtle, literate slow-moving stories, these may be for you, but nothing here was really intense, exciting or unusual.
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Format: Kindle Edition
An excellent collection of strange haunting stories w some of the best literary writing ive yet seen. Highly recmcommended antho
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had been an admirer of ghost stories and the "quiet horror" (although I never used to know it under that name) ever since I started reading fiction. Violence, especially if that is described to be taking place in the commonest possible circumstances (e.g. within the four walls of a drab room occupied by a family not that different from mine), or which involves loss & pain to people who can be actually felt for in everyday life (e.g. someone's children or wife getting lost or murdered or tortured) is not preferred by me while trying to acquire that pleasing chill by going through printed words. Perhaps that is not a very literate thing to do, esp. since I have been reading horror for many-many years now. But this collection, often dealing with exactly those issues which I detest, succeeded in moving me and compelling me to read every one of them, often against my own wishes. After reading these stories, I was forced to conclude that the editor has been supremely successful in her objective: giving the readers an idea about how it really might feel while burning in the fires of own hell. I had gone through it during the reading!

The contents are:

1) Riding Bitch by K.W. Jeter
2) Misadventure by Stephen Gallagher
3) The Forest by Laird Barron
4) The Monsters of Heaven by Nathan Ballingrud
5) Inelastic Collisions by Elizabeth Bear
6) The Uninvited by Christopher Fowler
7) 13 o'clock by Mike O'Driscoll
8) Lives by John Grant
9) Ghorla by Mark Samuels
10) Face by Joyce Carol Oates
12) An Apiary of White Bees by Lee Thomas
13) The Keeper by P.D.
Read more ›
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