Infinite Crisis and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $7.15 (40%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Infinite Crisis has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: No sign of writing, notes, or highlights in text. May have little shelf wear on corners
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Infinite Crisis Paperback – January 16, 2008


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.84
$9.20 $5.79
Comic
"Please retry"
$10.84 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Infinite Crisis + Crisis On Infinite Earths + Final Crisis (New Edition)
Price for all three: $40.94

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (January 16, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401210600
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401210601
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 6.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (84 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,832 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up—One of the most talked about series in comics publishing ever, "Infinite Crisis" is now out in a one-volume set of all seven original issues. It's about the alternative dimensions of Earths Prime, One, and Two, and the multiple characters that cross-pollinate these worlds. The three major DC heroes, Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, are trying to work out the causality and relentless spin-offs from the infinite worlds. Panels from older comics are set beside modern renderings, showing the aging DC finally seems to acknowledge. At one point, Batman makes a caustic reference to when Superman died-a major news event from the '90s. In many ways, this title has a sad tone, as one realizes that the publisher is setting aside its legendary triad in favor of the newer, more modern heroes. Although comics frequently use the story line of the "final" appearance, and DC has not used that explicitly here, "Infinite Crisis" does feel like the beginning of the end. There are so many plotlines and moments here that could be mentioned; one that leaps to mind is the intergalactic brotherhood of Green Lanterns, and their final act captured in one mesmerizing panel. Simply put: a must-have for most libraries.—John Leighton, Brooklyn Public Library, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Every so often, the continuity of DC's interlocking comic books gets so convoluted and cluttered that the company clears the boards with an overarching story encompassing all its titles. The seven-issue Infinite Crisis, a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths (1985), is the latest such tale.A parallel-universe version of Superman, who was relegated to limbo at the end of Infinite Earths, escapes and attempts to replace the Earth that faithful readers have been watching for the past two decades with his own. The conflict that follows affects virtually every superhero in the DC universe, killing off extraneous characters and provoking the revamping of others. Infinite Crisis also aims to veer away from the dark, cynical tone that has infected the superhero genre of late. It skirts incomprehensibility, but so does much else in DC's recent output, and that is what Crisis addresses. The artwork, mostly by Phil Jimenez, creditably corrals a huge cast and keeps the myriad story lines going. Casual readers may be baffled, but for hard-core superhero fans, this is essential. Gordon Flagg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Geoff Johns originally hails from Detroit, Michigan. He attended Michigan State University, where he earned a degree in Media Arts and Film. He began his comics career creating and writing Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. for DC Comics.

His first comic assignment led to a critically acclaimed run on the The Flash and JSA for DC Comics. Since then, he has quickly become one of the most popular and imaginative writers in comic books today, working on titles including a highly successful re-imagining of Green Lantern, The Flash: Rebirth, Superman: Secret Origin, Action Comics, Adventure Comics, Teen Titans, Justice Society of America, Infinite Crisis and the experimental breakout hit series 52 for DC with Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka and Mark Waid. Geoff received the Wizard Fan Award for Breakout Talent of 2002 and Writer of the Year for 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 as well as the CBG Writer of the Year 2003 thru 2005 and 2007 and 2008 and CBG Best Comic Book Series for JSA 2001 thru 2005. Geoff penned the acclaimed "Legion" episode of SMALLVILLE. He also served as a writer for the fourth season of ROBOT CHICKEN. Geoff is currently working on film projects with Warner Brothers to be announced soon.

Geoff recently became a New York Times Bestselling author with the graphic novel Superman: Brainiac with art by Gary Frank among many others.

Customer Reviews

There are too many characters and not much of a story to follow.
HeroJunkie
If you like superhero crossovers but think they have a little too much going on, then this is the book for you.
Pablo
If you're a DC fan and had the chance to read Crisis on Infinite Earths and enjoyed it, you can't miss this.
Cristiano Trindade

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 90 people found the following review helpful By Rayhan S on October 20, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I hated the original Crisis on Infinite Earths. It was too long, too convulated, the conversations bordered on cheesiness etc...the only redeeming factor in my opinion was that it cleaned out the multivese and set foundations for a more coherent continuity. Fast forward 20+ years and the Crisis has returned. This book has a lot going for it and has foundations based on many previous events. The plot is not simple but I will try my best to provide a synopsis.

After the original Crisis, the four surviving memebers were Superman and Lois Lane of Earth 2 (from The Golden Age type comics ); Superboy from Earth Prime (the Superboy from the early Superboy stories) and Alexander Luthor of Earth 3 (son of Lex Luthor who is actually a good guy amongst the CSA which has evil versions of the JLA, Owlman, Ultraman, etc). After surviving and playing pivotal roles in the original crisis, these folks have been on a self-imposed exile in "paradise" and have been watching Earth 1 (this is the Earth with our regular characters). But much to their disappointment, despite their sacrifices, the heroes of Earth 1 have lost their ways...i.e. Batman being mindwiped, JLA is disbanded, Superman can't lead, Wonder Woman kills Maxwell Lord, Batman's Brother I satellite turning on the superheros etc.). They decided to break out and return to Earth 1 to teach the Earth 1 heroes what it means to be heroes...at least that's what Earth 2 Superman wants. Superboy Prime simply misses his old world, his parents, his girl and wants to return home. The real culprit here is Alex Luthor who channels these emotions as a fuel to get what he wants....a perfect Earth.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Farouk Samad on February 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Do you have a degree in the DC universe? If not, don't bother with this. I'm a fan of Batman, know a little about Superman, and have read all of Birds of Prey, the latest volume of Teen Titans, and a lot of the JLA from Morrison onwards, and I had a hard time following Crisis. That it's overflowing with minor DC characters who I didn't recognise and references to events that occurred decades ago are only two of the problems. From a storytelling perspective, it's a complete mess. There are so many different threads that not one has any real depth to it and all move slowly. And it's all a bit anti-climatic at the end. This was going to supposedly change the whole face of the DCU, but it hasn't really.

To illustrate how incomprehensible Crisis will be if you're not an avid DCU fan, take a look for those internet sites that trace all the comics that are related to Infinte Crisis. There's a huge number of titles that you need to read just to understand what's happening in the first issue of Infinte Crisis. All in all, not one for the casual fan.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Comics Fan on October 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
Unless you read DC comics religiously, you will not enjoy this book. One of the main complaints I hear from people that try to read these massive DC events is that they are inaccessible to regular people. Nothing in this book will make sense to you unless you know about 30+ years of DC comic history. If you excuse the lazy writing, the art is pretty good. The only other problem is that you won't care about any of the characters in the book because you wont know a thing about them....Except maybe the 3 different versions Superman. You did know there were 3 of them right?
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 12, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I hate cross overs, I really do. For so many years, there have been so many cross overs that promise to change the status quo of the universe they take place in and they hardly ever deliver. They all follow the same formula: a horde of heroes either face off against a horde of villains in a "final" battle, or a horde of heroes unite against a common threat that wants to wipe out said universe. Now, last year's Identity Crisis set the stage for things to come, as Elongated Man's wife Sue was murdered by someone in the JLA circle, and it was revealed that certain JLA members were involved in mind-wiping villains throughout the years, and even some of their own as well. Infinite Crisis picks up after the events of Identity Crisis and a number of lead-in mini-series', and comes on the 20th anniversary of Crisis on Infinite Earths, which was one of the few cross overs that actually delivered on it's promise and changed everything about the DC universe at the time. Fan favorite writer Geoff Johns, best known for his long run on the Flash as well as JSA and Green Lantern, is at the helm here with the great Phil Jimenez (New X-Men) providing the art; as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and the rest of the heroes unite as those thought long gone make a stunning return to make the universe what it once was: no matter the cost. The sacrifice of a hero and the tragic descent into insanity for a golden/silver-age icon are just two of the highlights of this collection. Now as I said before, I hate cross overs. But the way that Johns balances everything going on in this collected edition of the seven issue mini-series is simply amazing. The art by Jimenez isn't half bad either, actually, it's spectacular.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?