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Information Modeling and Relational Databases: From Conceptual Analysis to Logical Design (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems) Paperback – April 16, 2001

12 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The information revolution is in motion, and sound database design will drive the ease of data handling and, in turn, improve the results of business practices. A timely topic, then, is Object-Role Modeling (ORM), a way to design and query databases via an application written in lay terms. Halpin expertly explains ORM as well as other solid database design practices so that even seasoned pros will learn something new. Designers, programmers, systems analysts, and managers will discover everything they need to know about database design. Complete with a companion web site, this is highly recommended for libraries serving techies.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Back Cover


Information Modeling and Relational Databases provides an introduction to ORM (Object Role Modeling)-and much more. In fact, it's the only book to go beyond introductory coverage and provide all of the in-depth instruction you need to transform knowledge from domain experts into a sound database design.


Inside, ORM authority Terry Halpin blends conceptual information with practical instruction that will let you begin using ORM effectively as soon as possible. Supported by examples, exercises, and useful background information, his step-by-step approach teaches you to develop a natural-language-based ORM model and then, where needed, abstract ER and UML models from it. This book will quickly make you proficient in the modeling technique that is proving vital to the development of accurate and efficient databases that best meet real business objectives.


Features

  • The most in-depth coverage of Object Role Modeling available anywhere-written by a pioneer in the development of ORM.
  • Provides additional coverage of Entity Relationship (ER) modeling and the Unified Modeling Language-all from an ORM perspective.
  • Intended for anyone with a stake in the accuracy and efficacy of databases: systems analysts, information modelers, database designers and administrators, instructors, managers, and programmers.
  • Explains and illustrates required concepts from mathematics and set theory.
  • Via a companion Web site, provides answers to exercises, appendices covering the history of computer generations, subtype matrices, and advanced SQL queries, and links to downloadable ORM tools.

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Product Details

  • Series: The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems
  • Paperback: 761 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (April 16, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558606726
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558606722
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.8 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,548,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

139 of 141 people found the following review helpful By Scot Becker on April 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
I used to think that the best book one could read in order to really learn the science and the art of data modeling was Conceptual Schema and Relational Database Design. I used to think that, that is, until I read the Information Modeling and Relational Databases: From Conceptual Analysis to Logical Design.
Originally intended to be the third edition of the "Conceptual Schema" text, this new book offers the same definitive information as its predecessor with a large amount of added information. So much more information, in fact, that the book has grown by roughly 250 pages (and that is not counting the additional appendices available online)!
The text begins with a warning. Halpin refers to the 1999 Mars Climate Orbiter accident in which a simple conversion from imperial to metric units caused the $125 million dollar craft to be destroyed. "Data itself is not enough," Halpin cautions, "what we really need is information."
And so begins the introduction of the most accurate way to model data: Object-Role Modeling (ORM). For those of you not familiar with the technique, ORM is a fact-based approach to modeling that not only captures the semantics of data - in the native language of the subject matter expert - but it also captures many rules, offers an embedded process to ensure the model is correct, and completely maps to any fully normalized logical notation (e.g. ER, UML).
Let me re-phrase the above, because it is extremely important.
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94 of 96 people found the following review helpful By Bill MacLean on April 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
Summary: Dr. Terry Halpin makes a compelling case for designing databases using a method called Object Role Modeling (ORM), and teaches the reader how to use the method.
Review: A properly designed database is critical to the success of business applications. Developers love good database designs because they are much easier to code against, and they make it much easier to accommodate the business requirements of the user, which is after all the purpose of the application. Everyone recognizes the need for good data design, but few people know how fill that need. A good database design requires a good data model, where does one learn how to create a good data model? If you are looking for one book that will really make a difference the next time you design a database, look no further than Information Modeling and Relational Databases by Dr. Terry Halpin.
Halpin's writing style is clear and interesting, and the numerous examples he uses make the concepts easier to digest. Besides examples within the text, each subsection of the book has a complete set of exercises. Comparing your answers with the supplied answers is a great way to make sure you've absorbed the material. This book is very comprehensive; it starts with simple concepts, and ends with discussions of relational algebra, UML and ER modeling, in addition to Halpin's preferred method, Object Role Modeling (ORM).
Halpin's presentation and explanation of ORM sets this book apart from other data modeling books. As Halpin explains it, the focus in ORM is on business facts, not abstract data structures. As a professional database designer, one of the most common (and often valid) criticisms I encounter is that data modelers often seem too far removed from the business or too "theoretical".
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "davidmarlin" on February 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
After having used ER modeling with extreme frustration, I finally decided to investigate something new. This is the bible for ORM, and ORM is just so far superior to ER for conceptual modeling, which I now realize is critical.
Conceptual modeling means modeling your data in a way that makes sense to everyone, from the business experts (who know nothing about databases) to the coders and DBA's. And ORM provides a logical, intuitive way to do this.
Once you've got a conceptual model, it's pretty straightforward to get an ER model, from which you can develop the logical databased design. In fact, MS Visio (forget which version) does this for you.
The reason ER fails is that it cannot model data in a stable way. It still has a place, but ORM is so much more powerful, scalable, and stable.
And not only will you learn about ORM (he has great exercises to help practice), but you will learn a lot about data in general.
This is the best technical/developer/software engineering book I have ever read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By An avid reader on November 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is a masterpiece. ORM as a concept is so powerful. I have been doing Software Design for about 6 years now, and I always felt that there was a conceptual gap between writing use cases and doing software analysis and design from them. It needed an experienced designer in order to make a jump from use cases to analysis & design. (Even then the business facts would be missed out or simply be wrong, that would show up as bugs later on). I was on the lookout for "something" that helps me in real "industrial strength" software. ORM's fact oriention is a real supplement (and enhancement) to object orientation.
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