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126 of 154 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray quality nice, but "Special Edition" not so special...
This is just a review of the Blu-Ray "2 Disc Special Edition" since there are plenty of reviews of the movie itself by reviewers far more qualified than I.

The video and sound quality is excellent and I have no complaints about that. But I have to give this 4 stars instead of 5, because, I just don't get some of the "marketing lingo" on this package:...
Published on January 21, 2010 by P. M. Bego

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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A dizzying film loses its focus . . . what about the Basterds?
The legend of "Inglorious Basterds," QT's long-germinating WWII epic, is as entertaining as the movie itself. That's not a criticism. Newspaper and Internet stories have dangled tantalizing tales of Tarantino nurturing this script along - it will be a four-hour epic, it will be a miniseries a la "Band of Brothers," it will be a tribute to "The Dirty Dozen," it will be...
Published on February 22, 2010 by Scott Schiefelbein


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126 of 154 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blu-ray quality nice, but "Special Edition" not so special..., January 21, 2010
By 
P. M. Bego (Northwest USA) - See all my reviews
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This is just a review of the Blu-Ray "2 Disc Special Edition" since there are plenty of reviews of the movie itself by reviewers far more qualified than I.

The video and sound quality is excellent and I have no complaints about that. But I have to give this 4 stars instead of 5, because, I just don't get some of the "marketing lingo" on this package:

* This version does NOT include a running commentary. None at all (not director, not actors, not cinematographer, nothing). To me this is really odd -- it seems that almost all DVDs released in the last 10 years have had some sort of commentary track. Especially with a Tarantino movie, this seems like something you really WANT to have.
* I think this is the only Blu-ray version available right now. It includes the "digital copy" but that is just a lower-res copy of a movie with DRM, nothing wrong with getting that with it, but that is one of the TWO discs in the "Special Edition"
* If this is the only one available, and it doesn't include stuff like a commentary, what makes the Marketing people put the "Special Edition" tag on it? I guess because it comes with the low-res copy, see previous item...
* Other info on the package is misleading too. It says under "Additional Features:" "The original Inglorious Bastards." This might lead one to conclude that it includes the original movie (and there would be plenty of room for an SD copy of a movie on a Blu-ray disk. This feature is just a 10-minute summary of the movie and discusses it's relation to the new movie. A nice feature worth watching, but I think the way it is named as a feature is misleading.
* Minor thing: They put a sticker about "Includes Digital Copy" on the metallic-printed cardboard sleeve. When you take off the sticker, it removes part of the metallic printing. I know these sleeves are only meant to make the product look nice and flashy and get your attention when it's on a store shelf. But for those of us that like to keep these, it was annoying the way it was stickered. If they put the sticker on the outer plastic shrink-wrap this wouldn't be a problem.

Still a great movie and I'm glad I got the disc. Giving it 4 of 5 because of the questionable "Special-ness" of the Edition.
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332 of 414 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very, VERY entertaining but could have been a classic., August 24, 2009
By 
RMurray847 (Albuquerque, NM United States) - See all my reviews
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One of the great pleasures of Quentin Tarantino movies is the wonderfully inventive casting that he employs. In PULP FICTION, he revived the career of John Travolta, made Samuel Jackson a star, pushed Bruce Willis into another echelon and even helped get Ving Rhames off to a good start. In JACKIE BROWN, he burnished Pam Grier & Robert Forster's careers. In KILL BILL, he reinvented Uma Thurman and reinvigorated David Carradine. Even in DEATH PROOF, he introduced the world to the amazing stuntwoman Zoe Bell and gave Kurt Russell the kind of part he's missed out on for too long.

And now, wonderfully, in INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS, he's introduced the American viewer to some stellar European actors, namely Melanie Laurent and particularly Christoph Waltz, now an easy favorite for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

Tarantino also frequently tries the patience of his viewers with his rococo dialogue and insistence on constantly reminding us that we're watching a movie. In PULP FICTION, all his "habits" were fresh and new to most viewers (because, really, how many of us had seen RESERVOIR DOGS before we saw FICTION?), but over time, we learned that Tarantino was often just a little too pleased with his own screenwriting and often too pleased with his own directing. In a completely off-the-wall piece like the priceless KILL BILL films, everything worked to form a crazy-quilt whole. In INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS, he's too clever for his own good at times.

BASTERDS tells the completely untrue story of how World War II might have ended had a group of bloodthirsty, highly trained American Jews been allowed to infiltrate Nazi occupied France with no mission other than to take Nazi scalps. Oh, and how that mission needed to collide with one fateful night when all the top leadership of Germany attended the gala opening of a new propaganda film held at a movie theatre owned by a beautiful French girl who was actually a Jew who had escaped a massacre that had taken her entire family and now she's bent on revenge at any cost. And of how her goal coincides with that of an undercover British agent who just happens to be a German film scholar and a German double agent who happens to be a movie star.

I know that sounds a little confusing. To Tarantino's credit, the plot as laid out in this 150 minute film is actually easy to follow. In fact, he's put everything into easy-to-digest chapters. It does ask us to believe that every important member of the German government & military would all assemble in a fairly public place at one time...but if you can get past that hurdle, there is much vicarious pleasure to be had in watching WWII reinvented by Tarantino.

By far, the best part of the film is Chapter 1. It features Waltz as SS officer Col. Hans Landa in what is easily the most chilling portrayal of a Nazi since Ralph Fiennes donned the uniform in SCHINDLER'S LIST. Fiennes role (and that entire brilliant movie) were for altogether different purposes. Landa comes off more like a Nazi Hannibal Lecter (without the strange dining preferences)...he's a bit of a lone wolf in his own party. He's feared by all, because he has a wonderful BS detector that helps him root out deception at every turn. In the opening scene, which plays out like a delicate one-act play, Landa comes to a humble French farmhouse and speaks with the owner. We know the owner is hiding Jews beneath his floorboard, and we're pretty sure Landa knows it too. Just how he gets that information, through one of the most tense interrogation scenes you'll ever see, is a joy to behold. You literally find yourself not breathing. I leaned forward in my seat. And yet there is never a raised voice, nor a threatening gesture. The screws are applied through intensity of manner. Waltz instantly makes his character a classic. Tarantino the writer has crafted brilliant dialogue, and Tarantino the director films it all with rare taste and simplicity, and Waltz knocks it out of the park.

The rest of the film is more uneven. While Brad Pitt is a goofy delight as Aldo Raine, leader of the Basterds...it's a performance that is more campy than believable. His Basterds, including folks like director Eli Roth and B.J. Novak from TV's "The Office" are fairly interchangeable. And strangely, we look forward to them conducting KILL BILL PT. ONE type mayhem, yet they actually use relatively little screentime showing them in action. There is one short, effective scene of their own brand of interrogation...but mostly we have to take the word of other characters (like Hitler himself) that these guys are wreaking havoc on the Nazis.

And during one jarring moment, we are introduced to one of the basterds with a blast of `70s era Blaxploitation music and a `70s era title card. Why? Yes, it was funny...but it took everyone totally out of the spell the movie was weaving. Just as having Michael Myers, in thick but unconvincing makeup, play a British officer hatching a scheme to blow up a movie theater, was very distracting. Myers accent is impeccable, and he plays the part straight...but he's still unmistakably Myers and many audience members snickered when they recognized him. Very distracting.

It's as though Tarantino doesn't quite believe that he can make a straightforward film and have it be riveting. Too bad...because when he gets out of his own way (as he mostly does in the climactic sequences of the film), INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS is a cinematic treat. The gorgeous settings and lovely costumes even gave Tarantino a chance to show off and have it fit the tone of the film...but he still insists on going off the rails. "Hey, this is a Tarantino movie!" he seems to want to shout at us. And this causes him to get in the way of the stunning Melanie Laurant, who plays the vengeful theater owner. I've never seen her before, and she is an entrancing presence, whether in casual slacks or a gorgeous formal red dress. She dominates the final portions of the film.

I had a great time at this film, and I recommend it fairly highly. But with 10 minutes less of the sometimes too clever dialogue and 5 minutes less of Tarantino's showboating, and we might have had a true classic of suspense. See it, though, because the two performances I mentioned are worth the price of admission...heck, the opening scene is worth it.
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242 of 310 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WARNING: This movie may not be what you are expecting..., December 21, 2009
This movie is really pretty outstanding. The opening scene is intense, frightening, shocking, and appauling all at once, and it sets up the entire film perfectly. I really had no expectations for this movie because I had read so many mixed reviews and none of them really said anything, so I actually thought this was a really good movie although a bit drawn out. The film is artfully done beautifully shot and extremely well acted.

Now here's why you may not like this quite as much as I did and why my wife absolutely HATED it.

What most expected from this movie:
1- Gore, action, and more gore and more action
2- A story that follows the Basterds as they wreak havoc on Hitler's army
3- Maybe a few subtitles as the film does take place in France after all
4- Classic Quentin Tarantino comedic dialogue

What the film actually is:
1- A character driven story HEAVY on dialogue and other than the last 20 minutes extremely light on action with a couple pretty graphic gory bits tossed in. The last 20 minutes is extremely graphic and violent.
2- The story largely follows the young Jewish girl/woman who escapes the opening scene. The Basterds are just kind of there as an afterthought because they are planning to blow up the same theater.
3- This film is conservatively speaking about 80% subtitled and spoken either in German or French.
4- The only part that is really funny (and it is hilarious) is Brad Pitt "speaking" Italian so poorly that Helen Keller could have picked him out as the American in the crowd.

I've read negative reviews about how this film is "war porn" and diminishes U.S. veterans in some way, but this couldn't be further from the truth. First of all this film is pure fiction that just happens to take place during WWII in France. Nothing depicted in this film is based in any way on fact. It is a complete fantasy of what could have possibly happened if Hitler and all the Nazi upper echelon had all decided to go to a jewish owned movie theater to watch a propaganda film.

Overall it is an extremely well made film that does just about everything well. It is a little bit drawn out at over 2.5 hours but like I said it is very well done and the acting is superb. 4.5 stars. I'd recommend it but be sure to have an open mind.

***Update***
My wife wants to watch it again. She thinks that maybe due to the fact that we started this at about 2:00 am might have had an effect on her opinion. We'll see. For me personally after a second viewing I like it even more.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tarantino is one talented, er, basterd!, December 5, 2011
By 
J.D. Guinness (Kelowna, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Inglourious Basterds (DVD)
Given his bizarre, genre-twisting reputation, Quentin Tarantino's "Inglourious Bastereds" impresses most with its decidedly old-fashioned suspense scenes!

Everyone knows about Christoph Waltz, but to me the real standout performance here is Melanie Laurent as the cinema proprietor, a real study in subtlety and total immersion in a role. And of course Brad Pitt is a reliable crowd-pleaser as Aldo Raine (Fave moment: When Pitt, already in close-up, leans forward and says "Ah WILL have mah SCALPS!" Terrific)

This is as good as everyone says, and makes for a magnificently entertaining movie night. One you'll long remember.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A dizzying film loses its focus . . . what about the Basterds?, February 22, 2010
By 
Scott Schiefelbein (Portland, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
The legend of "Inglorious Basterds," QT's long-germinating WWII epic, is as entertaining as the movie itself. That's not a criticism. Newspaper and Internet stories have dangled tantalizing tales of Tarantino nurturing this script along - it will be a four-hour epic, it will be a miniseries a la "Band of Brothers," it will be a tribute to "The Dirty Dozen," it will be Tarantino's greatest film, etc.

*** Beware mild spoilers ensue *** (in case you've been under a rock and don't know how the movie ends)

Perhaps no film could have lived up to the hype of "Basterds," but amazingingly, the opening scene does just that. Using QT's hallowed practice of dividing the movie into chapters, the movie opens with "Once Upon a Time in Nazi Occupied France." A riveting scene of pure dialogue ensues - a masterpiece of tension as the "Jew Hunter," Nazi Colonel Hans Landa (a fantastic Christoph Waltz, destined for a best-supporting actor Oscar) interrogates a French dairy farmer suspected of harboring Jews. Using a diabolical combination of charm, sincerity, and honesty, Landa establishes himself as one of the great film villains of the new century. A lone survivor of his raid, Shosanna (Melanie Laurent) flees to Paris to open a film theater (natch).

We then meet the Basterds, led by Lt. Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt). Raine is one of those redneck war gods you see so often in the movies. Maybe it's because so many films get made by non-Southerners, but it's a cliche of WWII films that if you have a soldier from the South, he's going to be a crack marksman and natural-born soldier (see Barry Pepper's character in "Saving Private Ryan"). Raine is equally motivated by sadism, as he and the Basterds are going to parachute into Europe and kill Nazis with such barbarism that the Nazis "will be sickened by us, and they will fear us."

QT thereby sets an exquisite table, but then shockingly refuses to serve the meal. For long stretches of the movie, you wonder, "where are the Basterds?" In "The Dirty Dozen," one of QT's all-time favorite movies, you fall in love with the scruffy band of murderers and cut-throats watching them achieve their unique brand of bizarre greatness. As a result, the final scene at the Nazi chateau combines both terrific action and wonderful exploitation of the bond we have forged with the characters.

"Basterds" looks a thousand times better than "Dozen," and Tarantino has written some exquisite scenes. And yet, by the time of the climactic scene at Shosanna's movie theater - which cleverly uses film to defeat Hitler - I could not name any of the Basterds involved in the mission other than Raine. Indeed, a couple of Basterds appear to be on a suicide mission, yet we have not seen any discussion of who these guys are and why they would be motivated to make that supreme sacrifice. While the easy answer is, "because they're killing Nazis," but there's nothing in the film that indicates these guys are motivated by anything approaching Bushido - these guys are in Europe to kill Nazis and to keep killing Nazis . . . something that's hard to do if you're committing suicide.

One of the hardest things to do in writing a book or making a movie is deciding what to leave in and what to leave out. Authors often lament leaving favorite characters and subplots out of stories because they don't work in the overall scheme. In "Basterds," QT left in some stuff that's darn good but distracts from the overall work - you can't make a movie called "Basterds" and not have the audience fall in love with the guys. But QT doesn't give us time to do that.

Ultimately, this movie has some of the finest scenes of suspense of any war movie (particularly a war movie that doesn't have any real battlefield scenes). There are also scenes of pure visual artistry. And there are some terrific performances. But as a whole, the movie does not exceed the sum of its parts. It is a case study in What Might Have Been.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movie at a better price, DC issues fixed!, January 10, 2012
Bought this combo pack on Day 1, only to be dismayed that the Digital Copy code did not work in iTunes as advertised. Thankfully, the issue has now been resolved, and now the DC codes will work until the end of the year. My review has been adjusted to reflect this fact. I think this is a fantastic deal as you get one of the best movies released in the past five years on all three formats for a great price. Another word to the wise, though: only buy one of the Universal 100th Anniversary combo packs at a time. Each one comes with an offer code for their sweepstakes with a guaranteed minimum prize of $3 off your next 100th Anniversary combo pack purchase. If you're a movie fanatic like me, the savings could add up quick.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AWESOME!!!, January 12, 2013
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This review is from: Inglourious Basterds (Amazon Instant Video)
I just watched Django and it was amazing and so I had to backtrack because every interview I read about Django this movie was brought up in discussion about how awesome it and they were right, I was very entertained two thumbs up!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WWII as Spaghetti Western, January 9, 2013
In 1978 Enzo Castellano made a movie called Inglorious Bastards. In 1968 Sergio Leone made a paen to Westerns, called Once upon a Time in the West. In that same year, McLaglen made The Devil's Brigade. In 1960 John Wayne made The Alamo. These are a good enough start if you desire something approaching a full appreciation of Tarantino's sixth film, Inglorious Basterds.

Tarantino changes spellings as a veil: here he is using an "e". He uses Enzo as himself in a cameo. The opening score is nothing less than "The Green Fields of Summer", of John Wayne's own version of "The Alamo". It is used to great effect against the wide screen, black background and yellow block font. We are now framed for action.

The opening script announces two things: Firstly, we are only in a fairy tale, albeit one from the Brothers Grimm. "Once upon a time"... it begins, as does many a tale. Secondly, this opening script moves quickly to the little house on the prairie where Leone did his homage to (at least twelve) American Westerns. We see a father and his children with a menacing intrusion in gray; rats in the milk again, but motorized. The Nazi Colonel allows one Jew to escape. She foreshadows, more like mirrors, the habit of the Tennessee Lieutenant who release a lone Nazi, granted life to broadcast and to amplify the infamy of the Apache Resistance.

We are not in a World War II movie, not yet. We are in the Western for the first two of the five chapters of classical dramatic form. The music is now that of Sergio Leone's faithful composer, Ennio Morricone. The stark guitar is his trademark spaghetti western of Clint Eastwood's journeyman years. What do we hear but the unmistakable quotations from Beethoven's Fur Elise in a second theme. Not bad at all. But he does have Brad Pitt as Lieutenant. Aldo Raine, which is a more or less thinly veiled reference to Aldo Ray for his movies like Battle Cry. My last memory of him is in one of the last of the John Wayne movies, The Green Berets. He is either Muldoon or McDaniel; they are hard to keep straight. In another direction, Tarantino found that German actors, good as they are, had real trouble coping with his writing style. It is unnatural and written for poetic effect in phrasing and cadence. He found a fine Viennese actor, Christoph Waltz, to play Colonel Landa.

So Morricone and his "Dopo La Condenna", from the 1954 "Battle of Algiers", is the music for us to meet the Apache Resistance. The American Lieutenant sports a big red flint knap shoulder patch of the infamous Devil's Brigade. They were the First Special Service Force, formed from the superbly trained Canadian-American Commandos. This man is no slouch. Soon, you see the Bear Jew, Apache style, using his baseball bat as a war club to pound his enemy into bony jelly, as happened to Custer's savage crew. Boots are yanked off as a further indignity, true to history. Scalping is depicted in a relatively dainty fashion.

By Chapter three, we have left Tarantino's Western homage behind to focus on the movies of Europe in those days. First we see the marquee in Paris being stripped of Leni Riefenstahl. Leni was Hitler's darling and the only one Goebels could not get around. Later, we are treated to one of the best Hitler impersonations you will ever see. Then we see WB Pabst (the joke here is that Pabst was a German director who fled to Warner Brothers when Hitler popped up). And Pierre Fresnay film "L'assassin Habile ... au 21" about a serial killer, as Tarantino is never, ever heavy-handed in telegraphing where he is going. Mike Meyers cartoons for us the classic British wry senior officer in the map room briefing the cocky young pup as Churchill looks on.

Operation Kino unifies the Basterds with the little girl who escaped in the fairy tale climax. We are in yet another Tarantino time warp as Kino was founded in 1977, and had the good sense to make available to our scrappy writer/director many of the films that formed his cinematic sensibilities with the great catalogues of classic European film. From here on, we are in a new homage, this one to the great WWII films of the 1960's. Pulp Fiction stars Harvey Keitel appears as the disembodied voice on the phone at the end, while Samuel L. Jackson narrates. That is as far as I can take you. I leave you baited for a deliciously trademark Tarantino moment of absurdity: Hitler asks one of his guards for a stick of gum.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just short of greatness...this is the Tarantino that I like the best!, February 23, 2014
"Inlgourious Basterds", despite what some critics have written, is, I believe, the best of Tarantino's writing so far. The man stated in interviews that he felt it was his best writing thus far, and I agree with him--the passion for movies really shows up here. I don't like comparing his work to his previous or future efforts because they are all a little bit different in many places. But, really, the writing and imagination is on spot here, with elements of satire, horror, mystery, and violence all thrown together into one great exploitation hodgepodge that works every time. This one feels very much like a movie to me, and that makes all the difference! I keep thinking of a film like "To Be or Not to Be" by Mel Brooks (a remake, no less), and this film reminds me of what I liked about that film. Here, Tarantino has not abandoned his sense of humor, and the scenes are much more patiently written and equally intense. Maybe I like it a lot more because it is like a love letter to the movies--and historical accuracy (and all these complaints about misrepresentations of war crimes on racist oriented grounds) is not what counts here. I was skeptical at first about the casting of Brad Pitt and Eli Roth, but I enjoyed them both here, probably because they entered into it with a sense of humor as well. It might be absurd in its plot, but the complaints about the film including multi-lingual scenes with subtitles are unfounded because this is what great fun cinema is about. I enjoy the films set in World War 2, even though is a complete fantasy, but it's revenge story is pretty neat--Pitt is hilarious in this film, and even though the Americans (and Jewish-Americans) vs. the Nazis calls up the same old simple-minded views about good and evil in the human heart, one never gets the sense that "Inglourious Basterds" is supposed to be harmful--it's just well-paced, violent, and memorable good times, taking a pretty strong satirical view of revenge.
The DVD is a bit light on the extras (no commentary track from a historian or even Tarantino, that would have been neat), but I may eventually spring for the 2-disc for this one, and I usually don't care too much about the extras on Tarantino's films. Overall, though, I had no problems with my disc, and the picture and sound were fantastic. I'm kind of sorry that I passed this one up when it was out at the theaters, but I feared another "Pulp Fiction" or "Reservoir Dogs"--this one is certainly more distinguished (and less brutally profane) than those other two. B+
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars If you're expecting a non-stop,action-packed, gory-epic...prepare to be disappointed., May 26, 2012
For many years, Tarantino had this film partly written, but never could think of way to finish it, as well as finding time to fit it into his schedule of projects. There were rumors of Sly Stallone and Arnold playing characters, before production, but Quentin shot those down.

People were hoping "Inglorious Basterds" would be something on the scale of "Saving Private Ryan", but sadly, that is not what this film is. In fact, this film is not historically, accurate. It follows a group of Jewish-American soldiers hunting Nazi's and ultimately, plotting a massive explosion in a cinema premiere, which has all the high-ranking German officers (including, Hitler). There is another story being told in the film of a young Jewish woman, who runs the cinema and plots her own revenge on the Nazis that killed her family.

There many great actors and performances in the film, all elevated by Tarantio's witty dialouge and skilled direction. Christopher Waltz is fantastic (and deserved that Oscar), as well as Brad Pitt and Diane Kruger. Unfortunately, like many of Tarantino's films, there is A LOT of dialogue scenes, with small graphic violence thrown, in between. Not just dialogue, but subtitles all over the place. Expect a lot of reading, which is a shame, because this is a beautiful film to look at.

There are some great moments in the film, especially, the intense opening scene, involving Christopher Waltz invading a farmhouse, as well as the bar shoot-out scene with Michael Fassbender.

But like I warned, this a dialogue-heavy film. If you've seen Tarantino's other films, don't expect the pacing of "Kill Bill vol. 1", but more of "Kill Bill vol. 2". The pacing of "Basterds" feels slow. It's not as tedius, as "Death Proof" or "Jackie Brown", but at times, it almost feels that way.

Tarantino has certainly, grown as a filmmaker, in the way he constructs and shoots scenes. The colors and the compositions he uses in his imagery have quite the impact.

I'm a big fan of "Pulp Fiction" and the Kill Bill films and enjoyed, "Resevior Dogs" and there's no question that Quentin can write and direct, however he should be careful to not be so engrossed with his ability to do so. His love and knowledge of film, as well as his dialogue skills, are kind of impeding on story-telling. Also, there is a lack of balance of dialogue\action, which hurts the pacing.

Yes, this is not the grand, WWII epic we thought Tarantino was going to make. What he did make, is still entertaining and worth watching, for the performances, alone.
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Inglourious Basterds
Inglourious Basterds by Quentin Tarantino
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