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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book over all, not as good as the first two
I thought Inkdeath was a good book, but it was not nearly as good as the first two. For some reason, Funke chose to give Meggie a much less important role, taking most of the character's depth away as well. I think this was one of the only things that took away from the book. The beginning was also really boring, and the characters were so untrue to their roles in past...
Published on October 19, 2008 by Kathryn Kramer

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84 of 99 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sad to see it end this way--spoilers
Perhaps this book is payback for Cornelia Funke allowing filmmakers to destroy "Inkheart" for their, I don't know, convenience maybe, a la "Eragon." This book reads as though Ms. Funke struggled with the burden of tying up a thousand loose ends in her immense story-world, struggled and surrendered.

I was the reader who brought to life the "Inkheart" trilogy,...
Published on January 2, 2009 by Amazon Customer


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84 of 99 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sad to see it end this way--spoilers, January 2, 2009
By 
Amazon Customer (Orinda, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
Perhaps this book is payback for Cornelia Funke allowing filmmakers to destroy "Inkheart" for their, I don't know, convenience maybe, a la "Eragon." This book reads as though Ms. Funke struggled with the burden of tying up a thousand loose ends in her immense story-world, struggled and surrendered.

I was the reader who brought to life the "Inkheart" trilogy, reading aloud to my family. We came to love the Inkworld in all its rich detail, warmly fleshed-out characters, and fairy tale roster of fantasy creatures. We enjoyed indulging in the Inkworld despite all of the author's wrong turns, and anyone who read the first two books may feel the same.

The first book was marvelous, enthralling. The second, even more consuming, we couldn't wait for reading time each night, though I had to omit large portions of Ms. Funke's gore from the reading to little ears (while also deleting myriad "good heavens" and other too-frequently repeated phrases, perhaps unfortunate artifacts of the translation from German).

With "Inkdeath," the characters' continual despair and sadness through the first one-half of the book became a running joke with my audience. It got to the point where every time they heard the words "despair," or "cry," my listeners laughed out loud. Yes, 300 pages were too many to establish that life sucks inside a dark story. Real people find ways to cope. Storybook people should too.

Ms. Funke's Inkworld departed the second volume, "Inkspell," with a fistful of teasers. Orpheus entered the Inkworld, Dustfinger departed, leaving devoted Farid desperate to conjure him back. The Adderhead was left immortal, an untenable situation, while Cosimo, his double and his father were all dead, Lombrica taken over by Argenta. Fenoglio and all the Folcharts were inside the Inkworld, save the ultimate book fanatic Elinor. Basta was dead, but Mortola was still at large.

Ms. Funke concealed from us, in "Inkspell," Mo's sabotage of the book of immortality and anticipation that the villain's demise was imminent. Why she withheld this key detail until "Inkdeath" is hard to understand, unless she conceived it in the interim. We had been left wondering why Mo would do such a towering wrong as to hand the story's arch villain endless life, with only a vague notion of undoing it someday. Otherwise, the act was selfish and inconsistent with his character.

"Inkspell" was a fascinating exploration of the idea of entering the very story that one is reading. One of the most intriguing elements was how the author, Fenoglio, failed in his attempts to control the Inkworld by writing more pieces for his mystically endowed readers to bring to life. Fenoglio underestimated the complexity of the world he imagined, failed repeatedly to grasp how his book (or the readers) had merely set a world in motion, a world rapidly gaining its own logically consistent life.

From this point, Ms. Funke chose to spend the entirety of "Inkdeath" marching ponderously toward the undoing of the Adderhead's immortality. She struggles with the scale of her story and loses many of her characters along the way. Entire chapters are wasted telling us how Elinor pines to join her relations in the Inkworld, the reader Darius conveniently nearby as the obvious setup for what comes next. Meggie, central character of the first two novels, is a cardboard cutout of her former self, with a new and entirely irrelevant love interest perhaps serving as an apology for why she's uninvolved in deciding how this whole thing turns out. Farid never even puts up a fight to keep her. Clearly, Ms. Funke lost interest in these characters, which is offensive to readers who came to love them.

Obviously Dustfinger comes back, but not by the fast-turning-trite path of the reader's art, not by Fenoglio's reworking, or via Orpheus's manipulations. This is a fine turn by Ms. Funke, reviving Dustfinger with strings attached, not violating the strictures that had prevented Fenoglio from necromancing his beloved Cosimo.

But in the end, Dustfinger's presence is pretty much a distraction. We never get an enduring reunion of Dustfinger with his wife, Roxane, no full reconciliation between Dustfinger and his daughter Brianne. Dustfinger does little to decide the conclusion and acts pretty much as a red herring.

The wondrous innovation of "Inkheart" was Mortimer Folchart, the book doctor whose voice had unpredictable, dangerous power when used to read aloud. His voice...did it open the door to a world that already existed, or did it give life to the otherwise dead printed word? Rich innovation by Ms. Funke, wasted thereafter. Throughout the rest of the series, Mo never again used the power of his voice to do anything. Appalling oversight. Conceivably, Mo could have read characters out of any book that existed in the Inkworld, but that avenue was unexplored.

Instead, other readers--Meggie, Orpheus, even the milquetoast Darius--were allowed to perform the act with increasing nonchalance. Ms. Funke merely dismissed the previously ominous risks involved--you know, the one that deposited Resa Folchart into the Inkworld in the first place. How did those risks change when reading about the same story that one was inside? We never learned.

Many pages are wasted on Fenoglio turned pathetic drunk lost in his failures, when any author would more likely remain endlessly fascinated with the ability to interact with characters he himself had written. This is a plot conceit used by Ms. Funke to pad a story that needed no padding, had plenty of characters to explore. She temporarily suspended Fenoglio's ability to write so as to explain why he wasn't trying to regain control of his story. Fenoglio already had experienced spectacular failure; no need to waste thousands of words explaining why he might be having a hard time deciding what to do next.

Instead of indulging in her most developed characters, Ms. Funke elaborates on Orpheus, Princess Violante, and her awful son Jacopo.

Violante has to be fleshed out if she's to inherit rule over the Inkworld once her father passes. All in all, she is a bore. Jacopo goes from being an annoyance to taking some of the most decisive actions in the entire series. The story turns on Jacopo! Perhaps the author thought this clever. Depriving the story's better characters of these significant actions left them lacking. Surely Dustfinger, or the Black Prince, deserved a hand in deciding the outcome.

Orpheus is a satisfyingly repugnant villain whose end never comes, leaving open the future of this series. This is hard to stomach. Given that everyone remains to live in Fenoglio's story, why wouldn't Orpheus continue to torment them with distortions of Fenoglio's words? After 683 pages, "Inkdeath" comes to an abrupt halt without resolving any but the most obvious plotlines.

Ms. Funke was so good at departing from convention in her first two books, I wish she had done so again and dispatched the Adderhead within the first hundred pages of "Inkdeath." Life after his passing should have been the conclusion that got fleshed out. The battle between Orpheus and Fenoglio to write the future of the Inkworld! The largely forgotten argument over how and when to return to the real world! What becomes of Dustfinger and Roxane! Meggie's potential as reader and writer, hinted at in "Inkspell" but never elaborated! The story that should have been written all got crammed into a few dismissive paragraphs at the end.

I thank Cornelia Funke for creating this wonderful set of people and places. They are powerful fuel for any good imagination, and for many years my family and I will keep the Inkworld alive in our minds, working to imagine where this story could have gone.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book over all, not as good as the first two, October 19, 2008
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
I thought Inkdeath was a good book, but it was not nearly as good as the first two. For some reason, Funke chose to give Meggie a much less important role, taking most of the character's depth away as well. I think this was one of the only things that took away from the book. The beginning was also really boring, and the characters were so untrue to their roles in past books that they hardly seemed like the same characters at all. Other than that, I think the book was extremely well written, with many new engaging characters to enjoy. The ending was satisfactory, and the plot well thought out and exciting. I just wish Funke hadn't changed the characters themselves to fit the plot.
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74 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funke is on a serious roll, September 26, 2008
By 
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
I love the Inkheart trilogy, I seriously can't get enough of it! I must admit at first I was somewhat reluctant to read the conclusion to the trilogy, afraid it might be a letdown as most serie-enders are becoming, but it was as excellent as the first and second books (not to mention the breathtaking cover). Its excellently paced, descriptive, suspenseful, and keeps you flipping the pages, just salivating for the finish. I admit it started a little slow in my opinion, but it definitely picked up and kept my interest; I just couldn't put it down. I don't really want to give anything away, except that this is an amazing book, and you cannot miss out on it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful ending to the Inkheart trilogy - for both kids and adults, February 3, 2009
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
Having read Inkheart, Inkspell, and now Inkdeath, I can say with absolute certainty that Cornelia Funke is a wonderful author.

Inkdeath is the conclusion to the Inkheart trilogy and well worth the wait.

It wraps up the story line in an interesting and action packed manner and was truly a joy to read.

My 10 year old daughter is currently reading Inkheart - the first book in the trilogy - and is totally entranced. I can't wait to see what she thinks of the remaining two novels.

I don't want to mention exactly what happens in the book as it would take too much away from the enjoyment of actually reading it but suffice it to say that it is great for both children and adults.

I'm a 36 year old dad and I highly recommend this book and this trilogy.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sad that it is over, October 6, 2008
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
This was a really good ending to the series! I loved all the twists the story took. It was like riding with a giant and you have no idea where it is going to take you but you don't want to be left out of the excitement. I am sad that these books are over because I grew up with them. Cornelia Funke is one of my all time favorite authors and I hope to read more by her in the future. Thank you Cornelia Funke for one of the best rides that books can give!
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38 of 52 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring and an unsatisfying read, November 15, 2008
By 
Clariable (Pasadena, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
I had great hopes for this book. When I heard that it had been released I could barely contain my excitement at finally being able to read this book. Now after reading it, I have to say that I was extremely disappointed and dissatisfied.

Inkheart is an amazing story; I loved how it was about the power of the written word and books in general. But in Inkdeath, all of the magic is gone! Meggie Folchart was the protagonist of Inkheart and so the natural assumption is that she is the main character of the whole series. Clearly, she's not or I wouldn't be mentioning it. In Inkspell other characters start to have larger roles, certain things start to revolve around them, and more chapters are told from their perspectives. Yet Meggie is still an integral part of the story. However, in Inkdeath, the heroes are other people, like Mo and Resa. Meggie does absolutely NOTHING!!!! The whole book is 660 pages of boring NOTHING! It was a really boring story and I really disliked how all (& I mean all) of the characters were portrayed. For one, Mo is entirely different. He actually doesn't want to leave the Inkworld and he acts irrationally all of the time. Farid becomes a jerk. Resa is annoying. Maggie is a weak, useless little side character who sits weepy on the sidelines. And other characters become annoying fools too.

Cornelia Funke takes too long to make a point in this story. The ending is predictable - most of the evil is vanquished! Yay! - but the story still doesn't end on a satisfying note. As I said before, it was boring. I can't get over it. I kept waiting for Meggie to do something, for example, write something herself independent of Fenoglio to affect change and save everybody. In the last eighth of the book I finally began to give up hope and it came crashing down on me that this book was disappointing. I mutinously wished that Cornelia had never written a sequel to the wonderful Inkheart, because even though I loved Inkspell, as a cliff-hanger, it was nothing without an awesome final book and Inkdeath was not it.

So, though I fervently recommend Inkheart to any bibliophile, Inkdeath gets 2 stars from me because it lacks anything really interesting. You needn't bother reading it. If you've read Inkheart and Inkspell already, don't go on to Inkdeath so that you can remember those books and those characters with fondness.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful ending to a wonderful trilogy!, December 30, 2008
By 
JoJo (Washington state) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) (Hardcover)
I got this book for Christmas and just started reading it yesterday, and I finished it this afternoon! I could not put it down. The book is wonderfully well-written and I couldn't have asked for a better ending.

The beginning of the book starts off a bit slow, and luckily there is an "A to Z of Inkheart" in the back to remind you of who all the characters are (since it does get a little confusing), but even considering this the story captivated me just as it did in Inkheart and Inkspell. Funke has written an exciting conclusion to this series.

I don't know about you, but I like to get lost in the books I read, and these books definitely did that for me. Funke's writing captures the heart and keeps you on the edge of your seat all the way to the end. Great writing, and highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved It, November 20, 2008
By 
Lois (Huntington, WV, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is an excellent ending to the trilogy. I can't wait for the movie!! The only problem I had was all three books are narrated by three different people. They all did wonderfully, but I really think Brendan Fraser did the best and it was really hard to transition from Brendan Fraser (Inkspell) to Allan Corduner(Inkdeath). I wish they would put out a set with Brendan Fraser reading all three books. It was really enchanting.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Depressing Disappointment, April 3, 2009
This review is from: Inkdeath (Hardcover)
We found this book to be a huge disappointment. I have read the first 2 books in the trilogy(Inkspell and Inkheart) out-loud to my 8 and 10 year old daughters at night before bed. We all enjoyed the first two very much. We started reading Inkdeath. The story is slow, depressing, and more suited for adults than for children. We read over half of the book and my daughters asked if we could stop reading it and pick a different book, which we have done. I'm sorry that Inkdeath did not make us care enough about the characters to plod through the sad, dark story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I was very disappointed with this one, June 29, 2009
By 
J. Maxon (Minnesota, USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Inkdeath (Paperback)
In the first book, , we had twelve-year-old Meggie Folchart learn about her father's amazing ability to read things out of books. Unfortunately one of these things was the evil Capricorn who captures her father in an attempt to force him to do his will. This story takes place entirely in the "real world."

Next we had Inkspell, where Farid convinced Meggie to read them into the book "Inkheart" so that he could see Dustfinger again. Joining them shortly after is Mo and Teresa, who get there by means of Orpheus. They learn about The Adderhead and Mo is forced to make him immortal. This story takes place mostly in the "Inkworld."

Now we have the conclusion to the Inkheart Trilogy. This tale takes place mostly in the "Inkworld," but we jump back and forth to the "real world" to see what's happening to Elinor and Darius.

Story overview:
---------------
Fenoglio may have stopped writing, but Orpheus has taken over where Fenoglio left off. However, the things Orpheus creates are less than ideal. The Folchart's (Meggie, Mortimer & Teresa) are now living with the Black Prince and his gang of robbers, with Mo fulfilling the role of the Bluejay as the prince's right-hand man. Farid on the other hand is working with Orpheus until the man can bring Dustfinger back from the dead.

Orpheus tricks Mo to call on The White Women and Mo finds himself making a deal with Death (who happens to be the same Death in all worlds) to kill The Adderhead whom he had made immortal. The price of failure is the death of him, his daughter, and Dustfinger whom was allowed to return to help with the task.

The Adderhead's daughter, Violante helps Mo in an attempt to kill her tyrannical father. Things don't work out as planned and it comes down to Fenoglio's words verses Orpheus's as they battle against each other from opposite sides of the kingdom.

My thoughts:
-------------
Having liked Inkheart, and even more so Inkspell, I was very disappointed with this one. I think the story is OK, it is just extremely drawn out in long and boring scenes, tons of back story, and the reader is in and out of so many character heads that it is bound to make our own head spin. It wasn't until Chapter 25 that I actually started to get into the story, and then a few chapters later it started to lose me again. Cornelia did to Inkdeath what Paolini did to Brisingr, however I was less bored with Brisingr. That said, I still recommend reading it if you have started the series. It had a satisfying ending and filled in most of the loose ends. Keep in mind that some of my distastes may be coming more from the author in me than the reader in me.

James D. Maxon
Author of Traphis: A Wizard's Tale
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Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy)
Inkdeath (Inkheart Trilogy) by Cornelia Funke (Hardcover - October 7, 2008)
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