Inkheart 2009 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(281) IMDb 6.1/10
Available in HD

Meggie's father has a wonderful talent: When he reads aloud, the characters literally come to life, an ability he discovered while he read from the story Inkheart.

Starring:
Brendan Fraser, Andy Serkis
Runtime:
1 hour 47 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Inkheart

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Inkheart (+ BD-Live) [Blu-ray]

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Adventure, Kids & Family
Director Iain Softley
Starring Brendan Fraser, Andy Serkis
Supporting actors Eliza Bennett, Richard Strange, Paul Bettany, Helen Mirren, Matt King, Steve Speirs, Jamie Foreman, Stephen Graham, Mirabel O'Keefe, Andy Serkis, John Thomson, Lesley Sharp, Tereza Srbová, Rafi Gavron, Jennifer Connelly, Jim Broadbent, Roger Allam, Matthew Bower
Studio New Line
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

My kids love this movie and watch it over and over.
Tamara Hughes
It's too bad they never made the other two books into a movie, I would have enjoyed seeing them too..
Pat Smith
The movie is very well done and great for the whole family!
James F.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

97 of 110 people found the following review helpful By C.J. Darlington on February 8, 2009
Ever wish Narnia or Middle Earth were real? Or that you really could sit down to coffee with Jo March or Anne of Green Gables? What if anything you read came out of the book and into your world?

People with this gift exist in Inkheart. They're called Silvertongues, and some of them don't even know they have this ability, like Mo Folchart (Brendan Fraser). One night when he reads from a novel called Inkheart to his wife and three-year-old daughter, more than one villainous character suddenly appears out of the book, and his wife suddenly disappears into the book.

Mo has never read aloud again, and for nine years he's searched tirelessly for another rare copy of Inkheart in the hopes that somehow he can read his wife back out. His daughter Meggie (Eliza Bennett) is now twelve and travels Europe with her father, a bookbinder, from bookstore to bookstore. She doesn't know why her Mom abandoned them. She doesn't even know what her father's searching for. But she soon finds out when a strange man named Dustfinger confronts Mo, demanding to be read back into Inkheart. The adventure soon takes both of them into the wilds of Italy, and along the way they make friends and enemies, discovering more than they wish about themselves and the magic of Inkheart.

Based on a novel by Cornelia Funke, Inkheart is a wonderful tribute to the power of story and the love of reading. It's hard to see why its been lambasted by many critics, because all the elements of a great family-friendly film are here in full force. Its reverence for books shows kids that reading is magical and books are to be treasured. The fantasy adventure taps into a thriving market that's already been developed by Harry Potter and Narnia.

Inkheart features several noteworthy actors and actresses.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Bayfia on September 14, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Inkheart was quite a surprise for me. I was not sure from the movie title if the film would be worth watching, but after watching it, I have to say it's one of the best fantasy films I've seen in quite awhile! The acting is superb, the story line is marvelous, and the creativity present in the story development was wonderful. There's plenty of action, some very interesting twists, and a great outcome. I felt good after watching this film, and excited to share it with friends. It kept me guessing every step of the way. Awesome film ... one I will watch again and again!
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pandolfi on January 26, 2009
Some have criticized "Inkheart" for sending the wrong message about reading, as if it was warning children that opening a book will lead to disastrous results. I saw it differently; to me, "Inkheart" sends a wonderful message about the imagination of writers and the power they have to create and/or destroy entire worlds. When the forces of evil become overpowering, the writer regains control with a few strokes of a pen (or, more modernly, a few clicks on a keyboard). Far be it from me to want to sound corny, but as a writer myself, I respond well to stories that are about stories. Based on the German novel by Cornelia Funke, "Inkheart" is creative and fun, a fantasy about fantasy becoming reality. It tells the story of Mortimer Folchart (Brendan Fraser), a father who possesses the ability to bring forth characters from books simply by reading aloud. But there's a catch: If someone from the story crosses over into our world, then someone from our world has to cross over into the story.

Such a thing happened to Mortimer's beloved wife, Risa, as he was reading from the pages of a novel called "Inkheart." Nine years later, he and his twelve-year-old daughter, Meggie (Eliza Bennett), continue to search the world for a copy of that book, which has long since gone out of print. If he can find one, he'll finally be able to read his wife out of the story. He and Meggie finally find one in a quaint bookshop in the middle of Italy. It's there that they run into Dustfinger (Paul Bettany), a juggler who has the ability to start fires with his own hands. As it turns out, he's a character from "Inkheart," and he's spent the last nine years following Mortimer with the hope that he can get him back into the story.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on January 24, 2009
Have you ever become so immersed in a book that it seemed to come to life?

Suppose it really did. That premise underlies this enchanted fantasy story. I have to admit, the movie's basic passion for the written word spoke to something inside me. So did the libraries of whispering books, which brought to life something that had only been metaphorically real for me before, and so did the girl with her own zeal for reading and aspirations toward writing. On top of that, I was somewhat tickled to see the best of today's movie making effect-meisters putting so much effort into this tribute to the low tech pleasure of reading.

Given that magical beginning, the story might have become more - but drew me along anyway. The characters never wholly engaged me, though. Even Helen Mirren couldn't quite give her character the drive I might have hoped for. In truth, I was happy to see the effects kick in toward the second half of the movie, to give me visually what the plot wasn't offering.

I confess, I haven't read the book. It seems to have a loyal following, and loyal readers often express disappointment in how their favored scenes and characters appear on the screen. I had the luxury of judging the movie on its own merits, so I generally enjoyed it. Although a bit much for skittish small children, it's a kid-friendly fantasy - and one that works against the view that reading is for nerds.

-- wiredweird, reviewing the theatrical release
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