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Insatiable Hardcover – June 8, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Insatiable
  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (June 8, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006173506X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061735066
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (207 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #993,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Cabot (Princess Diaries) winningly applies her trademark likably fallible protagonists and breezy storytelling to a vampire war in New York City. TV writer Meena Harper creates fabulous plots for Insatiable, the second-highest–rated soap opera, thanks to her burdensome if lucrative psychic ability to see into the future and determine how people are going to die. And just as Insatiable is switching to a vampire theme to attract a younger demographic, a spate of chilling murders-by-exsanguination grips New York City. Enter Lucien Antonescu, a sexy, melancholic Romanian history professor/vampire who recognizes that the murders are the work of rogue vampires who have broken away from his order. (Lucien happens to be the son of Vlad the Impaler, whom Bram Stoker gave such a bad rep.) Lucien's opposition: Alaric Wulf, a sympathetic detective from the Palatine Guard, who hopes to use Meena and her prophetic gift to stop the murders and track down Lucien. Unfortunately for Alaric, Meena is a little in love with Lucien. Cabot is less concerned with creating a convincing family tree for Lucien than with creating sparks between her characters, who feel pleasantly natural even as they live alongside the vampires next door.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The author of the popular Princess Diaries series and Queen of Babble (2006) jumps on the vampire bandwagon. Meena Harper is a young soap opera writer who possesses the power to see how people are going to die. This ability has allowed her to save the lives of those she cares about, but it's also made her something of an outsider. Her dreams of becoming the head writer on her show, Insatiable, are dashed when the job is given to a well-connected rival who wants to add a vampire character to the sudser. Meena is dismayed by the turn of events at work until a mysterious stranger named Lucien rescues her from a bizarre bat attack. Their romance takes off, until a smoldering vampire hunter named Alaric breaks into Meena's apartment and tells her the man she's dating is the prince of darkness. Meena doesn't want to believe her lover is actually a vampire, but the gravity of the situation becomes apparent when she finds herself embroiled in a deadly vampire war. The vampire craze may be reaching the oversaturation point, but this novel's appealing love triangle and Cabot's popularity should draw plenty of readers. --Kristine Huntley

More About the Author

I write! Books for you, your sister, your best friend, your mother . . . . even for men with good taste!

Most of my time is spent over at my website, http://megcabot.com, so be sure to stop by!

UK, New Zealand, and Australia fans, visit http://www.megcabot.co.uk.

Customer Reviews

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  • "Writing" 66
  • "Characters" 58
  • "Funny" 55
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

111 of 128 people found the following review helpful By E. Champion on June 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I am a massive fan of Meg Cabot and her adult books... they're fantastic. I read "Boy Next Door" at least once a year, usually with a glass of wine and a bottle of nail polish. I am imploring you to take me seriously because I sincerely want to save you from reading this book, and lessening your opinion of Meg Cabot.

There are pop culture references that are dry and uninteresting. Mentioning characters like Sookie Stackhouse from True Blood and Edward from True Blood and Buffy doesn't lessen the painfully obvious rip-offs--Meg Cabot's characters are an awkward combination of those three. (And Jon, the funny, down on his luck brother? Jason Stackhouse, anybody?!?!)

Even worse, the plot gets SO RIDICULOUS--I won't spoil it, but please believe me! The plot starts promising and jumps off the deep end. Characters make massive personality changes without much explanation, and the main love interest, Lucien (arguably the only likeable character in the book, although it seems at times that he's BARELY IN IT--what kind of romance has an MIA hero?!) loses all of his appeal in the last few chapters.

Meg Cabot, I love your writing. I will continue to buy your books. Just don't sell out like this!! And if you do, please make the book not quite so stupid.

ALSO: if anyone is looking for a funny, romantic, guilty-pleasure romance writer...try Kerrelyn Sparks. She's wonderful and cheesy, but mostly wonderful.
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful By M. Tanenbaum VINE VOICE on April 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Best-selling young adult author Meg Cabot turns to vampires in this tongue-in-cheek romance novel, published for adults but suitable for her teenage fans as well. It might be a tiny bit racier than her YA novels, but not by much. The story revolves around New York resident and Soap-opera writer Meena Harper, who is sick of the vampire craze going on around us, and is not happy when the powers-that-be on her soap inform her that she's going to have to incorporate a plot line featuring vampires in order to jump-start their ratings. The character of Meena herself fits into the current craze for paranormal fiction, since she has a unique ability to see when people are going to die when she looks at them. This sometimes helps her warn her friends to escape danger, but sometimes nobody believes her warnings. Meena is content living a single life with her brother and her cute little dog, when who should visit her neighbors but a mysterious Romanian prince named Lucien, whom she falls in love with. He's the only one that she can't forsee when he's going to die, but she doesn't realize that it's because he's already dead! Not only is he a vampire, he is the son of the famous Dracula and is the leader of the vampire community--the supreme ruler of the vampires. Will she and Lucien live happily ever after? Cabot tells this story with a tongue-in-cheek sense of humor; for example, when Meena discovers Lucien's true identity, she decides she will write a book to save other women from what she was going through: "Women are from Venus, Vampires are from Hell." The publisher calls it a "modern day sequel to Dracula," although I think it is a book much more for romance readers and Cabot's teenaged fan girls and certainly not for fans of real horror fiction. Recommended for a fun escape novel, perfect as a summer beach read.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Kate Coombs VINE VOICE on April 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I ordered this book thinking it was for teens, and it turns out to be for adults--although older teens might enjoy it, too. (There are a few racy passages.) Meg Cabot's books are always so cheery, whatever their genre, that I just get a kick out of them. Besides, I wanted to watch Cabot poke fun at Twilight and the current rage for vampire stories, which is what the book summary seemed to promise... And yep, Insatiable is pretty much "Buffy meets Bella," with some mind reading thrown in because why not? [Some spoilers below!]

Meena Harper writes for a daytime soap, and she is appalled when she is assigned to write a vampire storyline. "'Vampires,' Meena said. 'Real original, Metzenbaum.' Shoshona stood up, slinging her bag over her shoulder . 'Get over it, Harper. They're everywhere. You can't escape them.'"

Which just might explain why Cabot wrote this book! But Meena doesn't catch on for pages, not until a macho vampire slayer holds her hostage in her apartment, demanding the location of her new boyfriend's pad. That would be the gorgeous Romanian prince Meena thinks is just perfect--until she gets the scoop on his supernatural secret. It turns out Lucien is in New York because he's trying to track down the idiot who's been draining human girls and leaving their corpses around the city, stirring up trouble for the secretive vampire community.

Pretty soon Meena--another of Cabot's feisty heroines--is attracting a lot of vampire attention because of her own secret: when she meets someone, she knows when and how they're going to die. It seems odd to her that she doesn't know this about Lucien (who's already dead); think psychic Sookie Stackhouse and her attraction to seemingly blank-minded vampire Bill.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DM on September 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
With Meg Cabot's 1-800-WHERE-R-U young adult series high on my list of favorite books of all time (for its strong female character and entertaining humor), the only reason I was even tempted to pick up this vampire novel was because of her name on it. I don't trust such novels, because they're usually wish-fulfillment drivel over bloodsuckers that I've never been able to understand. And, at first, it seemed this novel would break the mold. Meena Harper's character started off witty, driven, sympathetic, and interesting, with a psychic gift for predicting the death of other people that had the potential to carry the story all by itself. Even better, her opinion of typical vampire stories in general was the same as mine.

Before, of course, she actually meets a hot vampire. Then she rips off her clothes so fast she probably gave herself rug burn.

This book seemed like it would try to be ironic, then it played out like every vampire novel I've had the joy of flinging against the wall. Meena falls for a (amazingly attractive, disgustingly rich, predictably cultured and tragic) vampire prince and all that fiddle-faddle about common sense, self-respect, and self-preservation go flying out the window, along with her panties. Falling for him, of course, brings a slew of problems, including a crazy vampire hunting zealot, to endanger her and her friends. Meena gets swept up in the mess because she's in love, never mind that the vampire keeps biting her against her will when they have sex, since love apparently means violating your beloved's physical reservations. And, of course, Meena has good reason to believe at several points in the book that her beloved is capable of killing her. He has a temper, you see, an entitlement complex, and very big teeth.
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