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Inside the Cult: A Member's Chilling, Exclusive Account of Madness and Depravity in David Koresh's Compound Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (June 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451180291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451180292
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,610,942 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book, while not a literary masterpiece by any stretch of the imagination, tells my story as it happened. I was a member of the Branch Davidians from 1986 to 1990 and Koresh, who was then Vernon Howell, was a very good friend of mine. After all the publicity, including the siege, fire, and trial, there have been may documentaries and publications claiming to tell the truth about the Branch Davidians. This book pulls no punches. It tells of life in the cult exactly as it was. If you want information about the FBI during the siege, you can get some from this publication, but there have been more thorough works written since then. This book is probably best read in conjunction with one of the more reputable books on the subject.

"Inside the Cult" is told from the inside. It also tells of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms investigation as it unfolded. I kept a rather extensive diary from the beginning of my association with Koresh, to his firey end in April 1993. In addition to the facts, this book also gives the thoughts, perceptions and consequences of various events as they took place. If you want the truth about what the Branch Davidians were really like under Koresh's rule, then this book will give you that information.

I have tried to be objective and accurate. An appendix at the end gives a more thological history of the book. I rate the book 8/10 because it does not include detailed theological information about the group. Why? At the time, I did not thing anyone would be interested. The theology is very complex and detailed. So the book isn't perfect. But I'm on-line, I'm here, and I usually answer whatever questions people have.

Marc Breault, author of Inside the Cult
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 3, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One question that isn't answered is why -- if the Feds wanted David Koresh so much, and if they wanted to "protect the children" as they have claimed ad nauseum -- they didn't arrest Koresh when he was in Waco relatively alone, as he traveled there quite often (and without a lot of people with him).
Doesn't make any sense to me . . . If I was going to stop someone that was allegedly as depraved and as dangerous as he is now made out to be, then I would wait for him to leave the "compound." The Sheriff of Waco, among many others, have said that Koresh had traveled into town quite frequently (and no, he didn't surround himself with human shields). He would have been easy to arrest without fanfare.
The Feds instead chose to bring in a whole "battalion" of folks and create a big media event.
Personally, I wouldn't trust what this guy says in the book.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
One of many of the publications I have researched on the topic of Koresh and Branch Davidians, Included are many questionable allegations, and what I find to be at least one very blatent example of the author's having fabricated a story to cause David Koresh legal problems. It is clear that this book would not have been published as is, were David Koresh alive and able to sue Mr. Breault over several, if not all of Mr. Breault's slanderous and defamatory statements. This book should be read with a BIG grain of salt, if read at all. This book is for those who are hungry for sensationalistic gossip that only a non thinker will blindly accept without question. I found it insulting that Mr. Breault seems to expect that we accept his claims with no proof to back them up, as there is no proof to back his claims. I question his intent, especially regarding a letter the book includes, that Mr. Breault had written from Australia, and had sent to a Texas congressman in 1992. In it, he alleged that the Davidians were a Jonestown type group about to commit suicide on a date Mr. Breault included in the message. The date was a full year before the botched raid in 1993. Now we know who was the first to coin the Jonestown comparison, though in reality there is no justification for this comparison. On the day Mr. Breault claimed this was to happen, the Davidians were engaged in a game of football and were also enjoying go-cart rides. When they heard about Marc's claims they laughed. Mr. Breault has admitted in a court of law that he had a personal vendetta against David Koresh, and also fails to include in his book that he was kicked out of the group for misconduct. Clearly a bias and disgruntled ex-member who cannot be relied upon as a credible witness. There are MUCH better sources for researchers looking into this matter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Miles B. Canning on February 12, 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As one who is interested in the inner workings of mind control in general, and thus the rise and fall of cults in particular, I am finding this account disappointingly incomplete. Currently on page 100, I have yet to come across a basic history of the branch dividians, neither international nor local. Yes, there is a bio on David Koresh. Yes, I understand that he was severely mentally I'll, but how did this cult come to be? No, you can't go into detail about every follower, but what, if anything, did they have in common that made them vulnerable to such destructive and deranged religious nonsense? Stories such as this, whether fiction or non, tend to focus on individual antagonists while glossing over the role played by a support system on which their power depends.
"On his release Vernon employed the acting skills he used so successfully to manipulate his adherents in the cult and, with the help of television, radio, and the print media, became a folk hero. He turned the situation around so that he, and not George, appeared the victim." There is no doubt plenty of documentation in print media on which to refer to expand on this, yet this paragraph is followed by ZERO explanation/illustration on what rhetoric Vernon/Koesh used to "turn the situation around." As he managed to get out of responsibility for a military attack, I find such lack of explanation to be a gaping hole.
I commend Martin King for risking his life to uncover this story, but I find his lack of analysis on the basics of cult psychology to be embarrassingly poor journalism.
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