Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Disturbed $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services TransparentGGWin TransparentGGWin TransparentGGWin  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Gear Up for Football Learn more
Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good copy with moderate cover and page wear from being handled and read. Accessories or dust jacket may be missing. Could be an ex-library copy that will have all the stickers and or marking of the library. Some textual or margin notes and possibly contain highlighting.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Inside the White House Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1996

59 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audible, Unabridged
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$26.91 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this tabloid-sounding account, Kessler (The FBI) has aimed very low, armed with "inside information" provided by presidential aides, servants, staff members and Secret Service agents that has the ring of backstairs gossip. He shows Lyndon Johnson as a vulgar megalomaniac, Nixon as almost pathologically shut in, Carter as a petty nitpicker, Reagan as dominated by his icy wife, Bush as barely able to tolerate people en masse and Clinton as such a compulsive womanizer as to make Jack Kennedy seem celibate. From the chief executive on down, virtually everyone at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., he concludes, falls victim to "presidentitis" and abuses power. The only question left unanswered is, what's new here?
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The secrets of the presidency disclosed by Kessler (The FBI, LJ 10/15/93) have been revealed before. "White House-itis" is the arrogance that comes from being surrounded by aides eager to please and from the trappings of power unique to the presidency. The White House provides the luxury of a "132-room four-star hotel." The presidential assistants, secret agents, maids, and butlers are the ones who really know what is going on, and these are the people that Kessler interviews. Lyndon Johnson and Jimmy Carter are faulted for their meanness and contempt for their staffs; Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan are remembered for their kindness. President Clinton is skewered for his lack of character and discipline and the immaturity of his advisers. Kessler raises other important issues in this recommended expose, which will find a large audience in public libraries.
--Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, Pa.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket (April 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671879197
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671879198
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 1 x 4.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #687,761 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ronald Kessler is the New York Times bestselling author of 20 non-fiction books about the Secret Service, FBI, and CIA.

Kessler began his career as a journalist in 1964 on the Worcester Telegram, followed by three years as an investigative reporter and editorial writer with the Boston Herald. In 1968, he joined the Wall Street Journal as a reporter in the New York bureau. He became an investigative reporter with the Washington Post in 1970 and continued in that position until 1985.

Kessler's latest book is "The First Family Detail: Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of the Presidents."

Kessler has won eighteen journalism awards, including two George Polk awards--for national reporting and for community service. Kessler has also won the American Political Science Association's Public Affairs Reporting Award, the Associated Press' Sevellon Brown Memorial Award, and Washingtonian magazine's Washingtonian of the Year award. Franklin Pierce University awarded him the Marlin Fitzwater Medallion for excellence as a prolific author, journalist, and communicator. He is listed in Who's Who in America.

Ron Kessler lives with his wife Pamela Kessler in the Washington, D.C. area. Also an author and former Washington Post reporter, Pam Kessler wrote "Undercover Washington: Where Famous Spies Lived, Worked and Loved." His daughter Rachel Kessler, a public relations executive, and son Greg Kessler, an artist, live in New York.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Marvin D. Pipher on September 16, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book makes interesting reading, since it lifts the curtain slightly and gives us a peek inside the White House and Air Force One. In doing so, we're able to see some of our beloved presidents and their families as they really were when behind closed doors. A few of the resulting revelations may seem startling to some but all appear to be in line with the character of those being peeked upon.

The book is essentially a compilation of observations and information gleaned from those who worked in the White House and on Air Force One, or supported the Presidents or their families, from the beginning of Lyndon Johnson's Administration up to about the middle of the Clinton Administration. It also touches briefly on President Kennedy and includes a broad discussion of Clinton's many escapades while Governor of Arkansas. In my view, this latter discussion was most likely appended because the author was unable to acquire significant information from his sources while Clinton was still in office.

The president who came across the best in this book seemed to be Ronald Reagan. The presidents who came across the worst were Lyndon Johnson and Bill Clinton. The first lady who came across the best was Barbara Bush. The worst would probably have to be Rosalynn Carter. The best presidential child would have to be Chelsea Clinton.

The observations and excerpts which follow reveal the tenor of the book. John F. Kennedy was a known womanizer in an unhappy marriage, but the press never reported it that way, and Jacqueline Kennedy made all staff members sign a pledge not to talk about their experiences in the White House. Lyndon Johnson was not only unscrupulous, but almost as bad a womanizer as Bill Clinton.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Has a decent person ever inhabited or worked in the White House? Apparently Not. Written with the authority of a person who worked intimately with our Presidents for decades. But wait, did he ever work in the White House?? More focus on the interactions between the President and staff, senior staff and junior staff, etc., would have provided insight in the the inner workings of the White House. However, the focus was on sweeping old skeletons from the walk-in closets. I understand the intent was to show the human frailty of any person who inhabits the office - but mix in a few good stories and show some balance. I must say - it was entertaining reading. There was shock value, and some old rumors were made to sound more credible. I'd recommend giving it a read. I was looking for some more "nuts and bolts", but for anyone interested in the Presidency from a laymans view, you will probably enjoy the book. If you are looking for something more academic, read "The Twilight of the Presidency".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Robert James on August 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ronald Kessler is out to shock. And shock he does: learning that Lyndon Johnson kept three secretaries on the payroll to supply him with sexual favors in the Oval Office was a more frightening enough display of presidential arrogance than anything Bill Clinton did. But Kessler is playing sloppy historian and journalist here. One cannot keep on making accusations about every single president in the last forty years, and then not identify the source beyond "a Secret Service Agent said." While there are a number of responsible citations by name, by not revealing his sources more concretely, Kessler violates the rules of the game: always get confirmation from more than one source, and always cite your sources. It's one thing to protect your sources for a daily newspaper, when exposing the source can get him fired or hurt. It's another thing to do it in a book that wants to be taken seriously as history. That said, this is the thinking person's version of the National Enquirer. You simply have to separate out what has been attributed to a reliable source, and what has been reported as hearsay. All in all, a guilty pleasure at its most reliable, and one best used as a source for stories to tell gullible friends. Another sign of our times, where the juiciness of the tale is the top priority.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 8, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Most people will not enjoy seeing their heroes revealed as the human beings they are, full of faults and failures. Nor will they like the principle players in the Whitehouse game appearing weak and petty. Kessler raises may interesting questions, and details some disturbing behavior. Whether these stories are true or not, and they most likely are as I have not heard of any libel suit filed against Kessler for this book, is not the real point of the book. The creation of an institution that allows this sort of behavior without accountability is the real story, the more disturbing aspect of the book. Mr. Kessler should be commended for raising an issue with the secrecy that surrounds the most "visible" member of our national government.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "rjgrib" on December 16, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What is evident is the criminal behavior of the slime buckets we elect as President. Every occupant of the White House seems to out do the previous resident for wasting our money and heightening their "kingdom". Lots of good information scattered about, but Kessler must have run out of gas way before he had a complete book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again