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Insurrection: To Believe Is Human To Doubt, Divine Paperback – October 4, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Howard Books; Original edition (October 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781451609004
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451609004
  • ASIN: 1451609000
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"What does it mean when the Son of God cries out, 'My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?' Brilliantly, candidly, and faithfully, Rollins wrestles here with that question. You may not agree with his answers and conclusions, but you owe it to yourself and to the church at large to read what he says." (Phyllis Tickle, author, The Great Emergence)

"Peter Rollins is the Anti-Christ for all fake Christians." (Creston Davis, Professor, Rollins College, Department of Philosophy and Religion)

About the Author

Peter Rollins is a widely sought after writer, lecturer, storyteller, and public speaker. He is the founder of Ikon, a Belfast, Northern Ireland, faith group that has gained an international reputation for blending live music, visual imagery, soundscapes, theater, ritual, and reflection. He currently resides in Greenwich, Connecticut.

More About the Author

Peter Rollins is a provocative writer, lecturer, storyteller and public speaker who has gained an international reputation for overturning traditional notions of religion and forming "churches" that preach the Good News that we can't be satisfied, that life is difficult, and that we don't know the secret.

Challenging the idea that faith concerns questions relating to belief Peter shows that an incendiary and irreligious reading of Christianity is possible: one that destroys the distinction between sacred and secular, blurs the lines between theism and atheism and sets aside questions regarding life after death to explore the possibility of a life before death.

This approach has been christened "pyrotheology," and aims at burning up the basic assumptions that both critics and advocates of religion hold concerning the life of faith.

Peter gained his higher education from Queens University, Belfast and has earned degrees (with distinction) in Scholastic Philosophy (BA Hons), Political Theory (MA) and Post-Structural thought (PhD). He is the author of numerous books, including Insurrection: To Believe is Human; to Doubt, Divine and The Idolatry of God: Breaking our Addiction to Certainty and Satisfaction. He was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, currently lives in New York and will die.

Customer Reviews

Peter Rollins is an amazing thinker and writer.
steven m. walker
I will be right up front by mentioning that while I liked a lot of what Rollins has to say, a few things bothered me about this book.
Matte
It can give us a reason to live boldly into this life and create our destiny with God in Love.
Nate Bostian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

99 of 108 people found the following review helpful By Nate Bostian on October 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an off-the-top-of-my-head review of Peter Rollins newest book "Insurrection", which I read this weekend. The book was incredibly good, in that I deeply enjoyed reading it, and it gave me a great deal to ponder and wrestle with. At the end of the day, I value Rollins' ideas about how to existentially live out our faith in Christ on a daily basis. However, I have serious concerns over Rollins' re-visioning and re-definition of key elements of the Christian tradition. As such, Rollins is a sort of "frenemy" who, on one hand is a very helpful friend in elucidating certain aspects of what it means to follow Jesus in our culture. On the other hand, he is an enemy of certain historic Christian affirmations about God and Christ.

As a "frenemy" of Christ, Rollins maintains a place for God, at the cost of flattening God into just a Name for the structure of human psychological experience. As such, his thought is helpful as a bridge to Christ, in the same way that pantheism, panentheism, psychoanalysis and even Marxism can be bridges to Christ, all of which offer various points of commonality and intersection with Christ while also displaying broad areas of discordance. Here are some of the theological moves that Rollins makes in the book:

His key theological code-words are God, Truth, Incarnation, Crucifixion, and Resurrection. He does not seem to mind if these ideas are given "historic" content as things that happened in space time and which are cognitively affirmed as such. But for Rollins this affirmation is irrelevant, usually distracting, and simply meaningless for the postmodern person. Rather, their true meaning and relevance comes from their identity as descriptions of human experience.
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51 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Kory on October 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
Insurrection is a work that seems to make a great deal of effort in joining great theological minds such as Bonhoeffer and Augustine, and touts an impressive on-cover review by an author I consider to be a brilliant modern leader of the Church. But where other notable theologians have been powerful, controversial, and inspiring, Rollins seems to miss, being overly vague instead of poignant, presumptuous instead of observant, and passionate instead of scriptural.

The entire book revolves around his theology of the cross, particularly the moment that Jesus cries out "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" He adds that "The cross is the moment when we join with Christ in crying out 'Why have you forsaken me?' " I would reply that the cross is the moment that Christ endured a suffering on our behalf, as a ransom for many (Mark 10:46). Then there is Rollin's most controversial concept: Jesus' cry of abandonment is "a profoundly personal, painful, and existential atheism. (ch.2)" Are we to presume then, as Jesus is dropping hints in the temple cleansing (Jn. 2:19), intentionally dismissing Judas to sell him out (Jn. 13:27), and sweating blood while praying (Lk. 22:44), that he was unaware of the implications of the death (or in his words, glorification - Jn. 17) that he was about to undergo? Was he unaware of its spiritual, eternal, salvational significance? I know it seems remarkably tolerant and new-agey to identify a moment of disbelief of God in His own son, but truth and shock-value are not always the same. Not even in the Bible.

This book is not without some meritorious assertions, and I appreciate anyone who will admit that the church cannot make their "personal Jesus" into a security blanket from their doubts. In ch.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Brian Smith VINE VOICE on January 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
I read a lot of books on theology. I generally only review the ones I like. For example, I read (most of) The End of Religion: Encountering the Subversive Spirituality of Jesus and found it not nearly subversive enough- along with a few other books I haven't even bothered to finish. Rob Bell's Love Wins (reviewed here) was supposed to be so controversial (snore). So, when I got Peter Rollins' book with a quote from Rob Bell on the cover as to how it was supposed to push me off the edge of a cliff I wasn't exactly shaking in my boots. This, though is probably one of the three most dangerous books I have ever read, ranking right up there with Pagan Christianity and How to Quit Church Without Quitting God. Right there in the introduction Peter introduces us to the idea of pyro-theology, burning away the rot to reveal that which cannot be destroyed. Peter immediately sets the place on fire by saying that having faith in the god of religion is not a divine characteristic but a human one. We all naturally desire someone to love us unconditionally, someone to watch over us and make sure that everything is all right and that we make ourselves believe in this god. This claim may sound familiar- as atheists have been saying it for decades. What is surprising is hearing this come from a Christian author- in his opening chapter. The first thing he challenges us to do is to unplug from this God of religion and open ourselves up to doubt and unknowing. The central theme of the first part of the book is that the crucifixion is a (the?) defining moment in the life of Jesus. Taking part in Jesus' crucifixion is not the abandoning of everything for religion or for God. Taking part in the crucifixion is the abandoning of everything, including God and the certainty and comfort that provides us.Read more ›
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