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Integrated Physics and Calculus, Volume 1 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0201473964
ISBN-10: 0201473968
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Andrew Rex received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Virginia in 1982 after receiving an B.A. in Physics from Illinois Wesleyan University. At Virginia his research focused on experimental solid state physics. Since 1982 he has been a faculty member at the University of Puget Sound, and he currently holds the rank of Professor. His principal research interests have been in Mossbauer spectroscopy, the physics of sports, and Maxwell's demon and information theory. At the University of Puget Sound he has served as Director of the Pre-Engineering Program, Director of the university's Honors Program and Chair of the Physics Department.

Dr. Rex has published five books including Integrated Physics and Calculus, Vols. 1 and 2, Addison-Wesley 1999, and has written a number of scientific articles and papers. He is a member of the American Association of Physics Teachers, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi and Sigma Pi Sigma.

In 1994 he received a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education to develop a program that integrates freshman physics and calculus into a single course and to write a textbook for that course.


Dr. Martin Jackson received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Oregon in 1990 after receiving a M.S. degree in Physics there in 1985 and a B.S. in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Puget Sound in 1984. He was named an Assistant Professor at the University of Puget Sound in 1990 in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and Associate Professor in 1996.

He has published scientific articles in the Journal of Differential Geometry, the American Journal of Physics, the Journal of Physics, the Journal of Mathematical Physics, and other publications.

In 1994 he and Dr. Andrew Rex received a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education to develop a program that integrates freshman physics and calculus into a single course and to write a textbook for that course.


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 1st edition (November 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201473968
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201473964
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,690,670 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Back in the day, Newton pegged classical physics and calculus at the same time. Why? The two fields are intimately related- calculus is the language of physics, physics is the concrete embodiment of calculus. For some reason, this was lost in university pedogogy. You take a year of calculus to learn how to do derivatives and integrations in the abstract, then take physics to learn the applications of calculus. It's analogous to learning a computer language for a year, but not actually working on a computer until the following year. Hmmm. So (after I've already graduated) someone decides to put the two back together. Like peanut butter and jelly. The books (both volumes) are brilliant, one of the best textbooks I've seen. I'm reviewing the subjects (it's been a few years and I'm rusty), and these lend themselves so well to self-study. The style is very clear, and teaching the subjects integrated super-enforces the concepts. Some chapters are purely physics, some purely calc, but most are a little of both. The contents delves deeply into both subjects to give a solid first-year understanding of both and prepares the student for further study. The integrated approach also dispels the intimidation that occurs when studying/ reading physics and encountering lotsa math. All in all, a GREAT resource and method, and I hope this integrated method will catch on.
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It was always my philosophy that a student should complete the
first two semesters of calculus before beginning physics at the
calculus level. I felt it was too much to ask that a student have
to tackle beginning calculus and physics at the same time. There is nothing as helpful to learning physical science as a good foundation in mathematics. I took this as irrefutable and never
thought I would change my mind. Today I received both volumes of
this set. I have been looking at these books for about twelve hours and I can't believe how well the authors have seamlessly woven together calculus theory with physics theory at the first year level. If you are a student taking physics and calculus you must have these books. There isn't enough space here to do
justice to these books. If you are a real math or physics major
it will only take you 15 minutes to realize what you are looking
at. If you had AP Calculus and AP Physics you will be in for a
treat. These books are a great academic and teaching achievement and should be required reading for all calculus and physics teachers as well.
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This book is 1 of 2 which make a set. These two books are good as they are presented in black and white with a systematic layout. This is a great step away from normal university textbooks which are rehashed constantly, due to the commercialism which permeates our society, making them convoluted at times and full of irrelevant text and colorful images etc. Most of these textbooks shouldn't be allowed in our classrooms. This book didn't get five stars as some concepts and examples don't have relevant graphs and models presented which would make learning easier (especially the formulation of the surface integral). All in all this is the best calculus/physics book I've found so far. It is important to download the errata as some mistakes are present within: ...
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I found the subject matter elucidating. Refreshingly complete, the books properly integrate physics and calculus the way they were meant to be. Neither field stands alone; they enjoy a wonderful symbiotic relationship. Thanks to authors Jackson and Rex, this relationship is defined in real world terms. Highly recommended for all college level students and especially helpful for the math/physics majors.
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The authors of this book have skillfully combined insightful explanations with equally wonderfully examples. This book is excellent for those with little mathematical background interested in exploring the world of physics. The authors keep the reader entertained by maintaining a conversional tone, and a light-hearted spirit. Their love for the material radiates from each and every page.
This should be a required text for every college physics class. All to often are there students with missing pieces floating around in their heads. Other physics text books will tend to skip over the mathematical background to the topics, as not to repeat material for some students, or scare away others. This book not only excites an interest in the physical world around us, but the mathematical language of nature as well.
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