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3
votes
Hi Edgardo. The i7 3770K is a desktop processor that uses the LGA 1155 socket. As such, it will not fit in your laptop, but you could look for a hotter processor that will fit the socket P that is in your laptop. My research says the fastest processor you could be is the Core2Duo Mobile P9700.
Feb 21, 2014 by Jeffrey Mazzoni
1
vote
I'd need to know the exact model number of the chip to be certain (ie i5-####), but I think it should be the same chipset (LGA1155). Also btw, an i5 has to have at least 2 physical cores running HyperThreading (2x2=4 threads), or 4 cores with no H. T.(4x1=4 threads). In other words, there is no such thing as a single core i5 processor.
Feb 6, 2014 by ZachL
0
votes
No it is not compatible. The 4790K is compatible with Z97 boards and is a socket 1150. Your board has a socket 1155. The socket on the Motherboard has to match the socket of the CPU. This particular CPU is only compatible with a Z97 chipset. Sorry to disappoint you, but that's the way it works.
Jul 21, 2014 by Steve Williams
0
votes
It does... depending on whats wrong with it. If it was dean on arival. Then return t9 amazon saying DOA. Otherwise go threw intel and like I said 8t depends on whats wrong if its covered.
Aug 4, 2014 by Emiko12845
0
votes
You won't find a laptop with this processor. They make special i7 processors for laptops. You will want a laptop with one of these processors from the previous generation (3rd) http://ark.intel.com/products/family/65506/3rd-Generation-Intel-Core-i7-Processors#@Mobile or one of these from the present generation. (4th) http://ark.intel.com/products/family/75023/4th-Generation-Intel-Core-i7-Processors#@Mobile Best luck
Nov 22, 2014 by Neutron Man
0
votes
I would do some research to make sure. Intel develops their CPU's and chipsets in what is called a Tick -Tock cycle. They introduce a new CPU architecture, one that usually requires a new 'form factor' - a certain CPU slot type (e.g. 775, 1155, 1156, 2011, etc.). Then they refine the CPU architecture (the 'tock' cycle), which usually means they manufacture a new line of CPU's that have the same form factor, but have a smaller transistor size (and usually a few new technologies and/or enhancements, like faster HD graphics, new instruction sets, etc.). Here is a list of processors in the same family as your current one: http://ark.intel.com/products/codename/29902/Ivy-Bridge For any CPU - motherboard compatibility, there are 3 questions to be answered: 1) Is the form factor (slot) the same? 2) Does the motherboard support the new 'tock' enhancements (this often requires a BIOS update). 3) Can the computer handle the new CPU? (This is usually a question for laptops and power requirements and is of lesser concern for Desktops, though the operating system has to be able to work with the new CPU - but Windows 7, 8 and Server 2007 or 2012 should handle any current Intel CPU offering). So the main question you have to find out is if your motherboard supports the CPU you are considering as a replacement. Actually, I just looked at the Intel CPU chart for your processor and the i7-3770K, and they have the same architecture. In fact, they have all the same specs, except that the i7-3770K has faster speed and built in graphics as well as hyper threading, and the i5-3330 has an I/O virtualization feature that the i7 does not. I doubt you will miss the second feature of your current processor, but it is worth researching. They are both Ivy Bridge processors, so if the i5-3330 works in your system, the i7-3770K will work. The i7-3770K is a great processor. You also might consider the i5-3750K if you are on a budget. It is a 4 core processor with all the same features and speed as the i7 except for hyper threading, and it costs around $100 less. Some programs will benefit from hyper threading, though a good many do not. Again, research. Start with the question: 'What do you mainly use your computer for?' and go from there (i.e. if you do a lot of video editing, see if your editing program benefits from hyper threading; if not, maybe the less expensive -5-3750K will suit you just fine)..
Dec 3, 2013 by George Piazza
0
votes
For Gaming no, it would not really help. Games don't use 4 cores and really wouldn't make much difference, if any at all. For CPU heavy tasking such a video encoding and such, yes it would help. But, I seriously doubt you could tell the difference in gaming.
May 31, 2014 by Steve Williams
0
votes
Well short answer is maybe. Dell is a brand of computer. Just to makes things simple, not intending to be patronizing but can a car part lets say part Z1 fit into a Ford vehicle? Parts for a Ford Truck may not fit into a Ford Focus (compact car) or Ford Taurus (midsize car) and such. There are a lot of Ford vehicles obviously and the model makes a big difference just as it does with computers. The model of your computer can be looked up on Dell's website with the service tag or model information at dell.com. From there you will see specifications sheet and look under "compatible" processors and see if this is on the list. In addition Dell has good support and you can always call them up as well I believe which probably will be your best bet if you are novice at PC and parts. Hope this helps if someone else hasn't already.
Aug 25, 2013 by John Powers
0
votes
I use it in a desktop that I built. It has great performance with Windows 7 64 Bit. If you find one of these chips in a laptop that is great. I also have 16 Gig of DIMM though.
Sep 21, 2013 by Grog
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