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Intellectual Capital: The Proven Way to Establish Your Company's Real Value by Measuring Its Hidden Brainpower Paperback – Import, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: PIATKUS BOOKS; New Ed edition (1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749918500
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749918507
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,411,218 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 10, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This should have been an article. It is good to learn what Skandia has done to supplement its financial statements, but the book is repetitious and replete with slogans, platitudes and exhortations. Prospective readers would be better served by Relevance Lost (Johnson, Kaplan), Cost & Effect (Kaplan, Cooper) and The Loyalty Effect (Reichheld).
Edvinnson/Malone start with the obvious fact that a firm's balance sheet equity, usually, is far less than its market value. From that, they suggest that investors and managers need better information about IC to make wiser investment/operating decisions. But they do not follow through on this useful line of thinking. I would like to have learned how Skandia selected its metrics, whether it believes it has made better operating decisions because of them, and whether the metrics help to predict Skandia's cash flows or its market value. It also would have been interesting to learn how the metrics relate to the creation, use ! and consumption of IC in the specific things a firm does to turn inputs into revenue.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Turgay BUGDACIGIL on August 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Intellectual capital is a truly critical topic for twenty-first century business. As known, the subject of intellectual capital appeared on the business world in the 1990s. Patrick H.Sullivan writes, in his 'Value-Driven Intellectual Capital,' "this history actually began in the early 1980s, as managers, academics, and consultants around the world began to notice that a firm's intangible assets, its intellectual capital, were often a major determinant of the corporation's profits...By the mid 1990s it was becoming clear that there were two separate but related paths of thinking about intellectual capital. One path, the knowledge and brain power path, focused on creating and expanding the firm's knowledge. The other path, the resource-based perspective, was concerned with how to create profits from a firm's unique combinations of intellectual and tangible resources."
In this context, by proposing a new intellectual capital measurement and reporting system, Leif Edvinsson and Michael S.Malone elaborate the Skandia Model. According to this model, Skandia divides market value into financial capital and intellectual capital. Intellectual capital is further divided into:
1. 'Human Capital.' The combined knowledge, skill, innovativeness, and ability of the company's individual employees to meet the task at hand. It also includes the company's values, culture, and philosophy. It cannot be owned by the company.
2. 'Structural Capital.' Brands, trademarks, written procedures for processes, and everything else of organizational capability that supports those employees' productivity-in a word, everything left at the office when the employees go home.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Greg T. Smith on August 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Edvinsson and Malone do an excellent job with a complex and relatively esoteric topic. The authors have created an enviable work and set up the foundation for companies and managers to act accordingly.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 27, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent books that explains how to fill the gap between the book value of corporations and their market value. This gap, represents the bulk of a company's real assets which consists of organizational knowledge, customer satisfaction, product innovation, employee morale, patents, and trademarks. However these so-called "intangible assets" never appear in financial statements. That explains why they are often overlooked and undermanaged.
In a straight forward language and concepts, Leif Edvinsson tackles the real source of wealth creation in today's learning corporations. He defines what is really meant by "Intellectual Capital", how it is classified, how it is measured, and how it can be used to create wealth to stockholders.
In today's rapid changing and turbulent technological environment, this book is an essential reading for those managing any kind of organizations today. Many CEOs are finding the hard way, that Intellectual Capital is transforming the nature of doing business by establishing the real value of enterprises for those who manage them, work in them, and invest in them The result is a whole new way in performing in an emerging information economy where brick and mortar corporations certainly are out of place.
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