Interiors PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(99) IMDb 7.5/10
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This is Woody Allen's homage to Ingmar Bergman. E.G. Marshall and Geraldine Page portray the parents of three sisters: Diane Keaton, Kristin Griffith and Mary Beth Hurt. Marshall is wealthy; Page is mentally disturbed. When Marshall announces that he is leaving Page, she starts to totally disintegrate. Marshall plans to marry Maureen Stapleton. The three daughters rush to their mother's side to see her through her crisis. But the daughters have trials of their own: Keaton has great talent but is destructively unfocused; and Griffith is an overly self-centered television actress. How this family works out its difficulties is the focus of this stylish, brilliantly acted and impressively told story.

Starring:
Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt
Runtime:
1 hour, 32 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Woody Allen
Starring Kristin Griffith, Mary Beth Hurt
Supporting actors Richard Jordan, Diane Keaton, E.G. Marshall, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton, Sam Waterston, Missy Hope, Kerry Duffy, Nancy Collins, Penny Gaston, Roger Morden, Henderson Forsythe
Studio MGM
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Woody Allen certainly has his own distinct voice, and he has directed some of the best films of all time.
Andrew Ellington
The angst so present in our society's family relationships is gently observed and explored and the results are a paean of understated simplicity and pain.
Grady Harp
As he says, he has been a good husband, yes, and a good father, yes, and now he needs to get away, to have some time to himself.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 27, 2003
Format: DVD
Revisiting INTERIORS written and directed by Woody Allen in 1978 it becomes apparent that this is one of the most important American films made. In this time of video art and digital manipulation of images, both in real time and in fixed entities, INTERIORS exemplifies the finest in what film can achieve. Without manipulation of scenery, without (gratefully) a senses-asaulting musical score, without GIMMICKRY - here is a film of brilliant writing, stunningly and beautifully subtle sets and costumes, and acting of the first degree. The angst so present in our society's family relationships is gently observed and explored and the results are a paean of understated simplicity and pain. It is difficult to single out any of the outstanding cast as 'best' and that is yet another proof of ensemble acting and directing at a zenith. Yes, it is unimaginable to leave behind the characters created by Geraldine Page, H.G. Marshall, Diane Keaton, and Maureen Stapleton, but again this is an indicator of how well and cohesive the experience provided by this movie is.
I have never been a Woody Allen fan: I find his comedies overwrought, self-absorbed, and frustratingly tedious. Seeing INTERIORS on a DVD, in the quiet of home, has altered my respect for this man. A dazzingly brilliant, thoughtful, elegy of a film.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Tony Pallone on November 24, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
Woody Allen's wonderful sense of humor is not his greatest asset: it's his storycrafting genius, and nowhere is this more obvious than in this brilliant piece of serious drama, which is not merely an homage to Allen's filmmaker idol Ingmar Bergman, but an emotionally complex, riveting story in its own right. Interiors is an examination of a family coming apart at the seams, not as a result of some outside, malevolent force, but merely due to the intricacies of human nature.
Note that in his more serious work, Allen typically paints one character as the story's conscience and emotional center, and he usually plays this role himself; there are disappointing results when anyone else tries to do it. Not so for Marybeth Hurt in her multi-faceted portrayal of Joey, the family's frustrated emotional caretaker, unable to find her own identity. Maureen Stapleton also provides both contrast and comic relief in her role as Pearl, a character unfettered by complexity--and intellect!
One of the great, exhilirating pleasures in watching films is coming across a masterpiece like this one.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Brian Parks on October 13, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Woody Allen probably knew that Interiors would be panned by his most loyal fans, his most ardent critics (Pauline Kael), and even the always honorable motion picture industry. How he managed to ignore what might have been insurmountable difficulties for another is a feat of no small measure; how he managed to craft this dramatic gem is "an impossibility commensurate with two like snowflakes" (from Woody's Getting Even). Mary Beth Hurt shines as Joey, a passionate but ambivalent actress-photographer-copywriter, who cannot transcend her pressing responsibility as daughter to a delusional and depressed woman, Eve (Geraldine Page). She has two sisters (a theme to be further explored in Allen's later Hannah and her Sisters), one of whom is fairly irrelevant and indifferent to her life (the only underdeveloped character in the film), the TV actress Flynn. The other sister Renata (Diane Keaton) is a highly successful poet who has distanced herself from Joey while she deals with complex emotional issues stemming from an abusive, alcoholic husband (Richard Jordan) and her own artistic "paralysis." Woody weaves the stories together with dignity and grace, and Gordon Willis' superlative cinematography pays homage to Bergman's Sven Nyqvist (the beachwalking scene could be Persona in color) while infusing his own creative vision into each shot. Woody's comic flair is nonpareil, and his unique cinematic concept is timeless and powerful. With Interiors, Woody indelibly makes his mark as one of the finest dramatists of the 20th century as well.
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Format: DVD
It's pretty obvious that Woody Allen was so resistant in being confined as a comedy filmmaker that in the throes of his success with the wondrous "Annie Hall", he felt a need to make an über-serious drama in the Ingmar Bergman mode. This 1978 Chekhovian family drama is the result, and it is alternately affecting and exasperating. The key problem is that Allen presents such a hermetically sealed world of intellectuals and artistic souls that the interactions among the characters feel pointed and self-conscious. He has obviously since learned that his best films ("Manhattan", "Hannah and Her Sisters") are served most by his particular balance between comedy and drama.

The story concerns an upscale New York family reacting to the news that patriarch Arthur wants to leave his psychologically unstable wife Eve just released from a sanitarium. They have three daughters, all of whom are grappling with their own problems. Eldest sister Renata is a successful poet stuck in a volatile marriage to Frederick, a fellow writer whose lack of commercial success has merely heightened his jealousy and paranoia. Middle daughter Joey is Arthur's favorite, but she is unable to figure out what to do with her life, and her constant flailing frustrates everyone around her in spite of the patience of her boyfriend Michael. Youngest daughter Flyn is the beautiful, emotionally isolated one who moved to Hollywood to become a semi-successful actress.

They all respond to their mother Eve's neediness in different ways, and the inevitable turning point comes when Arthur finalizes the divorce and remarries, this time to a passionate, fun-loving widow named Pearl.
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