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Intern Hardcover – June, 1965


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (June 1965)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060804912
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060804916
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #192,383 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
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See all 20 customer reviews
If you want to KNOW how it feels read this book!
breabre@sc.llu.edu
Vivid Detail and Compelling human drama make this journal a fascinating read.
TwilightMountainTrader
It's one of those books that you want to keep and read again someday.
Nadine

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By kohoutekdriver8 on March 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I first stumbled upon this book over 20 years ago at the library, and upon finding it used some years later, snapped it up. I've nearly memorized it and I never fail to find something I missed last time I read it.

Until I learned the actual identity of the doctor (Dr. Alan Nourse, renowned juvenile sci-fi writer and longtime health columnist for Good Housekeeping), I wondered if he ever wrote anything else and was thrilled to learn he had. Upon doing so, I raided the magazine archives at my local library and yes, this book was a huge best-seller (although long out of print, it isn't hard to find) and got a lot of press when it was released.

Dr. Nourse died way too soon, in 1992 at age 64.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Alma Davis on January 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Great book, tells it as it was. I knew the author; was
our family physician for several years.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By breabre@sc.llu.edu on January 16, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book is excellent even though it is slightly outdated. The struggle with medical internship is not much different now than it was then. If you want to KNOW how it feels read this book!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By William Bryan on January 23, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I first read this look at the actual practice of medicine almost 40
years ago. A few weeks ago I re-read Intern. With only a few minor
changes, this book describes what can happen today!

Today's practice of medicine has so many wonderful new tools; but,
the tools are only as good as the craftsmen wielding them.

Reading this book, I thought it might have been written by a young Robin Cooke or Michael Crichton. In Crichton's book, 'Travels', Crichton
describes some of the secret horrors in the practice of medicine that
caused him to quit the practice of medicine after he got his degree
from Harvard.

I think that Crichton might have had a better experience if he'd taken
training at what is now Hebert School of Military Medicine; but, Hebert
did not open til 1972. I think Crichton would have made a great internist.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Larry Benjamin on June 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover
It is fascinating to compare the record of hospital care fifty years ago with modern conditions. The physicians in this book spend hours with patients, performing tasks that nowadays would be done only by nurses in an intensive-care unit. House calls, unheard of today, were routine. Women spent days in hospital after giving birth, while today, a healthy mother and child might find themselves discharged a few hours after the baby is born. What has not changed is the feeling that there is more work to be done than time to do it in, the same now as it was then.

The book takes the form of a tape-recorded journal, supposedly edited for clarity. One wishes for less casual speech, such as "oh, I almost forgot" and "maybe I'll find out about that later." It's hard to believe that a skilled writer like Nourse (the author is well-known writer Alan E. Nourse) left these in unintentionally; more likely, he deliberately inserted them to make the book more "journal-like."

The book is a thoroughly enjoyable record of an intern's experiences in an American hospital at the midpoint of the last century.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl L. on November 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I found this book on a bookshelf in the house I inherited from my grandparents, and couldn't imagine I would get so into the story. I was simply fascinated all the way through and couldn't stop turning the pages to find out what happened to this patient or that one. I never thought reading about a particular field could be so interesting, however I do love medical shows and books like ER, etc. so maybe thats why. I wish there were more books similar to this one, I really hated for it to end!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Airelon on June 28, 2007
Format: Unknown Binding
An interesting juxapostion.

I have never before read things that absolutely shocked me, in regards to the medical community. Sticking together, mistakes that are made, etc . . .

And I have never read such things; coming away with complete **empathy** towards the medical community - for the impossible task they have undertaken in assisting others. A fantastic read. Before anyone becomes overly critical of the medical community, I would suggest reading this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By CucFan on April 17, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've loved this book since high school, and recently bought this newer copy here. Set in the 1950s, this book brings us into the life of a brand new doctor during his internship year. Lavishly detailed, the book is autobiographical (with changed names), and we experience it all along with him: the ups, the downs, the fear, the confidence, and the full range of medical experience through the eyes of a beginner.

In later years it has been revealed that the "Anonymous" book was written by Dr. Alan Edward Nourse, who left medicine after a short career to become a writer of science-fiction and non-fiction medical books. He is the author of the Ladies Home Journal Medical Guide, "The Body" (Time/Life Series) and for years was also "The Family Doctor" for a monthly Good Housekeeping column
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