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  • Internal Affairs
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Internal Affairs

80 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 19, 1999
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$81.71 $18.99

1. Intro
2. Behind Closed Doors
3. Queens
4. Rape
5. Simon Says
6. Official
7. Hell
8. No Mercy
9. Right Here
10. The Next Shit
11. The Ass
12. The Light
13. God Send
14. The Truth
15. Simon Says Remix

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 19, 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rawkus Records/Priority
  • ASIN: B00001XDOH
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,877 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Patrick G. Varine on January 24, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Talk about going for the throat.
Pharoahe Monch doesn't mess around when it comes to his music. He wants it loud, right in your face, and his lyrics are the same way. As half of Organized Konfusion, he has consistently held it down as a lyrical heavyweight, constructing complex rhymes that deal with multiple ideas at once. All in all, it makes for one BANGIN' album. When those horns start layin' that nasty loop for "Simon Says," you KNOW it's on.
This is a consistently good, high-energy album that in my opinion is DEFinitely in contention for tightest release of the year. Pharoahe handles the bulk of the production (admirably, might I add), and the rest he delegates to some of New York's nicer hardcore beatmakers, the likes of Diamond D and others.
Honestly, there isn't a song on this album that can be pegged as bad. From the rollicking "Intro" to the ominous/paranoid "Behind Closed Doors" to the smooth guitar licks of "The Light," it's just one jewel after another.
And while some of the highlight tracks are collabos (Common and Talib Kweli lend a hand to the string-laden "The Light," M.O.P. stomps holes in the heavy "No Mercy," even Busta Rhymes guests on the Spanish-inflected "The Next Sh*t"), the real meat of this album comes when Pharoahe rolls solo. "Queens" is a round-the-way paean to his hometown that bumps like a champ, and even tracks with no concept behind them are still made likable by the banging production and Monch's clever wordplay.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Masir on December 28, 1999
Format: Audio CD
If Mos Def's superb solo debut wasn't enough to let you know that losing a partner doesn't mean losing musical focus then let Pharoahe Monch tell you. Actually, both solo albums surpass their groups' last efforts. But Pharoahe's triumph is more of a comeback than anything. See, Pharoahe has tasted critical glory despite being commercially ignored. Organized Konfusion's first record, O.K. and especailly the follow up, Stress: The Extinction Agenda are considered underground classics. And in case you didn't know, the headline of this review comes courtesy of a line from the Stress track "Thirteen". "Thirteen" is one of many tracks that preceeded the intellectual edge found on many parts of Internal Affairs. Long time Organized heads will reminisce of Pharoahe's "Stray Bullet" after hearing concept gems like "Rape". It probably sounds redundant too speak on how dope both Simon Says and the remix are but for this review it is very relevent. See, Internal Affairs works because he has always been regarded as one of the illest, but nearly a decade in the game has also given Pharoahe an advantage on knowing the game of the beast, or industry, as rhyme mortals would say. This time around Pharoahe doesn't just make a dope album, he constructs one. He chooses guest that truly compliment tracks. This ideology is exemplified best on the rough, adreneline filled "No Mercy" featuring the always rugged, raw stylings of M.O.P. Common and the always hungry Talib Kweli also make worthy contributions to the insightful track "The Truth". He's also consistent in drawing the line between commercial, undergound, and just plain enjoyable. Internal Affairs stumbles only when Pharoahe strays too far one way.Read more ›
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Peace Daddy VINE VOICE on May 2, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Organized Konfusion is not only the group Pharoahe Monch is in, but it also describes his style. His wickedly twisted flow and lyrics might not appeal at first listen, but after repeated listens it grows on you. The head-nodding, self-produced, ever popular first single "Simon Says" is just a sampling of Pharoahe's creativeness. He produced five of his own tracks on here, another of which is "Behind Closed Doors," a raw, bangin track. On the Alchemist-produced "No Mercy," M.O.P. and Monch combine for a hyped-up energy overdose, definitely destined to satisfy the listener (and wake up the neighbors). And he ends the album with an all-star line-up on the "Simon Says" remix, featuring the likes of Red & Meth, Busta Rhymes, & more. Overall, this album is full of rawness. Maybe not a classic, but since 4.5 is not an option, I've rounded up. Either way, this album is bangin, definitely a worthy buy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ken Kennith on February 8, 2005
Format: Audio CD
It's a real shame this album is out of print now, I'm glad I picked up a copy when it first came out.

Beats are tight especially on tracks like "Queens", "No Mercy", "The Light" and "The Truth". "Simon Says" features a beat you mighta heard before, from the old Godzilla movies (I think he actually got sued for sampling it).

Lyrics are sick as ever with Pharoahe using clever story telling, punchlines and metaphors to get his point across. He tells a grim story on "Queens" of a dude who gets caught up in the streets. Even on the intro he gets ridiculous with claims like

"Every syllable of mine is an umbilical cord through time, For the sick typical niggaz who choose to pick pitiful rhymes"

I especially like the lyrics on "The Truth", my favorite beat of the album nonetheless (provided by Diamond). All three emcees, Pharoahe, Common, Kweli are on point speaking about the meaning of the truth. Pharoahe puts it like this

"Truth brings light, light refracts off the mirror

Visions of yourself and error could never clearer

The truth is that you ugly, not on the outside

But in the inside on the outside you frontin you lovely

The discovery of these things and all are well-hidden

But when you in denial of self it is forbidden, that's the truth"

I rate it 4 stars only because I feel like some of the beats have this club feel to them with wild drums and catchy sounds, but those tracks may be what gets an otherwise non-underground hiphop listener to spin this disc.

Overall, 4 stars means buy this album by any means necessary.
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