Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Used but still in excellent shape. Clean pages and little wear.Great prices and great return policy! Best books around. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

International Economics: Theory and Policy Hardcover – January 1, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0673521040 ISBN-10: 0673521044 Edition: 2nd

Used
Price: $0.01
3 New from $100.00 11 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $99.96
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, January 1, 1991
$100.00 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$57.00
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 682 pages
  • Publisher: Scott Foresman & Co; 2nd edition (January 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0673521044
  • ISBN-13: 978-0673521040
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,044,260 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Krugman earned his Ph.D. in economics from MIT, and has since taught at some of United States' most prestigious universities, including Yale, Stanford, MIT, and currently, Princeton University.

Krugman spent a year in the early 1980s working in the White House for the Council of Economic Advisors. He has written and edited several hundred articles and 18 internationally acclaimed books. Notably, he is recognized as a co-founder of the "new trade theory," which has been an important contribution to the fields of economics and finance.

In recognition of his achievements, Krugman was awarded the John Bates Clark medal in 1991.


Maurice Obstfeld specialized in mathematics in Cambridge University and went on to MIT, where he attained his Ph.D. in economics. He has since held faculty positions at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania and currently, is the class of 1958 Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.

Obstfeld has authored numerous articles and highly influential books. In view of his prominence in the fields of economics and finance, he has served as consultant for the World Bank, as participant in the European Commission Study Group on the impact of the Euro on capital markets, and most recently as the honorary advisor for the Institute of Economic and Monetary Studies, Bank of Japan.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It has clear, colorful graphs with notes right next to the graphs explaining the movements.
Enjolras
For anybody - but especially students - interested in exploring the subject of international economics, this is the book to start with.
L. Battaglini
The cover of the text book I received states "Sample Materials Not for Resale" in huge letters.
CityMic

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

111 of 138 people found the following review helpful By TitaniumDreads on April 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First off, even if you totally discount the rest of my review, buy the low price international version of this book. On the March 10, 2005 episode of the daily show Krugman elucidated his feelings quite clearly. "The real money is in textbooks. With other books, people need to decide whether to buy them or not. Students have to buy textbooks." Thanks Paul. I think I'm being charitable when I say that at $125 this book is a ripoff. It isn't even full color.

Anyway, on to the actual content of the book. I have to say that I was excited when I found out that my International economics course at Stanford was going to be using Paul Krugman's book. I've enjoyed his articles for the New York Times because they manage to cut right to the core of issues with an unusual amount of punch. Yet, time and time again I was disappointed with the frequently inpenatrable language and obtuse, unrealistic examples in this book. Unfortunately, the only part of Krugman's characteristic writing style that came through was a feeling of overwrought vitriol, which makes sense in an op-ed but has little place in a textbook. Furthermore, this book occupies a strange niche in the world of econ texts, it is not mathematically rigorous, nor is it well written. Usually we see one or the other but rarely both. Initially, I thought these observations were mine alone, but other students began openly voicing pointed criticisms of the book during class (and I am perhaps being too kind here in not repeating them). I've been in school nearly as long as I can remember and I have never seen such discontent with a text.

During the second half of the course even my econ prof became fed up and abandoned the book altogether. Given that, I find all of the positive reviews for this book rather astounding.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 67 people found the following review helpful By L. Battaglini on May 4, 1999
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For anybody - but especially students - interested in exploring the subject of international economics, this is the book to start with. It is illuminating (as it is always the case with Krugman's writings) on otherwise technical concepts as comparative advantage, trade policy and exchange rate determinants, but it is also entertaining, with its "reality checks". The first part of the book deals with the "real" economy, the second part with monetary international economics. It will save you a lot of time to begin your study of the field with this book. If you have had previous experiences with international economics but either forgot most about it or had trouble making sense of the whole thing you will probably get a good grasp of the subject after reading this manual. The bibliography is accurate and rich, the exercises won't give you an headache. Readers with some background in economics are most likely to take full advantage from the book. For the others, well, some introductory economics will be necessary. Once you've read this book, you can continue more safely your studies/readings on international economics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Coleman Nee on November 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Regarding Gerald Senarclens de Grancy's comments: The idea of Krugman as a Bush administration cheerleader is pretty funny. At first I thought this was a joke but then I realised it wasn't. Granted, the book doesn't mention the Tobin Tax, but there's only so much you can pack into a superficial survey text like this. Overall, I think the authors are pretty unbiased and mainstream. (Haven't used the web supplements, so can't comment on that).

Having seen this book evolve over several editions, I can honestly say that the current one represents a distinct improvement, with the new introductory chapter on the gravity model providing some much needed perspective at the start. However, it's not an ideal book to learn trade theory and open econonmy macro from. My favorite (although slightly more rigorous) is "The International Economy" by Kenen. And if you are only interested in trade theory, "International Trade, Theory and Evidence" by Markusen et. al. is superior.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 30 people found the following review helpful By thisismyname on June 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Well, I will start off by saying that the book really probably only deserves somewhere between 4-4.5 stars, but I'll give it 5 to offset some of the questionable reviews below.
No, the book is not perfect. However, it is an academic standard at pretty much any major college or university for teaching undergraduate International Econ/Trade theory, and for good reason. The book makes a clear a concise presentation of basic theory and policy, perhaps in points it is a little too simple. As pointed out, while I'm not sure about the 6th edition, there were some diagrammatical mistakes in the 5th...I bet, however, these were done by a graduate student. A quick bit of reasoning and a second of thought should yield the appropriate picture, however. And yes, I think a bit of Krugman's bias comes through, though its not terribly off-putting.
The book could use a bit more math I think. The real equations and difficult problems are few and far between, and are, for the most part, pretty straight forward. At the very most it would take a basic understanding of calculus, but the majority of the problems and equations can be explained and done without it. I have read a number of undergraduate economics books with far more intensive math. Despite this lack, however, the intentions come across pretty well.
No, this book is not for beginners to economics. At least an undergraduate course or reading in both micro and macro are needed, and really and truly, an intermediate level in each is probably better if one wants to get the most out of the book.
If you find the subject matter within to be terribly math intensive and you cannot get motivated to read the subject matter because it doesn't use "pizza and beer" (and um...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews