Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

International Encyclopedia of Secret Societies and Fraternal Orders Paperback – July 1, 1998


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$121.08 $1.39
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Checkmark Books (July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816038716
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816038718
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,952,531 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Axelrod (Encyclopedia of the American West, LJ 11/1/96) gives us a detailed, well-written encyclopedia of past and present social, service, ethnic, trade, mystical, religious, political, and criminal societies from around the world. Over 800 entries cover organizations and related topics such as rituals, degrees, and symbols, with those on active organizations including membership information, activities, and addresses. Axelrod also provides a useful introductory essay on the evolution of secret societies and reasons why individuals join such groups, and he closes the work with a detailed bibliography. This work duplicates some of the directory information found in the Encyclopedia of Associations (Gale, 1997. 32d ed.) but updates older titles like William Joseph Whalen's Handbook of Secret Organizations (1966. o.p.). Recommended for both academic and public libraries.?Stephen L. Hupp, Univ. of Pittsburgh at Johnstown
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"This is a well-prepared source on fraternal, secret, and similar societies . . . [it] is useful for it historical perspective, as well as for the fact that it brings such a diverse group of organizations together in a single source." -- Booklist

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Roel van Leeuwen on October 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
A poor presentation of a fascinating and interesting subject.

It is evident that Axelrod has little direct and personal knowledge of the subject matter as his turn of phrase is often `out of synch' with common usage within various fraternal orders. Arguably, membership in one or a number of fraternal organizations would be a necessary pre-requisite before embarking on a work of this nature as fraternal societies are, in most instances, a society apart and thus have their own idiosyncrasies in terminology and approach to matters. Frequently he simply `misses the point'.

While at times he does make some genuinely humourous remarks or observations, often, however, these asides often miss their mark and come across as condescending and belittling. Similarly, despite being an `International Encyclopedia' his material is concentrated mainly on American forms of fraternalism, ignoring to a large degree British and European manifestations of the same groups. This is despite his criticism in an entry about another American author on the same subject being American-centric and also elsewhere making comment that the US does do things significantly different to Europe- these flaws are particular pronounced in his entries on Freemasonry, Oddfellowship and the Orange Order (about which he seems to have done remarkably little investigation indeed). The entry on the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia is laughable in its incompleteness and erroneousness, and makes one wonder where Axelrod sourced a lot of his information because- again- a lack of actual research is evident in this entry.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 29, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Not very, as the author makes clear in this
fascinating tour of organizations from the Abecedairiens
(who were suspicious of the newfangled printing
press), to the Zuzumites (a defunct order about which
little is known).

Comprehensive treatment is given of the Freemasons,
Moose, Red Men, and other fraternal groups, and
many others such as the Ku Klux Klan, Mafia, Lions,
Rosicrucians, Knights of Columbus, and the famous E Clampus Vitus, a gold
rush relic which survives in the California Gold
Country today as a drinking and hellraising society.

Of special interest are the "secrets" of the secret societies,
such as "grips" (secret handshakes), oaths,
ceremonies and rituals, and "magic".Fascinating reading.

(The numerical rating above is a default setting
within Amazon"s format. This reviewer does not
employ numerical ratings.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
I was throughly disappointed with Dr. Axelrod's book on Fraternal orders. I am an educated man, and a member of over 25 friendly socities. Axelrod definately read Schmidt's 1980 book Fraternal Orginizations. This is illustrated via his reporting that "this groups has not been heard of since 1980." What he is actually saying is "that the group has moved headquarters since 1980(when Schmidt reported it)and I do not want to take time and research the new location." He declares several groups to be long since dead, however they are very much alive. I wish Dr. Axelrod would have looked for sources better, he could have had a better book. This information takes a little bit of hard work to find, however it is easily accessable. after reading various texts I am able to see how Axelrod merely copies their work. I would suggest buying this book, it is fairly interesting, however it is full of inaccurate info.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Louie S. on August 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Some of the information written in the book are inaccurate and lacks research.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dave Fisherman on May 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
I THINK THIS is a great encylopida about a rare subject.I think alot of pepole don't understand sercert societies.They made a mistake thought it sayes the Russian Knights are on a certain page# but therers no info on them.Its very informative thought.They should update it for '02-03'.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images