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  • International Medcom Radalert 100 Digital Radiation Monitor
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International Medcom Radalert 100 Digital Radiation Monitor

3 customer reviews

Price: $530.94 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
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Specifications for this item
Brand Name International Medcom
Part Number Radalert 100
Number of Items 1
Display LCD
Item Weight 0.5 pounds
Overall Height 1-3/16  inches
Overall Length 5-57/64  inches
Overall Width 3-3/16  inches
UNSPSC Code 26142300

The International Medcom Radalert 100 is a hand-held radiati... Read full product description



Product Features

  • Radiation detector used for surveying levels of potentially harmful ionizing particles and rays in the environment such as in naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) contamination, contamination detection of packages, and equipment, and in first responder, personal safety, educational, and ambient monitoring applications
  • Device is not energy compensated, and allows for detection of ionizing radiation types including alpha and beta particles, and gamma rays and x-rays
  • Audible alert feature sounds when radiation reaches a user-defined level
  • LCD digital light displays current radiation level in milliroentgens (mR) per hour (mR/hr), or counts per minute (CPM); or when SI (metric) units are selected, in microSieverts per hour, or counts per second (CPS)
  • Provides total count for a timed period (from one minute to 40 hours) to determine average CPM over a period of time for higher accuracy


Product Details

User Manual [233kb PDF]
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 1.2 x 3.2 inches ; 8 ounces
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Domestic Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • International Shipping: This item is not eligible for international shipping. Learn More
  • ASIN: B006C4ZSCS
  • Item model number: Radalert 100
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #128,783 in Industrial & Scientific (See Top 100 in Industrial & Scientific)
  • Manufacturer’s warranty can be requested from customer service. Click here to make a request to customer service.

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Product Description

The International Medcom Radalert 100 is a hand-held radiation detector that detects potentially harmful ionizing alpha and beta particles, and gamma and x-ray radiation, and has an alert feature, Geiger-Mueller (G-M) tube with mica end window, accumulated total timer function, and LCD digital display of milliroentgens (mR) per hour (mR/hr), counts per minute (CPM), microSieverts (μSv) per hour (μSv/hr), or counts per second (CPS). This radiation detector has the ability to detect levels of the four main types of ionizing alpha and beta particles, and gamma rays and x-rays over automatic operational ranges. It is optimized to detect small changes (low levels) in radiation levels and to have high sensitivity to many common radionuclides.

The Radalert 100 has an audible alert feature that sounds when radiation reaches a user-defined level. It features a 4-digit LCD digital display that updates every three seconds. It displays current radiation level in choice of mR/hr, or CPM; or when SI (metric) units are selected, in μSv/hr, or CPS. The detector counts ionizing radiation changes at 3-second intervals. At low background levels, which are typical in a geographic area, the count is the moving average for the most recent 30-second time period. A moving average helps smooth out short-term data fluctuations. The time period for the moving average decreases, as radiation levels increase. A red LED light flashes with each ionization event. The instrument has an accumulated total count and a timer function that provides total event count for a timed period (from one minute to 40 hours) to determine average CPM for higher accuracy. The radiation detector has an audio indicator with an internally mounted beeper that can be muted. Total timer, audio on/off and units of measurement are selected and displayed using the front-panel mode indicators. The utility menu allows modification of default settings for several operating parameters.

This radiation detector has a halogen-quenched, Geiger-Mueller (G-M) tube with a thin disk of mica on its end window for sensing ionizing radiation. The unit is used for surveying levels of potentially harmful ionizing particles and rays in the environment such as in naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) contamination, contamination detection of packages, and equipment, and in first responder, personal safety, educational, and ambient monitoring applications. It comes in a protective soft carrying case. The Radalert 100 comes with a Certificate of Conformance. The Radalert 100 cannot be returned.

Specifications

Sensor Geiger-Mueller detector (LND712) with Mica end window 1.5 to 2.0 mg/cm2 density.
Side wall 0.012” 446 stainless steel
Operation ranges 0.001 to 110 mR/hr, 0 to 350,000 CPM
0.01 to 1,100 μSv/hr, 0 to 3,500 CPS
0 to 9,999,000 total counts
Timer operation range 1 minute to 40 hours
Calibration Cesium 137 (gamma)
Sensitivity 1000 CPM/mR/hr referenced to Cesium (Cs)137, detected through the end window
Accuracy + or - 10% typical, + or -15% maximum (mR/hr and μSv/hr modes)
Alert User-defined alert level to 50 mR/hr and 160,000 CPM
Radiation level display 0.001 to 110 mR/hr, or 0 to 350,000 CPM
Radiation level display, SI (metric) units 0.01 to 1100 microSieverts (μSv) per hour, or 0 to 3,500 counts per second (CPS)
Output Stereo 3.5 mm jack for counts output to computers, data loggers, other CMOS-compatible devices, and headphones
Input Mono 2.5mm jack provides electronic calibration input
Power One 9-volt alkaline battery (not included) for approximately 2,160 hours of operation with continuous use in normal background. Minimum battery life is 625 hours at 1 mR per hour with beeper off
Dimensions 150 x 80 x 30 mm/5.9 x 3.2 x 1.2 inches (H x W x D)
Weight 225 g (8 oz.) with battery (not included)

H is height, the vertical distance from the lowest to highest point; W is width, the horizontal distance from left to right; D is depth, the horizontal distance from front to back.

Radiation detectors, sometimes called Geiger counters or G-M counters, can detect a broad range of ionizing alpha and beta particles, and gamma and x-rays that may be emitting harmful levels of radiation. Many detectors sense ionizing radiation with an enclosed Geiger-Mueller (G-M) tube to count radiation particles or rays. Alpha and beta particles are measured in counts per minute (CPM) or counts per second (CPS). Gamma rays and x-rays are measured in milliRoentgens (mR) per hour, microSieverts (μSv) per hour, or milliSieverts (mSv) per hour. Alpha particles are positively charged and heavier than beta particles, and have a limited range of approximately 3 to 5 centimeters by air. Alpha particles can be shielded by objects such as paper and unopened skin. High-energy beta particles are electrons, heavier than gamma rays, and can take either a positive or negative charge. Beta particles can be shielded by aluminum or wood. High-frequency (short wavelength) gamma rays are the strongest and lightest rays. Gamma rays are more penetrating than alpha and beta particles. They can be shielded by dense materials such as lead, and large masses of concrete, hardened steel, or water. X-rays are man-made gamma rays, and have essentially the same properties and function. Radiation detectors commonly have either an analog or a digital display. Analog radiation detectors output with a needle-point scale, and digital units generate a numerical LCD digit display. Radiation detectors are commonly used by hobbyists for safety detection and rock inspection, and professionals in the in the nuclear, medical, mining, instructional, and research industries.

International Medcom, Inc. manufactures radiation detection instruments and systems for the health and safety, environmental protection, and education industries. The company was founded in 1986, and is headquartered in Sebastopol, CA. Many International Medcom products have International Organization for Standards (ISO) or Conformite Europeene (CE) certification.

What’s in the Box?

  • Radalert 100 radiation detector
  • Soft carrying case
  • Quick start guide
  • Certificate of Conformance

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dennis the Menace on June 21, 2012
Verified Purchase
I got my Medcom Radalert 100 Radiation Monitor (Geiger Counter) earlier this month (June 2012), and I've had a chance to play with it a bit. As far as I can tell, it performs accurately (but then I'm a teacher, not a nuclear technician).

The baseline radiation in my area is reported to be 12CPM, and the Radalert 100 measures it between 10 and 12 CPM (counts per minute) every time I turn it on. I tested bananas to see if they are slightly radioactive (15+ CPM) due to the Potassium-40 content -- as I'd read somewhere -- and, yes, it's true.

I dug up an old model smoke detector, and carefully disassembled it (which, incidentally, several federal agency websites recommended NOT doing). I found the small sample of Americium-241, in a metal-lined, plastic "can", with the metal cap. After removing the lid, and using the Radalert's mica ("alpha") window at the front of the Radalert, I rested the radalert flush on the edge of the "can" (positioning it about 1.5 cm directly above the Americium),and I got a much stronger reading (120 CPM). I verified there was some Alpha radiation by placing a sheet of standard typing paper (folded into a 4-thickness sheet) between the mica window and the Americium sample. Within a minute, the reading dropped from 120 down to 90 CPM. (Paper is an effective barrier to alpha particles.) I was expecting a much higher ratio of Alpha-to-Gamma particles (than 30:90), but now I have something new to research this weekend; this opens a new hobby for me and my kids: "nuclear energy" -- and possibly survival strategies in a post-Fukushima world.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert C Holladay on January 25, 2012
Worked great for 5 months, then the screen wouldn't show anything. The manual said the tube was bad if that happens. The warranty on the unit is one year, except for the tube. the tube is only guaranteed for 3 months. I would go with a different brand, and hopefully they don't use the same tube.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Canadian Woman - BC on January 25, 2012
Verified Purchase
Thanks to Radalert I found one hot spot and also checked on certain food from Korea, Japan and China. Surprisingly, found slightly increased radioactivity in Korean dry seaweed and frozen fish packaged in China!
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