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Internet Voting Now! Here's How. Here's Why - So You Can Kiss Citizens United Goodbye! Kindle Edition

2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 312 pages

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Product Details

  • File Size: 389 KB
  • Print Length: 312 pages
  • Publisher: The Internet Voting Research and Education Fund (April 13, 2011)
  • Publication Date: April 13, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004WKQ6X4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,075,600 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Unlike some reviewers of Dr. Kelleher's book, I have actually read the entire book. If you read even the preview pages of this book, offered on Amazon for free, you can quickly realize that most of the other reviewers probably didn't read a word of this book. Their over-the-top rebukes of the book are filled with standard cut-and-paste arguments.

I will state at the outset of this book review that I am an advocate for online voting. I judged this book based on how well I feel it makes the case for online voting, and how strongly he backs up his contentions. I will leave it for all readers of this review to decide if my review is objective enough. The readers that count, however, are the average people looking for information about a very important issue, not the professional "nay-sayers".

I feel that this book can be divided into thirds for the purpose of review. The first third of the book, which I found to be the strongest section, begins to lay out the history of our voting system, and does an extremely good job of addressing concerns about the security of online voting. He also addresses head-on the existence and background of some of the professional skeptics of online voting.(Some of these people, no doubt, are those who will post "reviews" of books like this.)

The goal of any good non-fiction book should be to inform. I learned a great deal about the entire history of online voting from the beginning of this book.

I found the chapters in the book that are devoted to SERVE (An online voting system already developed)to be particularly compelling. Dr. Kelleher does a great job of shining a light on the story of an online voting system that was created and trialed a decade ago, and the people who were responsible for it's demise.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Bill Kelleher's name has been popping up all over the place, insisting that Internet Voting is perfectly safe. Computer scientists, almost unanimously, believe that the author is in way over his head and really "doesn't get it". The fact is that Internet voting is impossible to protect from hackers, foreign or domestic, and I certainly wouldn't recommend this book to anyone; why waste your time and money on this mistaken (maybe intentional, maybe accidental) author? I'd check out the real experts, such as Mark Crispin Miller, Greg Palast, David Jefferson, Barbara Simons, Brad Friedman, Bob Fitrakis, and the list goes on.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have to fundamentally disagree with Robert's review (August 17 2011). I read the book with real interest; I have done quite a bit of analysis on electronic voting and published several text on the topic, and while I knew from the very title I would not agree with William Kelleher, I did start this book with real interest.

As the title says, I feel this book as a disconnected series of somewhat related books, but failing to keep the same topic. I understand his proposal is very delimited and explicit, but the conceptual jumps (and the quality of the texts) are too great to ignore. Of course, in the course of the book it is easy to find Dr. Kelleher is a political scientist, but in the practice knows very little about computers, networking, and information security. I had some mail interchange with Dr. Kelleher, and my opinions were firmly assured by his replies.

The book is very USA-centric; those of us in other countries can learn a lot from it -- Although on somewhat lateral topics.

The first part of the book (introduction and chapter 1) starts by reviewing the state of distance voting, and exposes some problems with the current snail-mail approach. And, yes, few people would contest that absentee voters do have a suboptimal way to vote -- But when questioned about many other ways to achieve a safer, clearer way for a vote to be generated (i.e. by having proper precincts in embassies and consulates, strongly reducing the number of people that would have to truly vote from a distance), his answer was too vague: He wanted nothing to distract from his proposal.

As to my questionings on his exagerate faith in having the USA programmers and system administrators create a truly secure system (something that has never been achieved in any area!
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Format: Kindle Edition
The author utterly fails to address fundamental problems with internet voting. The key principle should be that individual voters and the public at large should be assured that the vote is actually counted as the voter intended. This is simply impossible given the current architecture of the internet.

The "little known Original Intentions of our Constitution's Framers for presidential elections" entirely ignores that at the time the Constitution was adopted, voters attended public meetings to cast their votes, allowing for debate and interaction that cannot be realistically duplicated with internet voting.

The author's technical analysis is shallow and deeply flawed.
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