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How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results For Family History & Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics Paperback – December 19, 2002


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How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results For Family History & Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics + Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree + DNA and Family History: How Genetic Testing Can Advance Your Genealogical Research
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 266 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (December 19, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595263348
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595263349
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 1.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,096,009 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Anne Hart writes books that make complex topics easy to understand for those with no science background. She holds a graduate degree and has written up to three books a year since 1963, both novels and nonfiction. She specializes in writing books about DNA, genetics, molecular anthropology, genealogy, history, and ethnology.

Customer Reviews

1.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Veronica B. Curry on June 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Just a heads-up warning: Anne Hart makes her living by writing "books that sell" not by writing on topics about which she is an expert, or even about topics with which she has sufficient experience. She lists her 30 most recent self-published books in the back of this one--and one of her titles was "Writing Books that Sell." Does this sound like a credible author to you?!
The title of this book is grossly misleading and in fact barely one page in 10 makes reference to legitimate scientific data--or even to the scientists who supposedly "speak out". Her research was poorly conducted and even more poorly analyzed. She spends several chapters on topics which have no business being including in this book--namely, "creating a scrapbook" (where one sentence out of pages of text refers to DNA), and "beginning genealogy research." In the latter, she repeatedly does those readers who haven't done any genealogy reserach, a great disservice by misdirecting them on methods of locating a woman's maiden name. She suggests ordering birth records. How, pray tell, does one order a birth record for a person whose maiden name is unknown?! Ask the county clerk for copies of every record of a child born on a given date? Please!
While I applaud the use of the Internet as a means of self-publishing, one should not use it as a shortcut around publishing in a professional manner. Within the first seven pages of text, I found a dozen errors (typographical, spelling, grammar, and punctuation), which even a blind (but not deaf) editor would catch. Ms. Hart's writing style leads one to believe she published the book as it was first written--a draft version in which no thought was given to logical chapter order (definitions and explanations of DNA and genes can be found somewhere around page 110).
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By James M. Freed on May 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results..." is a misnomer. The book does not provide the reader with any information on the topics of "short tandem repeats" (STR's) or "most recent common ancestor" (MRCA), or any significant information on mutations rates. I have not found anyplace in her book that she gives any significant information about DYS markers, or the significance thereof, on the Y chromosome. The book contains very little information on how to interpret your mitochondrial DNA results. Further, the book contains numerous sections that do not relate to interpretation of your DNA results, such as the "Human Genome Project", "How to Interview Older Adults", "Have a Personal or Family History of Cancer", and 50 pages of a dictionary of genetic terms taken from a web site. Yet the book's index is only 5 pages in length, insufficient to find significant information that may be available. Further, the book contains some serious errors, such as "HLA genes are white blood cells".
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By James M. Freed on May 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results..." is a misnomer. The book does not provide the reader with any information on the topics of "short tandem repeats" (STR's) or "most recent common ancestor" (MRCA), or any significant information on mutations rates. I have not found anyplace in her book that she gives any significant information about DYS markers, or the significance thereof, on the Y chromosome. The book contains very little information on how to interpret your mitochondrial DNA results. Further, the book contains numerous sections that do not relate to interpretation of your DNA results, such as the "Human Genome Project", "How to Interview Older Adults", "Have a Personal or Family History of Cancer", and 50 pages of a dictionary of genetic terms taken from a web site. Yet the book's index is only 5 pages in length, insufficient to find significant information that may be available. Further, the book contains some serious errors, such as "HLA genes are white blood cells".
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
Poorly written, not on topic, duplications and very little substance. A huge disappointment. The title sounded like it would be a step by step outline to interpreting your DNA. It's anything but.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James M. Freed on May 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results..." is a misnomer. The book does not provide the reader with any information on the topics of "short tandem repeats" (STR's) or "most recent common ancestor" (MRCA), or any significant information on mutations rates. I have not found anyplace in her book that she gives any significant information about DYS markers, or the significance thereof, on the Y chromosome. The book contains very little information on how to interpret your mitochondrial DNA results. Further, the book contains numerous sections that do not relate to interpretation of your DNA results, such as the "Human Genome Project", "How to Interview Older Adults", "Have a Personal or Family History of Cancer", and 50 pages of a dictionary of genetic terms taken from a web site. Yet the book's index is only 5 pages in length, insufficient to find significant information that may be available. Further, the book contains some serious errors, such as "HLA genes are white blood cells".
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