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Into The Wild [HD DVD]


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• IMPORTANT NOTICE: This high-definition disc will only play in an HD DVD player. It will not play in a standard-definition DVD player, Blu-ray player, or PS3.

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Product Details

  • Actors: Emile Hirsch, Vince Vaughn, Catherine Keener, Marcia Gay Harden, William Hurt
  • Directors: Sean Penn
  • Writers: Sean Penn, Jon Krakauer
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Color, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English, French, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Paramount Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: March 4, 2008
  • Run Time: 148 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,162 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000ZN803G
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #102,311 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Into The Wild [HD DVD]" on IMDb

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

This is the true story of Christopher McCandless (Emile Hirsch). Freshly graduated from college with a promising future ahead, McCandless instead walked out of his privileged life and into the wild in search of adventure. What happened to him on the way transformed this young wanderer into an enduring symbol for countless people -- a fearless risk-taker who wrestled with the precarious balance between man and nature.

Amazon.com

A superb cast and an even-handed treatment of a true story buoy Into the Wild, Sean Penn's screen adaptation of Jon Krakauer's bestselling book. Emile Hirsch stars as Christopher McCandless, scion of a prosperous but troubled family who, after graduating from Atlanta's Emory University in the early 1990s, decides to chuck it all and become a self-styled "aesthetic voyager" in search of "ultimate freedom." He certainly doesn't do it halfway: after donating his substantial savings account to charity and literally torching the rest of his cash, McCandless changes his name (to "Alexander Supertramp"), abandons his family (William Hurt and Marcia Gay Harden as his bickering, clueless parents and Jena Malone as his baffled but loving sister, who relates much of the backstory in voice-over), and hits the road, bound for the Alaskan bush and determined not to be found. For the next two years he lives the life of a vagabond, working a few odd jobs, kayaking through the Grand Canyon into Mexico, landing on L.A.'s Skid Row, and turning his back on everyone who tried to befriends him (including Catherine Keener and Brian Dierker as two kindly, middle-aged hippies and Hal Holbrook in a deeply affecting performance as an old widower who tries to take "Alex" under his wing). Penn, who directed and wrote the screenplay, alternates these interludes with scenes depicting McCandless' Alaskan idyll--which soon turns out be not so idyllic after all. Settling into an abandoned school bus, he manages to sustain himself for a while, shooting small game (and one very large moose), reading, and recording his existential musings on paper. But when the harsh realities of life in the wilderness set in, our boy finds himself well out of his depth, not just ill-prepared for the rigors of day to day survival but realizing the importance of the very thing he wanted to escape--namely, human relationships. It'd be easy to either idealize McCandless as a genuinely free spirit, unencumbered by the societal strictures that tie the rest of us down, or else dismiss him as a hopelessly callow naïf, a fool whose disdain for practical realities ultimately doomed him. Into the Wild does neither, for the most part telling the tale with an admirable lack of cheap sentiment and leaving us to decide for ourselves. --Sam Graham

Customer Reviews

Great film, excellent scenery, very good acting.
Dear Miss Mermaid
I found the story captivating, living his life free from what most of us feel is a typical existence.
T
I really did not want to see the movie come to an end.... it was that good.
Gary R.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When I read Jon Krakauer's "Into the Wild" approximately ten years ago, I was mesmerized by the tragic real-life tale of Christopher McCandless. But as much as I loved the book, I never even thought about a film adaptation. Maybe that was shortsighted of me. Recounting McCandless's life and reconstructing it with minimal data and much introspection, "Into the Wild" succeeded as a cautionary adventure of idealism gone awry. Much of McCandless's life was lived alone and much of his story was pieced together though brief encounters or recovered writings. So what was a thoughtful portrait on the page never really seemed like it would translate to the screen--certainly not with the same impact. Luckily, though, Sean Penn thought otherwise. Adapting and directing Krakauer's fine book, Penn has fashioned a sad, funny and exciting film with tremendous emotional resonance.

An affluent and likable young man, McCandless graduated with honors from Emory University and then set a course to redefine his life. Abandoning his family, friends, and material possessions--McCandless assumed the pseudonym of Alexander Supertramp and set off to explore the world in its most innocent form. Living off the land and experiencing nature, fellow travelers, and much adventure--McCandless was looking for a modern day utopia and sought to discover his real self as he cast away the corruptions of modern life. Touring the country for two years, McCandless's exploration was to culminate in an Alaskan sojourn--where he would commune with "the wild." His aspirations can be viewed as both admirable and delusional--but that is part of the complexity of McCandless's life. As much as you want him to succeed, you realize there can be no happy ending with the expectations he has in place.
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79 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Kendra on April 28, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Into the Wild is one of those movies whose images stay with you after the screen goes dark. This is a tribute to the subject-- a tragic and confused young pseudo idealist, Christopher McCandless-- and Sean Penn and his crew.

McCandless has just graduated from Emory University. He's bright, well-liked, talented, the world is his for the taking-- it seems. Then he chucks it all, burns his money, abandons his vehicle, donates his graduate school fund to charity and hits the road. He's a leatherfoot, hoofing all across the country from Atlanta to South Dakota, on to California and finally to his goal of the utopian loner's dream world of "Alaska". Alaska is quoted here because it represents far more for McCandless than just a remote place full of emptiness and nature. It represents the "wild" - that gorgeous and challenging place where he can find himself, or so he thinks.

He's on a wild goose chase with himself but doesn't quite understand or realize it. He thinks he's stuffing life and experience and learning into all the time that he has-- he's abandoned everything including his sister and parents. In fact, he refuses to communicate with them at all. Their heartbreak, worry, fears, and frustrations are with us the viewer at all times and we wonder (as do a few characters in the film) silently, "how can he do this to them"?

Chris hits the road hard. He takes odd jobs, and goes from frustrated relationship to the next one. But they always are frustrating because he simply will not give of himself. They aren't frustrating for him, but for those who want to befriend him. His search for personal meaning is truly little more than an avoidance of his own personal demons, mostly from his parents' history and rocky marriage.
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129 of 154 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 9, 2008
Format: DVD
Christopher McCandless, in becoming 'Alexander Supertramp', holds a mirror to us all, a meditation on what the ideal life completely in tune with nature, surviving only on ingenuity and adaptation skills, leaving the increasingly burdensome conflicts of society behind in order to become at one with the universe. Based on Jon Krakauer's reconstruction of McCandless' journey from his diary, from letters, and from notes found after his death at age 23, IN THE WILD has been transformed into a Waldenesque film by Sean Penn who provided both the screenplay and the direction. While some may argue the very loose technique of relating this story, few will come away form this film untouched by the sheer dreamy valor of a youth determined to find his own connection to the meaning of existence.

The bright McCandless (Emile Hirsch) graduates from Emory University and faces a celebratory dinner with his wealthy but dysfunctional parents (William Hurt and Marcia Gay Harden) and his adoring younger sister Carine (Jena Malone). During the stilted and revealing dinner Christopher declines his parents' gift of a new car and instructions on how to proceed with his life of success, instead electing to leave it all behind and secretly set off on a personal journey to live in the wild. Stripping himself of worldly possessions he begins his road trip with the ultimate destination being Alaska.
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Chris McCandless from an Alaska Park Ranger's Perspective
Ranger Peter Christian's analysis is interesting. Although he respects his dream of leaving civilization to be one with nature, what he is criticizing is its execution which was foolhearty, completely unnecessary, and ultimately fatal. I however disagree with his judgment of McCandless'... Read More
Jan 7, 2009 by Octavius |  See all 43 posts
Special Edition
The 2-DVD special edition contains no extras on the first DVD, and not a great deal on the second DVD. The second platter offers "The Story, The Characters" and "The Experience", as well as the trailer. The two featurettes run a total of around 38 minutes or so and do a... Read More
Apr 4, 2008 by black forest elf |  See all 4 posts
HD DVD - does it play on a blu-ray?
Regular DVD's will play on any HD-DVD or Blu-ray player, it's called backwards compatibility. But HD-DVD and Blu-ray will only play in there respected players. Regular DVD player will not be able to play those disks.
Sep 2, 2008 by jwt4000 |  See all 2 posts
Into the Wild in HD DVD
sure is. I already got it in the mail. It's an amazing film. Great picture and sound on HD DVD. I don't care if the format is dead. It's still great while I own it.
Mar 8, 2008 by Bryan A. Mabe |  See all 2 posts
No bluray ?
Paramount originally sided with HD DVD. Now that Blu Ray has won the format "war", Paramount has to come out with new relase dates for movies in Blu Ray. Beowulf should be in the same boat.
Mar 4, 2008 by Philpost7 |  See all 3 posts
Subtitle PT (Portuguese) Be the first to reply
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