Intouchables 2012 R

Amazon Instant Video

(890) IMDb 8.6/10
Available in HD

'The Intouchables' tells the true story of a quadriplegic aristocrat whose world is turned upside down when he hires a young, good-humored ex-con as his caretaker.

Starring:
Francois Cluzet, Omar Sy
Runtime:
1 hour 53 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Intouchables

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Olivier Nakache, Eric Toledano
Starring Francois Cluzet, Omar Sy
Supporting actors Anne Le Ny, Audrey Fleurot, Joséphine de Meaux, Clotilde Mollet, Alba Gaïa Kraghede Bellugi, Cyril Mendy, Salimata Kamate, Absa Diatou Toure, Grégoire Oestermann, Dominique Daguier, François Caron, Christian Ameri, Thomas Solivéres, Dorothée Brière, Marie-Laure Descoureaux, Emilie Caen, Sylvain Lazard, Jean François Cayrey
Studio Weinstein Company
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

What a great movie, great story line and acting.
Carlos
Here's one of those rare movies that make you cry, laugh, and leaves you with a good feeling at the end!
IM
This is one of the best movies I've ever seen, and recommend everyone see it.
Bugsy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

184 of 187 people found the following review helpful By Andy Orrock VINE VOICE on May 12, 2012
Format: DVD
I didn't know a lot about this film heading into a sneak preview in Dallas last week, but left agog at this thrilling, fantastic piece of movie-making from co-directors Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano. It's the best film experience - no, the best theater-going experience - I've had in well some time. I saw it with a keyed-up audience of Francophiles who had clearly heard the buzz and wanted to be there to see what has been called a 'cultural phenomenon' in Europe as it first hits US shores.

Believe the hype. Nakache and Toledano have constructed their film as a Möbius Strip - starting near to the end in seat-gripping introduction as co-protagonists Driss (Omar Sy in a groundbreaking César-winning performance) and Philippe (François Cluzet - Tell No One) race a Maserati Quattroporte through the streets of late-night Paris. Earth, Wind and Fire's "September" never sounded so good. The directors then take us back to the start to show us how the two met.

The film perfectly mixes comedy and poignancy. Sy - a gifted physical and verbal comedian - had our audience convulsed, at times, with laughter. The subject matter - dealing with quadriplegia - doesn't seem ripe for comedy, but the film conveys both Philippe's desire not to be pitied and Driss' guileless honesty. He simply treats Philippe as he would anyone else. He's never been trained to do anything different.

I extend this entreaty to all mainstream movie-goers: lay down your prejudices and aversions to subtitled movies and see this film. Don't miss out. I'm sure Hollywood will re-make this film...and kill it. Please see this original version. No one will pull your man card. You will not be disappointed.
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61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Jay B. Lane TOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 5, 2012
Format: DVD
What a pleasure to review a film when I don't have to reach for good things to say. This heartwarming R-rated comedy is based on a book which tells the true story of two wildly different men who find a common ground and build an enduring friendship based on mutual respect. It was clear from the very beginning that the audience was invested in the story and I loved hearing gales of laughter throughout the theater from beginning to end. Audiences at the 2012 Seattle International Film Festival voted this the "Most Liked" selection.

In this award-winning film from France (English captions), a wealthy aristocrat is paralyzed from a para-gliding accident and has hired many health-care worker/nurses who find caring for a wealthy quadriplegic too intimidating. A chronically unemployed immigrant from Senegal goes for an interview simply to get his application signed so he can continue his public assistance. He tends to be a little rude and doesn't show much respect or pity for the patient, who finds his lack of pity refreshing. The rest, as they say, is history.

We enjoy:
* François Cluzet ("Tell No One") is the aristocrat. His new nurse/attendant is like a splash of cold water right smack in the face (which is the only part of his body with any sensation)!
* Omar Sy ("Micmacs") is the irrepressible nurse who starts out by stealing a Fabergé egg, so he isn't exactly a saint. His incredulity at his first opera is infectious and we all laughed along with our two heroes. And you've gotta see this guy dance!
* Anne Le Ny ("Declaration of War") is charming as the woman who runs the house, the staff, and knows everything. Her slow but steady thaw is so gratifying.
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107 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Whitt Patrick Pond TOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 29, 2012
Format: DVD
The Intouchables, a French film written and directed by the team of Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, is I am moved to say absolutely one of the best films I've seen this year. It is certainly one of the most enjoyable. It is not, strictly speaking, a comedy, but it is so rich in humor and in human comedy that I found myself constantly laughing. While fictional, The Intouchables is closely based on the real-life story of two men so starkly different in background and circumstances that it is difficult to imagine their lives even intersecting, let alone becoming intricately intertwined, and yet they did. How it all came about is the story.

The film begins with Driss (Omar Sy), a young African immigrant, driving a luxurious Maserati sports car at full tilt along the streets of Paris at night. Riding with him is Phillipe (François Cluzet), an older Frenchman with a beard who seems to be taking his companion's breakneck driving with remarkable calm. When the police inevitably start after them, Driss bets Phillipe a hundred euros he can shake them off, which Phillipe takes. When he fails to shake them off, Driss then offers to double the wager that he can turn the police into an escort, to which Phillipe laughingly says he's crazy but accepts the wager anyway. Driss then cons the police into believing that he's speeding because he has to get Phillipe - who can't get out of the car when the police order him to because he's a quadriplegic, paralyzed from the neck down - to the emergency room of a hospital. Phillipe, in spite of the wager, proceeds to support Driss's con by pretending to be having a stroke. The police then hurriedly escort the pair to the nearest hospital, where Driss tells them he can handle things from there, and then the police leave.
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