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Introducing Hegel Paperback – February 25, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Introducing
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Icon Books; 2nd edition (February 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840467851
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840467857
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,909,111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Lloyd Spencer is Senior Lecturer in the School of Media at Trinity and All Saints, a college of the University of Leeds. He has written Introducing the Enlightenment and a biographical study of Walter Benjamin.

Andrzej Krauze is a cartoonist and illustrator whose work is published regularly in the Guardian, the New Statesman, and the Sunday Telegraph.


--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Regan VINE VOICE on September 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
Introducing Hegel, like all the introducing series provides only an introduction to the philosophy of Hegel. Still, I found it interesting. I now know that Hegel's philosophy is tied to history. History, and humanities progress through it, represents our becoming aware that we are self conscious. History is a process of taking a whole broken into fragments and piecing it together into a whole. Hegel was very interested in Napoleon and the French Revolution. He believed the struggle by the oppressed was a struggle for recognition. As the oppressed are the ones who have made the world, they are the ones who benefit most from the experience of history. This aspect of his work is represented in the Master and the Slave where one "person" gets control of another "person" and forces him to do work. But in forcing him to do so the Master becomes dependent on the slave and meanwhile the slave learns the self respect that comes from working. So in the end the Master becomes even more dependent on the slave and the slave becomes free. I think the purpose of the introducing series is to whet your appetite for more and this book certainly has done so. Hegel is a fascinating person and his ideas are well worth exploring.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sid Salcido on March 3, 2010
Format: Paperback
Although today I am an avid reader, when I was a kid, it was comic books that were my main reading source. I didn't like reading books much (thought they were tedious) but I could read a comic book on just about any subject (although I mostly read Spiderman or another Marvel character).

"Introducing Hegel" by Lloyd Spencer and Andrzej Krauze was a book I found in a used bookstore (the first edition) and it was one that was difficult for me to put down. Although it wasn't, obviously, exhaustive, or wasn't necessarily the easiest book to follow, it was interesting enough to teach me things that I never knew about George W.F. Hegel, and did a great thing by tying in his thought with what was going on around him in his life and in the places he lived.

It is my contention that this kind of book can be used by teachers who teach philosophy (or Youth Pastors who want to get their youth to know something about the great philosophers or philosophies around them) to use these to introduce each thinker. For they are fun to read (despite what some reviewers said) and give a good skeleton of the thought of that thinker. It may not be for a college level student, but I think will get people to know more about why they think the way they do than they did previous to reading it, especially young people. This only helps them to shape their thoughts better so they can be more well-rounded thinkers.

I am getting other books in this series just to learn more about the great thoughts and thinkers of the ages!
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By shouldased on May 19, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read and enjoyed many of the "Introducing..." series over the years. And I got a lot from Hegel too. But this edition is so much smaller than they have been in the past that I had to use reading glasses. The sketches became very crowded and instead of a graphic explanation of the text, they became something else that had to be deciphered with a magnifying glass. Old versions were 8 1/2 x 5 1/2; new version 6 1/2 x 4 1/2 with just as much stuff crammed on each page. Cheaper to produce I suppose, harder for me to read.
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4 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K. Draper VINE VOICE on June 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
I picked this up "used" thinking that this illustrated "Intro" might be a fun or useful review of Hegel. It was neither. While the author does hit on most of the main points of Hegel's thinking and his millieu, he does so in such a haphazard, inconsistent way that it ends up being more confusing than enlightening. I was quite aggrevated by way that the author would change tense of the verbs from past to present and back, often on the same page. If a writer cannot maintain consistent use of verb tense, it's hard to take his work seriously. And then I found out that he misused the word "schizophrenia". Twice. I mean, many people misuse that word to mean something like "split personality" or even "thinking two different ways about something", but this is totally inexcusable in a scholarly work, or at least, a work about a scholar.

Page 28 has Hegel remarking: "I sought [past tense] to make amends in the only way I could. My philosophy includes [present tense] a 'schizophrenic' principle of self-division, negation, contradiction...."

Excuse me, Mr. Spencer, only a PERSON can be "schizophrenic", which, btw, means mentally ill (psychotic) with delusions, hallucinations and disordered thinking.

And the artwork is equally distracting because of it's poor quality. Each page is liberally illustrated with pen and ink drawings by Andrezej Krauze, but the drawings are so coarse and poorly done that they further hinder the text, IMHO. His renderings of contemporary philosophers, such as Marcuse and Adorno toward the end of the book are actually quite nice, though, so why does he not take the time to make all the artwork good qualtity?
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
Enough said. This book is short, simple, and sweet.

A fantastic launchpad into Hegel's philosophy of history!
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