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Introduction to Computational Chemistry Hardcover – November 29, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0470011867 ISBN-10: 0470011866 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 624 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 2 edition (November 29, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470011866
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470011867
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 1.5 x 9.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,328,306 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Introduction to Computational Chemistry, Second Edition provides a comprehensive account of the fundamental principles underlying different methods, ranging from classical to sophisticated quantum models. Although the main focus is on molecular structures and energetics, subjects such as molecular properties, dynamic aspects, relative methods and qualitative models are also covered. No prior knowledge of concepts specific to computational chemistry ids required, although some understanding of introductory quantum mechanics and elementary mathematics is assumed.

Thoroughly updated and revised, with many chapters expanded or restructured, this second edition features updated methodologies and references as well as an overview for each chapter.

  • coverage from first principles through to latest advances
  • self-contained chapters
  • basic introduction to both the theory and practical aspects of this rapidly evolving and dynamic area
  • website for additional information

Suitable for students and researchers entering the field of computational chemistry.

About the Author

Frank Jensen obtained his Ph.D. from UCLA in 1987 with Professors C. S. Foote and K. N. Houk, and is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry, SDU, Odense, Denmark. He has published over 80 papers and art6icles, and has made contributions to the widely used program package GAMESS.

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Customer Reviews

Discusses semiempirical, wave mechanics and density functional approaches in great detail.
I_T
First, this book is not pedagogical, you will not learn HOW anything works, just what Jensen or common knowledge says about different methods.
Jeff
Excellent written text with a lot of depth and provides great insight for someone who is starting in computational chemistry.
imouyang

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jose R. Valverde Carrillo on August 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
For a brief, general introduction to Computational Chemistry I prefer Grant & Richards', and for a deeper, detailed description of the whole filed, Leach's. Jensen is mainly oriented towards 'ab initio' methods with a touch of Molecular Mechanics.
This book starts with a short introduction to Molecular Mechanics and Dynamics, and then moves on to 'ab initio' Quantum Chemistry methods, to which it is mainly devoted and where it extends in greater detail. There, it becomes an excellent and deeper introduction to all the methods of Quantum Chemistry, and gets its true value.
Detailed descriptions of the different levels of theory, basis sets, density functional theory, semiempirical methods, relativistic methods, etc... make it an excellent introductory reading. Math coverage is just enough to undertand what is going on and how it will affect the computation, but not enough to help you write or design your own software.
There are lots of examples along the book used to illustrate the points, and an invaluable chapter comparing the different methods, their accuracy and performance and their utility in different calculations. The book carefully avoids tying to specific software packages and keeps examples on a higher level thus maintaining its applicability and generality. This is a good book for those mainly interested in Quantum Methods, wishing to learn about them, how they work and how they are applied in practice, as well as how they are implemented and what this will cost in computability and computer time. The initial chapters on MM and MD are detailed enough to provide a starting link to the methods used for more complex molecular systems.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Jeff on April 17, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a practicing quantum chemist and I own this book, Levine, Szabo, Helgaker, etc. This is by far the worst book for many reasons. First, this book is not pedagogical, you will not learn HOW anything works, just what Jensen or common knowledge says about different methods. Second, Jensen isn't a very good quantum chemist and he's flat out wrong in some places. His remarks on relativistic effects in quantum chemistry elicited a "that's f***ing b***s**t" from an expert in relativistic quantum chemistry I know.

If you want to learn the basics of the methods, Levine, Szabo and Helgaker are the best, in order of difficulty, although review articles (free to academics) and lecture notes found on UGeorgia's CCC home page by David Sherrill are just as good for no cost. I have heard Cramer does a better job at the goal of this book, however, there's no point to writing these quasi-undergraduate textbooks since they aren't classroom-worthy, nor are they useful to any real researcher in the field.

Because one might not care for my review, here is a review in one of the foremost journals in chemistry:

Angewandte Chemie, Int. Ed., September 1999

The large and continually increasing importance of theoretical methods in the solution of chemical problems was impressively documented last year by the conferring of the Nobel price for chemistry on two extraordinary champions of this genre, John Pople and Walter Kohn. Of course, the appearance of Frank Jensen's textbook about computational chemistry could hardly have been better timed.
Read more ›
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
Well, this book is a must-read for those who perform ab initio calculations. If you have enough quantum chemistry background, then this book is a good reference for your electronic structure calculations. However, you can not expect that you can learn HF, MPn, CC, CASSCF, CI, SE, etc., from this book. I think the reason for this book being so popular is because there is lack another one of the same introductory level. This book is not simple enough for a beginner as well as not deep enough for advanced readers. It does not discuss all the topic covered in the book in detail (maybe the capter of basis set is the only exception). This book is also lack of a chaper for calculating thermodynamic properties based on ab initio results. Anyway, this book may fill some gaps of my knowledge on ab initio calculations, but I do not enjoy reading it because it never helps to understand the principle of ab initio. For those who want to learn quantum chemistry/ab initio calc., this is absolutely NOT the one. Levine's quantum chemistry (5th) and modern quantum chemisty are the books written in much better style. For MM, TST/statistical mechanics chapters, which should be removed and leave more space for ab initio, I agree with other reviewers.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By I_T on November 20, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Provides an excellent overview of quantum mechanical computational chemistry methods. Discusses semiempirical, wave mechanics and density functional approaches in great detail. Also goes a good job discussing basis sets, optimization methods etc. Unfortunately, much less attention is given to other computational methods such as molecular mechanics. If one desires an overview of the entire compuational chemistry field, I reccommend Molecular Modeling by Leach. If your interests lie primarily in QM methods, this book has a more complete discussion of these methods than Leach's text.
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