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Introduction to Computational Molecular Biology Hardcover – January 16, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0534952624 ISBN-10: 0534952623 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning; 1 edition (January 16, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0534952623
  • ISBN-13: 978-0534952624
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #399,948 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Preface 1. Basic Concepts of Molecular Biology 2. Strings, Graphs, and Algorithms 3. Sequence Comparison and Database Search 4. Fragment Assembly of DNA 5. Physical Mapping of DNA 6. Phylogenetic Trees 7. Genome Rearrangements 8. Molecular Structure Prediction 9. Epilogue: Computing with DNA Answers to Selected Exercises / References / Index

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 40 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 1998
Format: Hardcover
The book gives a brief introduction on the mathematical structures used, without getting lost in mathematical obscurities. The algorithmic representation of all models make it easy to implement the models. It is a book of great practical use. I very strongly recommend this book for biologists as well as computer scientists interested in the area of biocomputing.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a good book on some of the algortihms used in bioinformatics. That term may not have been in wide use back in `97, leading to the title that suggests a lot more focus on the molecules than is in fact present.

The book starts with two brief chapters on biology and mathematical basics - graph theory and algorithm analysis. I'm sorry to say that these really are too brief. A reader who comes in with little knowledge of either topic will probably leave with about the same level of knowledge.

After that, the authors give coverage of the basics, as `97 writers saw them: approximate string matching, fragment assembly, mapping, trees, and a discussion of the reversals that occur in DNA over evolutionary time. Each topic is presented carefully, in a number of variations, and with formal analysis of the algorithmic complexity. That last won't do much for the biologists in the crowd, but gives programmers a good idea of how each technique will behave as the problems grow larger (and they always do). The presentation generally stick with the most popular algorithms, emphasizing detailed presentation over breadth of coverage. Multiple alignment, in particular, could have used a lot more pages. Also, topics like assembly and restriction digests aren't at the forefront of analysis any more. They're important, but good algorithms exist in widely available tools, and more advanced analyses tend to attract more attention these days. The section on genome rearrangements is quite good, but seems to stand alone - it could have been one input into tree building, but the authors don't draw any clear relationships between the reorderings and any other problems.

The section on structure prediction is definitely showing its age.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Edmund Paley on February 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is a really nice introduction to the most commonly used algorithms in bioinformatics. It is not really a general introduction to molecular biology or to computer science, and to make best use of this book a reader probably needs some prior exposure to both. But, for someone who has had a basic course in say genetics, and a basic programming course that covers simple data structures and algorithms etc., this volume provides all they will need to understand what is really happening when they run a BLAST search, for instance. A serious computer-science type person will probably not find the alogorithms described here very interesting, because they aren't meant to be elegant or interesting, just useful. I think a reader would have to have some direct interest in bioinformatics per se in order to enjoy this book. One thing that I find particularly nice is that the length of the chapters is just right so that you can read through a chapter in a single sitting, and because the chapters are largely independent of one another, its a handy book to have around and pick up when one has a little spare time. I recommend it very strongly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jv on October 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The one I have is from 1997. Concepts haven't changed no, but it is really annoying to read some of the numbers they toss out. Like a 700 pair limit electrophoresis, not on today's machines... The language barrier can come through at times, lightly, but still incorrect grammar here and there.

Bottom line: old, small, expensive. Fine an alternative.
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