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An Introduction to Galaxies and Cosmology Hardcover – June 14, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0521837385 ISBN-10: 0521837383

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June 14, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521837383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521837385
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 8.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,651,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Written in an accessible style that avoids complex mathematics, and illustrated in color throughout, this book is suitable for self-study and will appeal to amateur astronomers as well as undergraduate students." Astronomical Society of the Pacific

"The authors have achieved a great deal by producing a comprehensible textbook with very little mathematics. The chapters on cosmology are bang up-to-date, and succeed in putting across challenging concepts in an understandable way. The book is also well-illustrated and very nicely produced." Professor Alan Heavens, University of Edinburgh

Book Description

This textbook has been designed by a team of experts for introductory university courses in astronomy and astrophysics. Beginning with a description of the structure and history of the Milky Way, it introduces normal and active galaxies in general. A wide range of cosmological models are then presented, including a discussion of the Big Bang and Universe expansion. Written in an accessible style that avoids complex mathematics, the book is suitable for self-study and will appeal to amateur astronomers as well as undergraduate students.

Customer Reviews

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The most inteligent and simple book I have read.
Bernal Delgado Castro
Vis a vis the cosmology aspects of the book, I compared the Jones/Lambourne text with the book written by Schneider (called "Extargalactic Astronomy and Cosmology").
Jim
Also has an excellent detailed description of galactic spectra.
R. Markham

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By R. Markham on May 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book deserves six stars. It is the companion book to "An Introduction to the Sun and Stars", (actually there are four books in the series but these two are the most closely related). I bought both books to follow-up the introductory astronomy text "Voyages to the Stars and Galaxies" by Fraknoi, Morrison, and Wolff. I was so impressed with "Voyages", it has been the standard by which I have measured other astronomy texts. "Sun and Stars", was an excellent book, but it didn't quite measure up to the clarity of "Voyages". In contrast, "Galaxies and Cosmology" is every bit as good as "Voyages". The scope is more limited than "Voyages", but the depth of the material covered is deeper. It is a perfect book to follow an introductory text such as "Voyages". Where "Voyages" gave a broad introduction to astronomy with essentially no math, "Galaxies and Cosmology" follows up with a more in depth treatment of galactic astronomy and cosmology that includes a fair amount of math, but nothing beyond basic algebra. Only algebra? Absolutely! This text walks an incredible line between a purely conceptual book, and a university level math heavy text for an astronomy major.

As with "An Intro to the Sun and Stars", "An Intro to Galaxies and Cosmology" has an excellent set of questions and problems which do a very good job of illuminating and clarifying key concepts. The problems are not difficult, requiring nothing more than a decent high school math background including algebra and trigonometry, but their strength is in illuminating the concepts beyond just a descriptive narrative.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dean Welch on April 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I think this is a great intermediate level book on galaxies and cosmology. The writing style is clear and easy to follow. There are many useful diagrams and a fair number of beautiful images.

The first part of the book focuses on galaxies. The Milky Way is the subject of the first chapter. In addition to providing a nice description of the galaxy we live in, a lot of concepts are introduced that are needed for the remainder of the book. This includes things like globular clusters, open clusters, density waves, stellar halos, HR diagrams, rotation curves and dark matter.

This is followed by a chapter on normal galaxies. The Hubble classification of galaxies is covered here. The treatment goes beyond morphology, it also describes the properties these classifications have (for example mass to gas ratio) and how they are measured. A very high level view of structure formation is given. This topic is treated in more detail in the cosmology part. The extremely important topic of the cosmological distance ladder is covered.

The following chapter on active galaxies is excellent. In addition to describing the types of active galaxies, it explains the current models of how they are powered. It also provides reasons for thinking that they are fundamentally the same kind of thing, just being viewed in different ways by us. This is followed by a chapter on the large scale distribution of galaxies which provides a nice transition to the study of cosmology.

The cosmology part is equal in quality to the galaxies part. It opens with a qualitative discussion of general relativity. Obviously it isn't very detailed, the most complicated part presented is the Robertson-Walker line element.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Gianluca on September 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
I was amazed by this book, as well as by the others completing the series. The argument is handled in a very clear way and I really believe this book is just perfect for those starting their interest or studies in astronomy. It is well up-to-date and provides nice images.

Definitely a must have, also for those working in different areas and wishing to 2refresh2 their knowledge.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The most inteligent and simple book I have read. All topics of the book are explained in a very simple and elegant way. I have enjoyed a lot reading this interesting book. I would recommend it without hesitation.
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