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Introduction to Graph Theory (4th Edition) Paperback – May 2, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0582249936 ISBN-10: 0582249937 Edition: 4th

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Paperback, May 2, 1996
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 4 edition (May 2, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0582249937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0582249936
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,411,790 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Graph Theory has recently emerged as a subject in its own right, as well as being an important mathematical tool in such diverse subjects as operational research, chemistry, sociology and genetics. Robin Wilson's book has been widely used as a text for undergraduate courses in mathematics, computer science and economics, and as a readable introduction to the subject for non-mathematicians.

The opening chapters provide a basic foundation course, containing such topics as trees, algorithms, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, planar graphs and colouring, with special reference to the four-colour theorem. Following these, there are two chapters on directed graphs and transversal theory, relating these areas to such subjects as Markov chains and network flows. Finally, there is a chapter on matroid theory, which is used to consolidate some of the material from earlier chapters.

For this new edition, the text has been completely revised, and there is a full range of exercises of varying difficulty. There is new material on algorithms, tree-searches, and graph-theoretical puzzles. Full solutions are provided for many of the exercises.

Robin Wilson is Dean and Director of Studies in the Faculty of Mathematics and Computing at the Open University.

About the Author

Robin Wilson is Emeritus Professor of Pure Mathematics at the Open University, and Emeritus Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London. He is also a former Fellow in Mathematics at Keble College, Oxford University, and now teaches at Pembroke College. He has written and edited almost 40 books on graph theory, combinatorics, the history of mathematics, and music, and is very involved with the communication and popularisation of mathematics.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 31, 1999
Format: Paperback
A great -and gentle - introduction to Graph Theory... clear definitions and examples, great figures, useful exercises, and even some clever quotes. Everything you could ask for - if only all texts were this clear and well-organized. This was my first foray into the topic, and Wilson's text made it enjoyable.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JVB on May 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
This author has a charming writing style, although he suffers from a mathematician's sense of humor. A light introduction to graph theory, suitable for a beginning undergraduate student. Nothing is covered particularly in-depth, and the more difficult proofs are passed over and left to the reader to find and master. The exercises are very important--many of the most important theorems are hidden in there. This text is suitable for independent study, although an advisor would be helpful simply because the theorems hidden in the exercises make you want to have your homework checked.

A further note on proofs: many of those that the author does include are constructionist, and seem to involve a lot of hand-waving. There are very few rigorous proofs, and a teacher using this book should instruct his or her students in the more formal approach to graph theory proofs. This text could benefit from including more.

On the whole: nice diagrams, good notation, good order of material, and very accessible.

I read this text during an undergraduate combinatorics course after having taken a semester of introductory graph theory.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Loved it" is a strong classification but it is a high-quality, college-level introduction to graph theory. I found the course and text highly interesting and this text help immeasurably.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Redmond Geek on August 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a very, very thin introductory work on graph theory.

It loses one star because the section numbering and the chapter numbering aren't aligned correctly. (The section numbers increase monotonically from 1 to N. Chapter breaks are inserted almost randomly as a way of grouping sections.)

It loses another star because it doesn't serve the needs of beginners very well. As a previous reviewer has pointed out, it doesn't contain many examples, and results are often stated with only sketch proofs.

It loses one final star because of its ridiculous price. For the same dollar amount, one could buy a good introductory book (such as Chartrand's "Introduction to Graph Theory"), a Schaum's outline (for solved problems), and a decent high-level book for mathematical depth.

On the positive side, Prentice did print this thing on good paper...
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful By John on December 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have found this book difficult to read because of its lack of examples and theorems.Many famous examples and theorems are left as exercises.Many of them are too difficult for a beginner.The book just state some basic defintion and theorem without examples, and even some proofs of the theorems are not complete.Many algorithms are skipped or illustrated badly.I can give no reason for the beginner to buy this book. I would suggest the reader to see "A first Look At Graph Theory" by John O. Clark
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