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Introduction to the Code of Maimonides (Mishneh Torah) (Yale Judaica Series) Paperback – September 10, 1982


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Introduction to the Code of Maimonides (Mishneh Torah) (Yale Judaica Series) + A Maimonides Reader (Library of Jewish Studies) + The Guide of the Perplexed, Vol. 1
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (September 10, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300028466
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300028461
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 5.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #168,599 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By J. Socher on December 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
I'm not familiar enough with the Twersky's book (though I have read parts of it and it is quite useful as a reference to the works of Maimonides), but I can't let M;Jones reveiw pass without comment. Virtually every sentence in the review is false in part. First, among Jewish scholars probably no post-talmudic has been *more* read than MT, so calling it little read seems quite strange. It was one of the first Jewish books printed and has been continuously in print ever since. So much for "few have read it."

Secondly the review acts as if MT is not based on (and indeed is an interpretations of as well as restatement of) the vast rabbinic literature and Jewish law that came before it.

Finally, the idea that MT does not have Maiminides own views is quite false. The whole work, although it is a restatement of Rabbinic law, is also permeated with Maimonides religio-philosophical ideas.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful way to be introduced to Maimonides and the Mishnah Torah (repetition of the Torah) with lots of cross references to his many other works by a scholar of great note.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very approachable introduction to the works of Maimonides. Twersky really brings Maimonides' intellectual force and rationalistic and philosophically-informed approach to religion to life with selected snippets across different works. He also manages to sketch a portrait of a man stuck in a beleaguered circumstance struggling with adversity and yet pouring out works of insight and leadership that brought knowledge and courage to his co-religionists spread across Europe and the Levant.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sam Illescas on May 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book because of its content. However, I ordered the hard cover version and I did not get it. In spite of that, I am completely satisfied.
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14 of 42 people found the following review helpful By M; Jones on September 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
Mishneh Torah (MT) is an essential work in human history, though few people have read it. It is a bit like Newton's Principia, important though few living now have read the original (in Latin). In somewhat the same way that Colridge's interpretation of Hamlet has become the more-or-less standard concept of the character and play, Maimonides' interpretation of Torah has become pretty standard, though more modern commentaries present quite different interpretations. MT's view is extremely ethnocentric. To people who have studied both Torah itself and MT, it may seem (as to me) that MT is the more ethnocentric, though MT's view is justified by the fundamental presumption of Maimonidese: That Jacob is the model for behavior whom ought be copied and emulated. Some more modern commentaries have rejected this fundamental assumption, and, as religions are fundamental assumptions, may be viewed as contr-Judaic at least in the traditional form. MT does more than make comments upon the Torah, of course. There are rules of numerous kinds, as a Jew ought not live in a town that does not have a good physician, a Jew may go to a Gentile physician only at the point of death and a Jew must accept death rather than be treated by an apostate physician. These rules may be prejudiced a bit by Maimonides' being a physician; however, the last rule, about the apostate physician, is quite consistent with the general view that the focus of God is upon the population over time of the Chosen People, and not upon the individual. Rabbinnic rulings reflect this view to this day, as the one recently in Israel that a disruptive student should be dismissed rather than slow or prevent the remainder of the class from learning.Read more ›
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