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Introduction to Numerical Analysis (Texts in Applied Mathematics) Hardcover – August 21, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0387954523 ISBN-10: 038795452X Edition: 3rd

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Product Details

  • Series: Texts in Applied Mathematics (Book 12)
  • Hardcover: 746 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 3rd edition (August 21, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038795452X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387954523
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #795,618 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

From the reviews of the third edition:

"This is the third edition of a famous work on the basics of numerical analysis. It is a well-written textbook for advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate students containing both classical methods and modern approaches to numerical mathematics. The theory is illustrated by many interesting examples, and carefully selected exercises lead the reader to a better understanding of the topics discussed. … The third edition contains new material and several improved passages and will be useful also for those who already use the previous editions." (European Mathematical Society Newsletter, September, 2003)

"This is the third edition of a textbook first published in 1980. It is intended as a comprehensive introduction to … numerical analysis for the final year undergraduate or beginning graduate student. … As a reference work it is clearly organized and the table of contents … makes it easier to refer to individual sections. … it will serve both as an invaluable reference and as a means to acquire some more theoretical background … ." (Gerry Leversha, The Mathematical Gazette, Vol. 88 (512), 2004)

"Among the book’s many particular features … we would like to emphasize the excellent presentation of the following topics: fast Fourier transform methods, thorough discussion of the most important minimization methods, solution of stiff or implicit ordinary differential equations, solution of differential algebraic systems, basics of multigrid methods. … This … makes the present well-written book very profitable for every reader interested in or working on problems of Numerical Analysis." (Ferenc Móricz, Acta Scientiarum Mathematicarum, Vol. 69, 2003)


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S. Penny on October 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This text makes a decent reference book, but I find that the introduction of new ideas is not accompanied with sufficient explanation or motivation. I find myself continuously refering back to Burden and Faires, "Numerical Analysis" instead for more clear and concise descriptions of the same concepts. While our professor required the book for the course (because it is on the book list for qualifying exams), he rarely refers to it. I have accumulated about 5 numerical analysis books now, and I would recommend Burden and Faires, "Numerical Analysis" (7th edition) as the best for senior undergradute to 1st-year graduate level, as it has the best combination of theory, explanation, and examples. Stoer presents slightly more theoretical motivation to problems, which I think would be more interesting the second time around, but not as an 'Introduction'.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Soares on April 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
In the course of my graduate studies, I got lots of books in Numerical Mathematics. I read most of them, at least the chapters related to my work in Computer-Aided Design and Simulation of electronic circuits.
I have some of the books in several editions, as happens with this book from Stoer & Bulirsch (I have the 2nd and 3rd eds. of S&B). It isn't an easy read, and I remember having had some "viscous friction" in getting into the notation, a minor annoyment quickly surpassed. But when I had to jump into theorem proofs and fine tuning of algorithms, this book was the preferred. I recommend the chapters on Linear Systems, on solving Nonlinear Equations and on solving Ordinary Differential Equations, which I "used" a lot. This last 3rd edition already has some material about solving Linear Systems of equations with Krylov Space methods, such as GMRES.
As happens with many books, it can be complemented with texts offering a different point of view on Numerical Analysis. I recommend the classics from Hamming Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers, from Lanczos Applied Analysis, from Dahlquist and Bjork Numerical Methods, from Atkinson
...Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Somebody on February 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book is NOT an introduction!!

This book is NOT an introduction!!

If the portait of Mona Lisa is put 10 feet away in front of you, you see a beautiful picture. If the portait of Mona Lisa is put 2 inches away in front of you, you see chunks of paint. This book puts the portrait of Mona Lisa 2 inches away in front of you. As the result, you see chunks of paint.

If you are taught one thing each day, you learn one thing every day. After a year, you have learned 365 things. If you are taught 1000 things each day, you learn nothing every day, and after a year, you have learned nothing! This book tries to teach you 1000 things each day. As the result, you learn nothing.

Reading this book is a waste of time. The few things you can learn is not worth the confusion.

Yes, it might be a good reference. But for an introduction, find another book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Math Geek on September 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book is decent as a reference book but it rather dense for someone who is learning the material the first time. (I'm using this book for a graduate course after having seen much of the material as an undergraduate and it's still a little difficult to read.)

It also has an inexcusable amount of typos in it. By the third edition, this really shouldn't be a problem.
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