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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid, in-depth exploration
I am almost completely new to programming and am trying to teach myself. I started with a computer science textbook on Python and then moved on to the 8th edition of this book. Around Chapter 14, I saw they they had come out with the 9th edition, so I purchased it. I am studying for the Java SE7 Associates certification next month, so I started over at the beginning of...
Published on April 24, 2012 by Kyle D. Walker

versus
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars KINDLE Version NOT Worth It
NOTE: This is a review of the KINDLE version. The content of the book is fine; please use other reviews to guide your purchase based on content. My objective is to inform the buyer if they want, or not, the Kindle version.

The caption claiming this book looks exactly like the print version is inaccurate. The reason is that 40% of the book is missing. How...
Published 17 months ago by Robert Reese


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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid, in-depth exploration, April 24, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
I am almost completely new to programming and am trying to teach myself. I started with a computer science textbook on Python and then moved on to the 8th edition of this book. Around Chapter 14, I saw they they had come out with the 9th edition, so I purchased it. I am studying for the Java SE7 Associates certification next month, so I started over at the beginning of the book and have read back to where I was in the 8th edition (Chapter 16). There have been many changes and updates. One of the most visible changes is that the review questions are now spread throughout the chapter rather than all together at the end of the chapter. The video notes are now available. While not adding a lot of commentary to what's already in the text, I do find it helpful to watch the videos (which feature the examples being worked out for you). There are also practice tests available online. I've taken the first two of these and find them quite challenging and helpful (especially with a certification exam around the corner for me!). I am reading other texts as well (Head First Java and Java The Complete Reference). Liang's book is hefty and taking me forever to get through, but I'm confident that I'll be very solid by the time I'm done. The author, by the way, is very responsive via email whenever I come across typos in the book. These errata are listed on the book's website, so it's good to check there whenever you move on to a new chapter. I highly recommend the book!
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars KINDLE Version NOT Worth It, August 20, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
NOTE: This is a review of the KINDLE version. The content of the book is fine; please use other reviews to guide your purchase based on content. My objective is to inform the buyer if they want, or not, the Kindle version.

The caption claiming this book looks exactly like the print version is inaccurate. The reason is that 40% of the book is missing. How? The book comes with a code that enables you to download the other 40%, or "bonus" material. The eBook version does NOT come with that. It is an additional $24 charge. In other words, you don't get the 'whole book' unless you buy the 5 lbs of dead trees.

The Kindle app on the computer is clunky, making reading this an arduous task at best; for example, you'll wear out your mouse scroll wheel trying to scroll down the page. This isn't a PDF and the Kindle software is impotent in comparison to PDF reader software.

The price *SEEMS* good, until you realize that you'll have to pay an additional $24 for the "bonus" chapters, and another $42 for the MyProgramming Lab access. If the price was $80 for the eBook, added to the $24 for the rest of the book plus the $42 for the lab access, the $150 list price is exactly the same. BUT, you *cannot* sell an eBook, but you CAN sell the paper book. Getting just $5 for the paper version makes that a better deal financially, even if it means laying waste to a virtual forest for this massive tome.

In other words, it will COST YOU MORE MONEY for the Kindle version. The only two benefits are the text tools (search, copy/paste) and the lack of needing Conan the Barbarian to tote it around for you.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Comprehensive! Easy Transition from C++ to Java for me!, August 28, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
/**
* @Use: Used for a college programming course.
* @Class: Java Programming I
* @Other: Experience in C++/C, PHP, JavaScript, Perl, SQL [MySQL, Oracle PL/SQL, SQL Server]
*
* =============================================
** This Book is meant to be used in an academia
* =============================================
*; not ideal book for self study
*/
This book was required for a Java Programming I course that I took which had a basic CS Programming course (in java or in my case c++) as a prerequisite. When used in an academic setting, the book is accompanied by very useful powerpoint slides and other material including 15 additional chapters(#35 - #50).

/**
* book@review:~$ ./Math -required
*
* Reader should have passed a college
* algebra and/or discrete math course.
* Discrete math preferred but not
* required.
*
* Continue? (Y/N) Y
*
* Reader should know how to perform oper-
* -ations on matrices (add, mult, etc).
*
* Continue? (Y/N) Y
*
* Reader should have a solid understanding
* of logic, possibly with knowledge of
* basic logic gates.
*
* Continue? (Y/N) N
*
* Goodbye.
* book@review:~$ exit
*/

// Why the math requirement?
The reason that you should have satisfactory college mathematics experience is because the author
explains language constructs using simple mathematical algorithms. This seems to be popular in comp-
-uter science and most good CS books should include algorithms such as Monte Carlo's Pi Simulation,
Fibonacci Sequence (Recursion), Calculating Primes, Trees(Application of Discrete Math),
Graphs(Application Discrete Math), Towers of Hanoi, etc.

If you're not in college or haven't passed college algebra or discrete math (or any higher math class) don't worry!
It would greatly benefit you if you went to the library and picked up some math books [textbooks or 'regular books'].
If math has never been a strong point for you, don't worry. Programming and math are both very similar. Many people
who struggled with math find it easier once they have developed good programming habits. This is because programming
applies mathematical logic and problem solving. Math is all about algorithms, just like computer programs are. You
should be excited to learn about science, because thats what 'computer science' is, a science! And just like any other
science it involves math! But the math it involves is not quite the math you had in high school. You will want to
learn the maths that apply most to computer science, and later possibly other sciences as well. That is, you should
learn the following:
Discrete Math - Finite Math - Boolean Algebra - Abstract Algebra - Statistics
Don't worry, you don't need to become an expert in these maths. You definitely should rent at least one book on all
of them though, separately so that you don't overwhelm yourself. Start with discrete math and when you get through
that you can continue on to this book or other heavy programming texts. From there you can simultaneously skim texts
of the other disciplines, hopefully in the order listed. (Finite math is important because it will introduce you to
matrices and how to perform operations on them {think arrays!}.)

In addition to getting your math prerequisites in order I highly suggest skimming some other science books as well.
You may be especially interested in computer organization and architecture, or digital circuit design (another app-
-lication of mathematical logic), electricity, physics, or any electrical engineering books on signal processing,
RFID, Telecommunications, etc. Hopefully you get as excited as I do about learning new things.

Back to the book, the book is thick and should not be rushed through. This book is most useful when accompanied by the extra material online as well as lectures/labs. You should also be doing programming on your own outside of the book. This is a great book for class, and you shouldn't read to far ahead if you're using it for class. Instead, read it through and then skim it over and take notes. If theres anything you don't understand you can write it down and ask about it in the lecture/lab.

I would not recommend this book for a self learner who has no experience in computer science or programming. If you're a self learner and don't have the math/computer knowledge required to use this book it will only cause you trouble down the road. This book assumes you've taken a basic cs class and understand computer organization and architecture..
[can you easily convert numbers between base systems? Binary, Hexadecimal, Octal, Decimal]
[can you explain how process memory segmentation works? data, text, stack, heap]
[are you familiar with fibonacci, prime numbers, sets, matrices, functions]
[do you know what a bus is? what the cpu is? why RAM is volatile and what that means?
..what the ALU is? what a register is?]

If you answered no to any of those questions you would probably be better suited learning from something a little more basic!

All in all this is a great java computer science book! This is a great book for weeding out those who are passionate about computer science/programming and those who aren't. I think the people who complained about this book may have other issues, cause the book is not one of them!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nearly Perfect (But Not Quite), August 2, 2013
This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
Liang's book is clear, comprehensive, and accurate. The problems are meaningful and written at the appropriate level given the reader's progress through the book. Additionally, the book is at the same time broad and specific.

However, the quality (at least in the 7th edition) really drops off when Liang starts talking about the Java Collections Framework. Suddenly, explanations are far and few between, and you're mostly reading things you could easily find online. All the stuff about sets/queues/trees/graphs etc. could better be learned in either Reges & Stepp's Building Java Programs (covers the basics of lists, queues, stacks, binary trees) or Goodrich & Tamassia's Data Structures and Algorithms (also covers deques, other types of trees, graphs, hash tables, etc).

It's still worth your money, because it excels in places that those other books don't, but just know that in order to really understand complex programming Java, you're going to need a bunch of books.

Table of Contents (copied from Liang's website):

Chapter 1 Introduction to Computers, Programming, and Java
Chapter 2 Elementary Programming
Chapter 3 Selections
Chapter 4 Loops
Chapter 5 Methods
Chapter 6 Single-Dimensional Arrays
Chapter 7 Multidimensional Arrays
Chapter 8 Objects and Classes
Chapter 9 Strings
Chapter 10 Thinking in Objects
Chapter 11 Inheritance and Polymorphism
Chapter 12 GUI Basics
Chapter 13 Graphics
Chapter 14 Exception Handling and Text I/O
Chapter 15 Abstract Classes and Interfaces
Chapter 16 Event-Driven Programming
Chapter 17 GUI Componenets
Chapter 18 Applets and Multimedia
Chapter 19 Binary I/O
Chapter 20 Recursion
Chapter 21 Generics
Chapter 22 Lists, Stacks, Queues, and Priority Queues
Chapter 23 Sets and Maps
Chapter 24 Developing Efficient Algorithms
Chapter 25 Sorting
Chapter 26 Implementing Lists, Stacks, Queues, and Priority Queues
Chapter 27 Binary Search Trees
Chapter 28 Hashing
Chapter 29 AVL Trees
Chapter 30 Graphs and Applications
Chapter 31 Weighted Graphs and Applications
Chapter 32 Multithreading and Parallel Programming
Chapter 33 Networking
Chapter 34 Java Database Programming

-----

available online:

Chapter 35 Internationalization
Chapter 36 JavaBeans and Bean Events
Chapter 37 Containers, Layout Managers, and Borders
Chapter 38 Menus, Toolbars, and Dialogs
Chapter 39 MVC and Swing Models
Chapter 40 JTable and JTree
Chapter 41 Advanced Java Database Programming
Chapter 42 Servlets
Chapter 43 JavaServer Pages
Chapter 44 JavaServer Faces 2
Chapter 45 Web Services
Chapter 46 Remote Method Invocation
Chapter 47 2-4 Trees and B-Trees
Chapter 48 Red-Black Trees
Chapter 49 Java 2D
Chapter 50 Testing Using JUnit
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Java Book, August 22, 2012
This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
I highly recommend this book to any Java beginner or anyone who want to brush-up core Java. All 50 Chapters are in depth and clear.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lacking in some areas but still good, March 25, 2013
By 
Mohammad (Oslo, Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
I bought the 8th version last year, and then I bought the 9th a few weeks ago. This book is one of the best places to begin learning Java.

Pros:
+ Short chapters that make you feel you are progressing fast.
+ Code examples aren't overly long
+ Solutions to even numbered exercises are provided on the author's page
+ Nice layout and helpful visuals that make learning easier

Cons:
- Object oriented programming is tough. Liang doesn't explain some of the concepts well enough
- Sometimes concepts are introduced by using short snippets instead of a complete working program.

Overall I'd say this is a good start for someone wanting to learn programming. Someone who already knows a language should look somewhere else. For beginners this is excellent. While it may not cover everything as good as I wish, it still gives a good introduction to Java.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exact replica of the print version, February 3, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This download is an exact replica of the print copy of Intro to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition). It's exactly what I meant to order and is completely satisfactory.

This is a 5-star product.

I've deducted 1 star because the of the e-text's title: "uPDF 2-download (9th Edition)". It's not descriptive of the product being sold and should be corrected to match the actual book title.

5/1/2014 follow up: I've restored the 5th star now that the e-text's title has been corrected.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great price for text book, December 7, 2012
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This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
This book is a requirement for Both the basic and advanced Java courses at my college, I couldn't find it as inexpensive as I did on here. I had purchased the international edition. One word DON'T. While the instruction is the same, the exercises are different, and some instructors assign the exercises from the textbook. Get this US version if you are taking the class in the US, especially at HCC in Tampa.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Big book, December 28, 2012
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This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
Has all of the relevant information needed for my java class. If you learn everything between the covers, you will know alot about java.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars yet another college textbook review, August 1, 2014
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This review is from: Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) (Paperback)
I did two semesters with this book. Its ok but it got a little wordy at times (I guess that is the Java bleeding through into the English used to describe it!)
This would probably be a better book for people who have _zero_ experience programming; if you already know how to program (especially with other C family languages) you'll find this book far too verbose and basic at times.
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Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition)
Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (9th Edition) by Y. Daniel Liang (Paperback - March 12, 2012)
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