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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Paperback – January 1, 2005


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Paperback, January 1, 2005
$31.00 $32.95

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 468 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson Prentice Hall; 2nd edition (2005)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000N5N284
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #790,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

This book is very clearly written, well understandable.
TK
I used this text book for my undergraduate quantum mechanics class.
Christine E. Nattrass
The problems in the book are very helpful and well organized.
Jun Zhou Zhang

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

176 of 186 people found the following review helpful By Christine E. Nattrass on April 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I used this text book for my undergraduate quantum mechanics class. In that class, we covered basically everything in Griffiths. I have since gone on to graduate school. I have found myself very well prepared and I still use Griffiths as a reference because it explains basic ideas and basic problems better than most other text books. More importantly, it provided me with a good foundation for further study.
This text book is a great introductory text book. It is a text book for students for whom quantum mechanics is a new subject. It is not a text book for people who already know any significant amount of quantum mechanics, nor is it a great text to use for independent study (unless you work the problems and have some way of checking yourself.)
Shankar is too advanced for most students new to the subject. It's also too much material to cover in a standard two semester course where the material is completely new. The only school I know of which uses it is Yale, and they count on students having a stronger background than most students at most schools have. Moreover, I know from personal experience that teachers at Yale focus on getting students to calculate the right answer rather than developing a solid understanding of the ideas behind the physics.
It's also too much material to cover in a standard two semester course where the material is completely new. Griffiths is designed such that it can be used for the quantum mechanics classes at most universities -- ie, if students haven't had every other physics class before they use this book or if some of their background is a little weak, they aren't screwed.
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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By sdl;kfjjeoimv on February 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I liked Griffith's Introduction to Quantum Mechanics a great deal. I liked his Electrodynamics book too. What I like most about Griffiths is that if something is important he will say so, if something is difficult he will say so, if something confounds everyone who sees it he will say so. Many other authors in physics pretend to be computers, and leave any intuition or feeling about the material they introduce entirely to the reader to learn for himself. We are not computers, we all understand things in very human ways, although I think the proud like to pretend everything is obvious to them and that personal comments such as Griffiths provides just insults their prodigous intelligence.

The only problem I have with the book is that the shmucks didn't put a single answer in there. That's why I didn't give it 5 stars. How are you supposed to learn it if you don't know where you might have gone wrong in your answers?
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54 of 67 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have read the first 4 chapters of the 1st Ed, and carefully looked at the 2nd. The book is an introduction to wave mechanics, starting with the Schrodinger Eq on the first page! It feels like he doesn't begin at the begining. He should at least give brief comments on the development of quantum ideas (both wave and matrix) and JUSTIFY why the wave approach is more suited as an introduction. What are the advantages and disadvantages?
All these jumps add up: when you try to work the problems you are working with wavefunctions like you've known them all your life! One could find this and that, but I was never sure how the results could be used (in an experimental setting for example). What system does this wavefunction represent, or at least approximate, give the reader some motivation for working on a problem for almost an hour.
I would also say the book is dull, because the author explains every single math step he takes. Sometimes it is helpful, but most of the time it kills the thrill. In places where things are harder to explain in details this approach is abandoned; in chapter 3 you'll find plenty of math rushed. In the 2nd Ed. the author breaks some of the more basic part of Ch. 3 into an appendix, but doesn't really improve on the writing. Apperantly it is believed that students of physics have never heard of seperation of variables but are at home with complex vector spaces. This is an unjustifiable approach. I bet if you take an average linear algebra course in US, you won't encounter: complex vector spaces, properties of hermitian matricies, not too much on diagonaliztion and change of basis. The 2nd Ed. does add 3-4 more examples in each chapter; that should save some problem solving time.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A. Potter on May 15, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Pros:
1. Griffiths has a knack for clearly elucidating each concept, and strikes a good balance between verbiosity and conciseness. This makes the book an easy read.
2. There are plenty of excercises rangeing from easy to relatively difficult in each section.
3. The book covers a lot of ground, and is good as a first exposure to some upper level concepts (statistal mech., solid state phys, systems identical particles).
4. He spends some time covering the philisophical implications of the subject, which is really important.

Cons:
1. The first couple of chapters let you get comfortable with the Schroedinger formulation in 1D, but I feel like he focuses a little too much on calculations (of expectation values, uncertainties, etc...) This amounts to a lot of integration, without a whole lot of insight. (However he makes up for this in Chapter 3 when he introduces the formalism)
2. The book's good for a first (undergraduate) introduction to QM, but it doesn't go in depth on a lot of the topics it covers. It does a pretty good job on perturbation theory, but kind of skimps on Angular Momentum, symmetries, etc... Also it doesn't do anything with the path integral formulation.
3. The relatively low level of rigor means that this isn't a good upper level book.

Conclusion: Good introductory book, but you'll need more eventually.
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