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An Introduction to Thermal Physics Hardcover – August 28, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0201380279 ISBN-10: 0201380277 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 1 edition (August 28, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201380277
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201380279
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,715 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

This is the best introduction to thermal physics books I've been able to find.
L. Bovard
This text is very well written with clear explanations and succinct abstractions to aid in thinking about the material.
Physics Phreak
Also, there are NO answers in the back of the book to check if the work you did do on the problems is even correct.
student

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Dubson on September 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is best text on Statistical Mechanics and Thermo available at the advanced undergrad level. None of the other texts at this level can compete: Reif contains eveything but doesn't distinguish between important ideas and unimportant details. Kittel and Kroemer is too terse. Baierlein is too long-winded and idiosyncratic. Schroeder's text strikes just the right level: the big ideas are clearly explained and well-motivated. I like the order of presentation. The math is at the right level, the problems are excellent. There is even some humor. I have only two (minor) complaints: 1) the derivation of the entropy of an ideal gas involves some uncertainty-principle-hand-waving when a straight-forward counting of particle-in-a-box states would have done the job. 2) There is little or no discussion of transport properties: diffusion, thermal conductitivy, viscosity, and the like. If you don't like this book, then you won't like the others on this subject.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By MyView on June 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is one the best physics book I've seen. Like in all physics books, it is expected that you understand the preceding text before you gain ability to do a problem 'quickly'. But in this book understanding actually happens because, unlike most books, the whole book is written intuitively. The tone of the writing is nice also; you wiil NOT find the unnecessary 'of course' and 'obvious' sprinkled throughout, which were are a common occurrence in more annoying texts. The laws of thermodyanmics, especially the 2nd, are clearely illustrated in fair amounts 'theoretical' detail. For the more 'everyday' aspects chapter 4 and the thermodynmics parts of my freshman physics textbook were useful; in fact, its a good idea to read the thermo part of the freshman physics book while or before reading Ch. 1 of this book). The arguments and estimates made to motivate and justify various things throughout the book were, in my opinion, clear and reasonable. Problems are all do-able and a majority of them interesting once the text is understood (which takes some time and energy). Most of the problems have a number or an expression as an answer, it would've been nice to have the answers in the back. Who would it hurt? If a student is willing to spend his/her time and energy until he/she has the right answer they should be given the opportunity to have the 'pleasure of finding things out' (from a title of one of R.Feynman's book). I liked all chapters of the book, but I did feel that Ch.5 is a bit too long. It is an enjoyable and intuitive physics book.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By D. Schlenker on March 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Compared to other Thermo texts I have read, this one is probably the most approachable. Examples are plentiful and the train of thought is quite logical. However, due to the lack of answers to the problems, this book is not useful for self study. Perhaps the author and publisher will "see the light" in 2e.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Alexander Deutch on November 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While a good theoretical understanding can be obtained from this book, the lack of many worked problems in the book and the absence of any solutions in the back presents a real problem for any self-study. You must have a knowledgeable professor who can work out a lot of examples in class. Unfortunately I do not have a good professor, so I've had to pick up other texts to solve my difficulties. I'd avoid this book unless it's absolutely required for a class, and even then I would suggest taking very good notes in class to supplement the book.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By D. Allen on January 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Schroeder sets the mark for readability with this undergraduate physics text. This was my favorite among all my undergraduate texts; by far the easiest to understand and most enjoyable to read. His explanations are clever and witty. I enjoyed his lucid introduction to combinatorics in statistical mechanics. Schroeder gets an A+ in defining abstract ideas such as enthalpy, partition functions, and intensive vs. extensive quantities. On the flip side, the organization is loose, and there aren't enough worked out examples in the latter chapters. I highly recommend this book to professors who want students to actually read and learn from the text.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By John Romkes on January 3, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I'm in my third year of physics, and so far this was probably the book I enjoyed the most. The writing is very good and at times humorous, the build-up of the book is okay, and the explanations are easy to understand and most of the time pretty detailed. Also, the writer does a good job of 'getting inside the student's head'. Plenty of examples, a joy from start to finish. The only disadvantage is that the problems do not have any answers in the back of the book. For the rest, I enjoyed every second of it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ron Marx on February 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
When I enrolled in Thermal Physics in my third year of college and was required by my professor to purchase his textbook on thermal physics, I truly did not realize that his book was one of the most widely used thermal physics books out on the market. I thought he was looking for profit from the students, looking for a way to boost his ego, or perhaps even attempting to justify his class to himself. I am lucky that I was wrong, and the book in its small and light package easily became one of textbooks I can proudly say I read cover to cover. On the first day of class he even stated why he made the book at all, that, dissatisfied with other undergraduate level textbooks, he compiled all of his lecture notes, worked to make them more concise and readable for the average physics student, and created a book that he felt best explained introductory thermal and statistical physics in a way that would be clear to a student with some background in introductory physics. Astonishingly, every single thing he discusses, brings up in the book, or even plots graphically in the text is brought up in class.

To get to the meat of the review, the book is exceptionally clear on the subject, and attempts to give readers a conceptual view on thermal physics. He believes that it's better to understand the subject than simply how to grab an equation and plug in numbers, and the book is designed to do just that, impart a conceptual view of the world of statistical and thermal physics. This is not a textbook that gives you equation after equation to memorize, write down, and plug in numbers without understanding what you are actually working with. This book is designed to show you the world of thermal physics, to walk you through it's strange halls, and to leave you with a more working idea of how this world works.
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