Engineering & Transportation
Rented from RentU
To Rent, select Shipping State from options above
Due Date: Aug 16, 2015
FREE return shipping at the end of the semester. Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with rentals.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35. Overnight, 2 day and International shipping available! Excellent Customer Service.. May not include supplements such as CD, access code or DVD.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $21.76
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Introduction to Thermodynamics, Classical and Statistical, 3rd Edition Hardcover – January 4, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0471614272 ISBN-10: 0471614270 Edition: 3rd

Used
Price: $259.88
Rent
Price: $181.91
6 New from $307.16 26 Used from $144.33
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$307.16 $144.33
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Get Up to 80% Back When You Sell Us Your Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 3 edition (January 4, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471614270
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471614272
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.4 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,461,091 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Solutions Manual available. -- The publisher, John Wiley & Sons

From the Publisher

Presents a comprehensive and rigorous treatment of thermodynamics while retaining an engineering perspective and, in so doing, provides a resource with considerable flexibility for the inclusion of material on thermodynamics. Updated for this Third Edition, it reflects an increased emphasis on environmental issues and a recognition of the steadily growing use of computers in the study of thermodynamics and solution of thermodynamic problems. Contains numerous examples, as well as problems at the end of each chapter that are carefully sequenced to reflect the subject matter.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Leonardo C. Salemi on December 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Ok, lets's face it: "Thermodynamics is just HARD!" That being said, you should look for a good book, if you want to learn the basic principles. What most of the people don't understand is the depth of the first chapters of this book. They are the very basis for what's next. Every enginner I know have used this book, since the 1970's and still counting. It is not a very "easy-beast-to-tame", but once you master the basics everything else will be a consequence. Classics are like that! ; )
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By WAS on March 4, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I continue my engineering practice long after I graduated from college. Originally, I was studying the 1965 edition of Van Wylen & Sonntag, the day that Neil Armstrong made a giant leap for mankind. Later a younger associate of mine had a copy of the 1990 edition of Sonntag & Van Wylen. I particularly liked the inclusion of the Lee-Kesler revision to the BWR equation of state. I proceeded to write a Matlab procedure to determine compressibility for mixtures, using the Lee-Kesler procedure. I have continued to use this Matlab, and later VBasic procedure for over 20 years.

Recently I wanted to determine the enthalpy, entropy and fugacity departures. So I checked Amazon and was delighted that the 1990 edition was still available. It turned out that the 1990 edition cleared up areas that confused me from the 1965 edition. Particularly, I liked the explanation of flow work better, as part of the definition of enthalpy. I now agree that flow work seems to be an accurate description. Also, in passing, I liked the insight of electricity as the flow of an electron gas, and the ability to calculate the electromotive force for a fuel cell, using a Gibbs function. This mechanical connection filled a void in my cause-effect understanding of electricity. So I not only found what I was looking for, I found serendipity in a deeper understanding of my 1965 edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Barman on January 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
As an undergrad I was tortured with Von Wheelan and Sontag in a wash out class. It turned so many young engineers off to Thermo which is shame for the United States. We need every new engineer we can turn out.I had to use this text in college and it was the worst book in four years of study. If you want a long boring explanation of thermodynamics choose this book. I can not in any way recommend this book. See Moran or Ceagel or JP Holman or Paulken or Ka Fu Wong for much better books.

I have recently read Thermo for Dummies and it is probably the best thermo introductory text out there. Dummies is only 339 pages and a very readable explanation of thermo. The examples are very good, practical and clear. For an under grad who has no intro to thermo buy this book hand down.This book will take from being a Dummy to top of your class. Bravo, Professor Pauken well done.

Pauken lacks practice problems but is very clear and readable and the examples more than make up for the lack of problems. I would by Schaum's or equal for the problems and this one for the explanation of thermo.

I also like CRC's Thermo book by Ka Fu Wong. It is more geared for the practicing engineer but an under grad would have little problem understanding it.

I have also read Cengal and Morans books are very good and readable but long.

Let all agree Sontag and Van Wheelen have to go to the rubbish bin and stay there.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By B. Style on December 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I like this book as a reference/review, perhaps as a companion to other subject material. It doesn't have a lot or worked examples and so can't really be thought of as an introductory tutorial. It is very thorough and provides a moderately deep overview of the subject. Undergrad engineering math is a prereq for understanding the book. It is very expensive as a new book; however, in used form I think it is well worth the price (at just a fraction of the new price).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?