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Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics Hardcover – January, 1987

ISBN-13: 978-0030044991 ISBN-10: 0030044995 Edition: 2nd

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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Saunders College Publishing/Harcourt Brace; 2nd edition (January 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030044995
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030044991
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,894,418 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Physics Prelude. Orbits in the Solar System. Orbits Outside the Solar System. Special Relativity. Particles and Forces. Stars. Radiation Processes. Cosmology. Part 1: The Solar System. 1. Celestial Mechanics and the Solar System. 2. The Solar System in Perspective. 3. The Dynamics of the Earth. 4. The Earth - Moon System. 5. The Terrestrial Planets: Mercury, Venus, and Mars. 6. The Jovian Planets. 7. Small Bodies and the Origin of the Solar System. Part 2: The Stars. 8. Electromagnetic Radiation and Matter. 9. Telescopes and Detectors. 10. The Sun: A Model Star. 11. Stars: Distances and Magnitudes. 12. Stars: Binary Systems. 13. Stars: The Hertzsprung - Russell Diagram. Part 3: The Milky Way Galaxy. 14. Our Galaxy: A Preview. 15. The Interstellar Medium and Star Birth. 16. The Evolution of Stars. 17. Star Deaths. 18. Variable and Violent Stars. 19. Galactic Rotation: Stellar Motions. 20. The Evolution of Our Galaxy. Part 4: The Universe. 21. Galaxies Beyond the Milky Way. 22. Hubble's Law and The Distance Scale. 23. Large-Scale Structure in the Universe. 24. Active Galaxies and Quasars. 25. Cosmology: The Big Bang and Beyond. 26. The New Cosmology. Hale-Bopp Comet Update. Appendices. Glossary. --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Don't bother with this book. I used it for an intro-level astro course, along with Frank Shu's Physical Universe. In the exact words of my professor, the only reason we even had to buy this book was because Shu's was written 20 years ago and is slightly out of date.... we used Shu for important concepts and this for basically nothing other than revising what is in Shu with more up-to-date information. This book is kind of expensive to be simply a tool for updating Shu (which, btw, is a great book)... also, the high number of errors and typos really make this book a "don't bother"
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Carey Allen on April 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is not a MEATY text. It is a good INTRODUCTORY text that provides a decent overview of general astronomy, including: basic celestial mechanics, the solar system, absorption/emission, stars, H-R diagram, galaxies, interstellar medium, evolution, Hubble's law, active galaxies, cosmology. The level of detail seems appropriate for a survey course. For example, the authors do a good job of describing basic spectral issues (absorption, emission, line broadening, Boltzmann, the Saha equation, optical depth, etc), but they do not provide a detailed discussion of stellar atmospheres. If you have had an introduction to astronomy and want more depth, then look at Bohm-Vitense's books, Elmgreen's Galaxies & Galactic Structure, etc.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By K B on December 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I used this book in an independent study class in astronomy and astrophysics while I was an undergraduate. With the exception of the some errors in the equations in the opacity section I found this book to be clearly written and not too difficult. You will need to know your college physics and some math but that should be expected since this is not a descriptive text. If you want a descriptive astronomy text search elsewhere, if you want an introductory astrophysics text this is a good choice.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Zeilik & Gregory was the assigned text for my Astrophysics course. Overall, I found the book to be excellent in its presentation of the material and its organization. The authors are able to strike that rare (in physics textbooks) balance between narrative text and derived mathematics. In addition, this book uses the almost universal Meter-Kilogram-Second metric system, rather than the antiquated cemtimeter-gram-second system which is common in astronomy. My only complaint with the book is that it could have had more detailed and clearly written example problems. Even with this minor flaw, it's still an excellent book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 22, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I had to use this book for a year. It's badly written with numerous errors and typos. Equations are written in a non-user-friendly format. Difficult concepts are not very well explained. Practice problems are sometimes very ambiguous. My professor even said this isn't the best book in the world. The only good thing about it is that it's directed toward a first-year astronomy audience. But it's worth it to buy a slightly harder book and understand it better. If you need it for a class, I guess you're stuck! But there are better books out there. Try "An Introduction to Modern Astrphysics" by Carroll and Ostile.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is a good compromise between the less analytical texts and some of the books geared toward astonomy majors. It is not a great book but I felt it was up to date and comprehensive. One note though, the authors assume you have a good grounding in undergrad math and physics. On several occasions I had to pull out one of my math or physics texts to review a subject so I could understand the material being presented.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book was the textbook for my introductory Astronomy course and we found than many of the constants were inconsistent in different sections and/or inaccurate. One specific example, the radius of earth in the appendix has the last two numbers reversed. There are numerous others.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Duvernois TOP 1000 REVIEWER on February 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Obviously Physical Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy (Series of Books in Astronomy) is the standard by which all introductory astronomy books must be measured. This book is more expensive, less clear, has more typos and even glaring errors. But it's newer, and more "up to date." I'd explain to the students that we're going to use an old book and I'd fill in newer research as needed as we go along. It's not as if there are fundamental changes to how stars work, Galaxies form, or how telescopes work. (Especially not at an introductory level.)
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