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Invasive Pythons in the United States: Ecology of an Introduced Predator (Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book) Paperback – October 1, 2011


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Invasive Pythons in the United States: Ecology of an Introduced Predator (Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book) + Snake in the Grass: An Everglades Invasion
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Product Details

  • Series: Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: A Wormsloe Foundation Nature Book (October 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820338354
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820338354
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 7.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #710,092 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Invasive Pythons in the United States: Ecology of an Introduced Predator might be the title of a great new horror film instead of the well-researched, professional yet entertaining book that it is."—Whit Gibbons, Aiken Standard


"This meticulously researched and profusely illustrated work shines a spotlight on the dangers caused by introduction of non-native pythons into South Florida while providing a comprehensive account of what we know about the ecology of Burmese pythons, both in the United States and in their native range. This book will be of considerable interest to a wide range of readers including scholars, researchers, outdoors people, wildlife enthusiasts, and those concerned about the environmental and human threats posed by this invasive species in the United States."—Russell A. Mittermeier, President, Conservation International, and Vice President, IUCN


"Invasive species come in all shapes and sizes—but few biological invaders are as dramatic as giant pythons. In this magnificently illustrated book, two accomplished snake biologists separate fact from fiction, and provide a user-friendly but scientifically rigorous account of how the pythons got to the USA, what we know about these troublesome aliens, and what impacts they are likely to have on the complex ecosystems of the Everglades and beyond."—Rick Shine, University of Sydney


"The amount of misinformation and hysteria surrounding the discovery of viable populations of large pythons has been mind-boggling. This text provides a serious, scientifically-valid overview of an important ecological problem and will be a welcome addition to the bookshelf of scientists and non-scientists alike."—Richard Seigel, Professor and Chair, Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University


“Michael E. Dorcas and John D. Willson provide a much-needed examination of the growing impact of Burmese pythons as an invasive species in the United States. By highlighting the many dangers and detrimental effects the introduction of non-native pythons has caused in the Everglades, this book documents the mounting threat which invasives pose to ecosystems everywhere. The first book to focus solely on this issue, Invasive Pythons is well-researched, well-illustrated, and well-timed.”—Edward O. Wilson, University Research Professor, Harvard University


"If we needed another cautionary tale of the damage to Florida's ecosystem the introduction of exotic species can cause, this work should persuade any skeptic on the issue."—Tom Palmer, The Ledger


“Accomplished ophidian authorities Dorcas and Wilson have produced an exceptionally well-illustrated, highly informative, very readable book on introduced pythons currently existing as established populations in Florida. . . .The narrative is not only factual but also highly entertaining.”—Choice

About the Author

Michael E. Dorcas is a professor of biology at Davidson College. He is the author of six previous books including, with coauthor Whit Gibbons, Snakes of the Southeast and Frogs and Toads of the Southeast (both Georgia). John D. Willson is a postdoctoral research associate at Virginia Polytechnic and State University. He has published exten­sively on snake ecology and serves as a section editor for Snake Natural History notes in the journal Herpetological Review.


More About the Author

Michael E. Dorcas, Ph.D.
Short Biographical Sketch - 2013

Mike Dorcas is a Professor in the Department of Biology at Davidson College, Davidson, NC. He received a B.S. (1986) and M.S. (1990) from the University of Texas at Arlington and a Ph.D. from Idaho State University in 1995. Mike is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received numerous awards, including the Senior Research Award from the Association of Southeastern Biologists and the Meritorious Teaching Award at the World Congress of Herpetology Biologists in 2012. Mike's research program focuses on the ecology, physiology, and conservation of amphibians and reptiles. His research program is interdisciplinary in nature and relies heavily on collaboration with students. Mike has published numerous book chapters and over 100 articles on the biology of amphibians and reptiles, many of which include students as coauthors. He is involved in numerous research projects including studies of invasive Burmese pythons in Florida and the ecology and conservation of diamondback terrapins in South Carolina. Much of his research in the Davidson area focuses on the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles. He frequently gives talks about his research to the public and in academic settings. He has published seven books, including Invasive Pythons in the United States with JD Willson and Snakes of the Southeast with Whit Gibbons.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 9 people found the following review helpful By tonymills on December 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book chronicles the amazing ecological introduction of giant predator snakes into the United States: the spread of introduced pythons across the southern portion of the sunshine state. Dorcas and Willson use current, scientifically sound information and great color photos to tell the story of these giant snakes and the potential impact they could have on the ecology of South Florida.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cleaning frenzy on May 28, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We love this book! It was well-written and provides an excellent overview of problems related to introduced species and background on invasive Burmese pythons in Florida. The people who originally illegally released this species in the Everglades should be ashamed of themselves! Sick people!!
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15 of 25 people found the following review helpful By LGray on January 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is filled with false "facts" and assumptions. Entertaining? Possibly. But, certainly not "scientific" or accurate. If you want to know why, read this article written by the Barkers.
[...]
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Truman Goldendog on November 27, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent popular account of the problem of invasive pythons in Florida. It does a great job of providing informant on these animals and their effects on the native species in the Sunshine State. The photos and maps are well done. It should be read by government officials, and also politicians. Former Secreatry of Interior Bruce Babbitt said that invasive species are the greatest threat to native ecosystems and he was right.
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3 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on July 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Invasive pythons of ONE species SOMEWHERE in southern FLORIDA???

That's obviously a clear and present danger!!!

I believe the UN Security Council should pass a resolution on this matter. If the Russians, the Chinese and the French veto the reasonable US proposals, USAF should take unilateral action. Napalm, perhaps?

Or...we could simply put the whole thing in perspective. I mean, we're talking about the South here, a veritable haven for alligators, killer bees, fire ants and Dixiecrats. A few invasive pythons eating feral cats in the Everglades aren't going to make much difference. It's payback time, Tibbles!

For these reasons, Madame Chairperson, the Burmese delegate to the Security Council will vote "no" to resolution 666.
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