Invisible Capital and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.90 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Invisible Capital: How Un... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Invisible Capital: How Unseen Forces Shape Entrepreneurial Opportunity Paperback – November 2, 2010


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.05
$7.09 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$13.05 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Invisible Capital: How Unseen Forces Shape Entrepreneurial Opportunity + The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations, and the Public
Price for both: $28.18

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers (November 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605093076
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605093079
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #845,466 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A native of Chicago, Chris Rabb is a visiting researcher at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and is a fellow at Demos, a non-partisan think-tank in New York City.


More About the Author

Chris Rabb is a writer, consultant and speaker on the intersection of entrepreneurship, politics, media and social identity.

A native of Chicago, he is currently a visiting researcher at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and fellow at Demos, a national nonpartisan advocacy and research center based in New York City.

Mr. Rabb is an alumnus of Yale College and a recipient of a M.S. in Organizational Dynamics from the University of Pennsylvania. He has worked in the U.S. Senate, the White House Conference on Small Business, and has run a technology-based product design firm and nationally recognized business incubator.

A 2001 awardee of the German Marshall Fund's American Marshall Memorial Fellowship, he is also a Sense-Making Fellow with the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Mr. Rabb is also a member of the executive ensemble of ImprovEdge, an innovative firm that blends improvisational comedy with professional facilitation for corporate and other large-scale clients. As a former stand-up comedian and long-time improvisational performer, this work combines several of his varied skill sets and training for an array of beneficiaries.

Mr. Rabb lives in Philadelphia where he is an active member of the Mt. Airy community. He is an avid genealogist and active father of two young sons.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.ChrisRabb.com

and

http://www.InvisibleCapital.com

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Mr. Rabb's book is a must read for anyone who is serious about getting started in business.
Darrell W. Pone
In truth, this book helps prepare the entrepreneur by exposing the real landscape behind the entrepreneurial journey.
G. Davis
I have read it twice and it has pretty much changed a lot of perspectives I have always had.
Crome

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Icyone on December 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
I was attracted to this book after hearing the author on a radio interview. For the first time, I heard conclusion after conclusion about entrepreneurship and small business that I myself have long believed but had not been able to articulate -- along with many facts and figures to support those views.

In my family I can trace a history of business ownership and entrepreneurship back over 200 years. My generation were the first to spend our lives as "non-entrepreneurs". I have long concluded that the American secular religion of "small business" and "entrepreneurship" is misplaced and based upon misunderstanding and distortion of fact -- and that in many cases the seductive imperative to "be your own boss" and "own your own business", along with the deliberate falsehoods in the political arena that "small businesses create the most jobs" ignores the reality that most small businesses fail, after failing to ever generate a profit. (So when small businesses fail, what happens to all those jobs that were "created"???)

What most small businesses actually amount to is self-employment -- frequently in the absence of paying jobs, and/or a huge suck-off of hard earned savings -- or perhaps a small windfall or inheritance -- from naive individuals who have neither knowledge nor aptitude for actually starting a successful business. Rather than an engine for growth, unsound attempts a entrepreneurship are often a machine for wealth extraction for the naive and unprepared.

If these comments either intrigue or infuriate you, let me recommend this book to your attention!! Entrepreneurship is commendable and an important part of our society, but it demands an understanding of the risks and requirements. Be prepared!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Crome on October 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
I'm a student interested in social entrepreneurship so I decided to check Invisible Capital. This book was beyond informative! Chris Rabb basically spelled out everything that no one is willing to say about the real nature of entrepreneurship! I have read it twice and it has pretty much changed a lot of perspectives I have always had. I really appreciate the points he brought up about how most people always think it's about hard work and dedication, but down play the real reasons why successful entrepreneurs are able to separate themselves from the majority who fail. After Rabb reframes common misconceptions about entrepreneurship, small busineso ses, and opportunity, he challenges what we think of as "successful" and lays out new definitions and routes of success that reach far beyond profit margins and into our communities and nation as a whole. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who is striving to be an entrepreneur.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. Davis on January 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book provides information, statistics and an honest discussion around the uneven playing field surrounding entrepreneurial opportunities. It is an important read for potential entrepreneurs, community leaders and elected officials truly interested in how to increase economic development on Main Street. The chapter on Reframing Entrepreneurial Success...and Failure is a game changer. The author has exposed more of the challenges behind the American Dream without dampening the spirit of the Entrepreneur. In truth, this book helps prepare the entrepreneur by exposing the real landscape behind the entrepreneurial journey.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ed Hopkins on February 19, 2011
Format: Paperback
Chris categorizes various forms of financial capital, social capital, cultural capital, and human capital as "invisible capital." He explains why and how people who inherit or luck upon wealthy, prestigious, or powerful families or friends have much easier paths to successful entrepreneurship, all other things remaining equal, than their equally talented, intelligent, industrious, and ambitious peers whose family members or friends can't afford to invest in their ventures, can't afford to pay for their private schools or university tuitions, can't guarantee safety nets will be there if they fail, don't know much about business or law, and don't know many people of influence. In essence, the more invisible capital someone has, the lower his or her barrier to entry to entrepreneurial competitions. Learning more about all the various ways invisible capital influences entrepreneurial competition and all the social science that supports Chris's sociological arguments made this book worth more than a quick skim. This book deserves to be perused.

Entrepreneurs who had to build up our financial capital, cultural capital, and social capital as well as our human capital before we could compete successfully against entrepreneurs who inherited or lucked upon a lot of invisible capital are sure to grasp Chris's argument immediately. Proponents of meritocratic entrepreneurial competition will feel like members of the choir while reading this book. It is a very important contribution. Additionally, it will strengthen arguments I commonly make while having dinner with my professional friends. Now, instead of trying to explain all the hidden and unearned competitive advantages that most of the most successful U.S.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Hinds on October 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
This was a really insightful book. Chris Rabb makes a compelling argument on why it is so important
for you to take stock of the assets that you have going for you and to leverage them to your benefit in business. Most people tend to overlook those assets in their pursuit of entrepreneurial success. Unfortunately, not taking this step increases the likelihood that your business will 'fail'.

I put 'fail' in quotes because the author used some great examples of how some businesses that looked like 'failures' on the surface were actually a success. He also compelled the reader to expand the definition of success to include more than big houses and fancy cars. Your business should also have social value too.

The author also discussed the political landscape and how it impacts business and the economy. He shatters some commonly held beliefs about economic stimulus and the meaning of small business. Mr. Rabb provides a unique perspective having worked in Washington as an aide and coming from a lineage of entrepreneurs.

Chris Rabb provides a refreshing dose of reality coupled with a belief that ANYONE can think and act like an entrepreneur.
Mr. Rabb agreed with Malcolm Gladwell when he said that the entrepreneur's advantage is primarily ANALYTICAL-he is better at figuring out a sure thing than the rest of us. Most self-help literature would have you believe that the entrepreneur's primary advantage is TEMPERAMENT-- she is braver than the rest of us.

I actually think it's a combination of both because in a recent Forbes Interview with Jay Z, Warren Buffett talked about 'emotional stability' being a key ingredient in his success as an investor. But what really made the difference was he had a head start by having a father who was an investor.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews