Your Music Library
  MP3 cart

Invisible Empire // Crescent Moon

August 6, 2013

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music
"Please retry"
$11.49
$11.49
More options
  • Sample this album Title (Sample)
1
30
3:53
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
2
30
4:11
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
3
30
4:11
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
4
30
3:41
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
5
30
3:12
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
6
30
3:12
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
7
30
3:52
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
8
30
4:29
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
9
30
4:11
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
10
30
3:37
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
11
30
3:22
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
12
30
5:27
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
13
30
3:50
Play in Library $1.29 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 6, 2013
  • Release Date: August 6, 2013
  • Label: Blue Note
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 Jaydone Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 51:08
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00E5SCOS4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,301 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Very different feel from previous KT work.
RJM
KT was able to write both lyrics and music though that work in harmony to convey the same message--same tone--same feeling.
Madeline
I'm so happy that she's back and I hope to hear much more from her for years to come, because this album blew my mind.
daniel sittig

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Madeline on August 6, 2013
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Unfortunately for many artists, quite often the best art comes out of very painful life events. In the space between KT's last album and this release, her father died and she divorced her husband. It's clear that KT has channeled whatever clarity she has gained regarding mortality and heartache into this album. Musically it strips much of the production of her last album out, which leaves just KT and her guitar with minimal touches of other instruments. It's reflexive, meditative, and melancholic, yet not without moments of hope.

This album though probably her best, will also probably do the worst commercially. It's exchanging of big radio singles for bare instrumentation is a brave artistic choice, which I believe pays off in the end for the listener. The real power of this album is KT's pairing of her words with her music. Often, it seems skilled lyricists simply come up with music just because they have to--and it only serves to showcase the lyrics. And then the majority of radio singles disregard lyrics all together, and the focus is on the feeling of the music. KT was able to write both lyrics and music though that work in harmony to convey the same message--same tone--same feeling. I do recommend listening to this album only when you have time to really listen to it. The nuances will likely be lost in a hurried rush through, it needs focused attention to be appreciated.

"Made of Glass" a song she wrote after the death of a dear friend, is an album standout. Understated and fragile, it's clear that KT has been grappling with thoughts of the afterlife for some time. Her father had Parkinson's for about two years before dying in a bike accident, and unsurprisingly mortality and how this relates to how we live our lives is a big theme of this album.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Lance Lazewski on August 8, 2013
Format: Audio CD
Don't get me wrong. I think KT is a GREAT musician, vocalist & songwriter. One of the most talented around today. I love "Eye to the Telescope", "Drastic Fantastic" & "Acoustic Extravaganza". Her last release, "Tiger Suit", was OK but I thought she may have been losing her way a bit. Now, after a couple years off from recording, she comes out with this almost totally acoustic, ultra mellow album. Like one of the previous reviewers, I miss KT's catchy, up-tempo melodies, which are non-existent on this release. I purchased this as an import last month because I was going through "KT Tunstall withdrawal" and couldn't wait for the U.S. release. I'll give it a few more listens, especially since the vast majority of other reviewers seem to really like this approach. It comes down to personal taste. Her voice & playing is superb as always, but I like my KT on the more energetic side.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lurchie on August 8, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've been following KT Tunstall since Black Horse and the Cherry Tree made it's debut, and to be honest, that rhythmic upbeat tempo was what I liked so much about her music for the longest time. I have recently started paying much closer attention to her slower, more introspective songs and have been amazed at what I'm hearing. IE / CM is an entire album of introspective, mellow tunes. This album is a must listen with headphones because there are a LOT of subtleties that would be easy to miss otherwise. I have been listening to it at work - it's great work music because it is stimulating, but not distracting. The way she layers her vocals (and vocalizations) is fascinating. This would be a great album to listen to on headphones with the lights turned off and a few candles burning. Yeah, I know. That sounds kind of hippy dippy, but this album is mesmerizing. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Smitt-jeppesen on September 2, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm a great fan of K.T. Tunstall, have seen her live, loved her previous albums and was looking forward to the new release. This one, however, is much lower tempo and lacks much of the verve of the others. I have really tried to like it but after more than 3 passes, I just can't get excited about it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By purplemiller on August 16, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
"Invisible Empire/Crescent Moon" is KT Tunstall's "Nebraska": a noble effort to step back from commercial expectations and to follow her muse to places that her previous work seems to have flown over. (The fact that she's performing "State Trooper" in a number of her live shows would suggest that Springsteen was indeed something of an influence here.) The complaints that there are no "Black Horse"/"Fade Like a Shadow" tubthumpers here are reminiscent of, if less enraged than, responses to Bruce's step away from what made him Bruuuuuuuuce -- and equally miss the point.

While many of the songs on IE/CM are more introspective than Tunstall's pop-oriented work, they are not that far removed from earlier work like "Under the Weather" or "Funnyman" (which she's also performing on tour). And it's equally plausible to imagine those songs being part of the airy, stripped-back sound of this album. Some of the work here -- "Invisible Empire," "Feel It All," "Carried," "Chimes" -- are among the best tunes she's ever done.

Those songs also work well because Howie Gelb's production augments them perfectly. The problems with the album come with Gelb's overtinkering in his efforts to create a sonic space in which Tunstall's voice and guitar stand out. The reverb and slide guitar employed on occasion gives some of the cuts a David-Lynchian feel, which would be fine if this were "Inland Empire/Twin Peaks Moon," but that's not what she's doing here. And the decision to bring in a clarinet on the otherwise lovely "Crescent Moon" turns that song into background music for a PBS cartoon. (Same is true of "Honeydew," although that's not as strong a cut otherwise.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?