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Inviting God In: Celebrating the Soul-Meaning of the Jewish Holy Days Hardcover – August 22, 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Trumpeter (August 22, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590303377
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590303375
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.8 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #415,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Aaron, a teacher of mysticism in Jerusalem, focuses on one word not usually used to describe Jewish holiday themes and observances: love. Yes, he says, Rosh Hashanah is about accountability and Hanukkah is about hope. Yes, Yom Kippur is about forgiveness and Purim is about trust. But every holiday shares one unifying ingredient not usually stirred into the Jewish recipe for the holidays: God's love. A Jewish holiday, called a mo'ed, a fixed time or date, allows us a "date with God" so that we can remember a dramatic moment in God's loving presence. Each chapter describes the "soul-meaning"—a term Aaron doesn't define—of a different holiday, an aspect of God's unconditional love. Aaron's accessible explanations make difficult mystical concepts easy to understand, especially when he offers clever, offbeat analogies. The Torah is like a love letter you read and reread. Revelation is like the traffic report on the radio, with God as the traffic helicopter deciphering patterns from above. The tragedy, says Aaron, is that today many of us are not even looking for God. For those who are, Aaron's book will provide sincere guidance toward uncovering a tender, untarnished meaning of the Jewish holidays. (Aug. 8)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Aaron's book provides sincere guidance toward uncovering a tender, untarnished meaning of the Jewish holidays."—Publishers Weekly

"A spiritually rousing book. . . . In a warm, easy-to-read style, and radiating an enthusiasm that is contagious, Aaron explores the deeper meaning behind nine Jewish holidays."—Cleveland Jewish News

"This is a wonderfully inspiring book! Rabbi Aaron makes you fall in love with God and wtih the depth and wisdom of Judaism."—Dr. Miriam Adahan, author of You are a Jewel

"The Jewish holidays are not only profoundly deep but spiritually thrilling. If you are looking to discover the rich, inspirational tapestry of the holiday cycle, then Rabbi David Aaron is the teacher for you."—Shimon Apisdorf, cofounder of the Jewish Literacy Fund

"Contemporary, meaningful, and witty. Inviting God In is an excellent spiritual tour and guide through the Jewish year."—Rabbi Nissan Dovid Dubov, author of  The Key to Kabbalah: Discovering Jewish Mysticism


"Inviting God In has a lot to teach all of us, about God and about ourselves."—Rabbi Joseph Telushkin

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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This short little book packs a lot of punch for its size.
Anyechka
We begin to understand God's love for us, His infinite compassion and kindness and His own unique ability to forgive us, despite our sins.
BklynGal54
Whether the reader has little Jewish background or a lot, he will gain a new and deeper appreciation for these days.
Goldy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BklynGal54 on October 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Rabbi David Aaron takes us on a soulful, intensely spiritual journey of the Jewish calendar year in this well written and finely crafted book. From Passover to Rosh HaShanah to Purim, this book explains the multi-faceted nature of God's role in our lives, both on a highly personal level and on a collective one as well.

We begin to understand God's love for us, His infinite compassion and kindness and His own unique ability to forgive us, despite our sins.

Rabbi Aaron does not write in a didactic or preachy fashion, but rather his style is a most refreshing one as he unravels spiritual mysteries with much simplicity while including personal stories that make this subject feel so real and tangible to the reader.

This book implores the reader to connect with God, to understand what our relationship with God is and how we can benefit from it. On each holiday we are taught what role God plays and what is expected of us. Leading a life that is devoid of God's presence and a spiritually bankrupt one, robs us of not only a genuine understanding of our great heritage, but of a unique and cherished bond that has sustained us as people and a nation.

There is a story told of a great Chassidic rabbi named the Kotzker Rebbe who lived in Europe in the 1800s. A child was once walking down the street. The Kotzker Rebbe passed by and motioned for him to stop. "Let me ask you a question, little boy," said the Kotzker Rebbe. "Where is G-d?" The youngster smiled. "Oh, that's easy," he replied. "G-d is everywhere." The Kotzker Rebbe looked at the boy for a moment. "No, my son," he answered gently. "G-d is only where you allow Him to enter."

Our holiday observance can only become more profound and meaningful by adopting a policy of inviting God into our hearts and homes. Rabbi Aaron's book will be a tremendous addition to our libraries as well as a significant contribution to the corpus of Jewish spiritual literature.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anyechka on April 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This short little book packs a lot of punch for its size. It never overwhelms the reader with preachiness, overly flowery language, or stiff boring academic prose. Instead it delivers neat compact messages that are deeply moving, inspirational, and thought-provoking. Rabbi Aaron starts with Pesach, since it occurs in the month of Nisan, which is supposed to be the real calendar beginning of the year, even though most people think of Tishrei and Rosh Hashanah as starting the Jewish year. He goes through all of the major holidays and fast days in chronological order (Pesach, Shavuot, Tisha B'Av, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Simchat Torah, Hanukah, Tu B'Sh'vat, and Purim), and ends with a recap of all of these spiritual lessons. He assigns each holiday or fast day a theme relating to God and love, such as celebrating loss and sadness on Tisha B'Av, celebrating pleasure on Tu B'Sh'vat, celebrating unconditional love on Pesach, and celebrating accountability on Rosh Hashanah. Through these eye-opening lessons, he gives the reader the impetus to break out of boxes and old paradigms of looking at God, the holidays, the Torah, and the world. Although many Jews tend to shun the notion of having a personal relationship with God as being a Christian concept and not something rooted in their faith tradition, that's a very mistaken belief. We might not use the same language or examples to talk about it, and might not view it in the same way, but as Rabbi Aaron so beautifully illustrates, it's a very Jewish concept indeed. And though all of these themes he discusses are different, in the end, he points out, they're all centered around the concept of reciprocal and unconditional love, love of God, love of one another, and God's love for us. It becomes a lot easier to invite God in on these holidays and major fast days when one understands that all one needs is love.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Bruk on November 16, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Amazing book.

Rav David Aaron - is a master to put key concepts in the clear form.

I'm a kabbala teacher - use his books for my students.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rabbi David Aaron is a non-dualistic, panentheistic Jew --- this is the belief that the world is part, though not all of God. This notion is reflected in all of his writings.

His most common metaphor of the individual human connection with God is God as the sun and people and reality as its rays. We are not the sun, but we are also not detached from the sun.

In such a view, God is the root of all existence. Or stated in more extreme terms, everything shares some vital essence with God, and therefore, everything is God.

In Inviting God In, Rabbi Aaron examines the Jewish holidays in light of this view. He has some interesting things to say about some standard notions.

He equates Rosh Hashanah with the idea of monotheism --- one God who sits in judgment of the world and separate from the world. Yom Kippur is the day when God presents God's true nature, the panentheistic view.

Rabbi Aaron also gives special importance to Purim, which he connects with Yom Kippur. Purim is a minor holiday, dismissed by most as a children's holiday, but for Aaron, it is a taste of the World to Come, when distinctions between good and evil, right and wrong, will melt away, and we will all see ourselves as we truly are, a part of God.

Inviting God In is by turns hokey and profound, which is Rabbi Aaron's style. But there is much good to glean from his teachings. A view of the world, God and people that is both attractive and hits a poetic chord in the heart.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Rabbi David Aaron is a spiritual teacher who has invested over 3 decades delving into life's BIGGEST question marks and sharing his life-changing wisdom and insights to adults and young adults. He has emerged as the 'God expert' simply because he has dared to ask and answer the most difficult questions that he/ALL people have and/or struggle with about God's existence and their own. And while the name 'God' appears on the cover of almost all his books, he doesn't believe in 'God' - not in the popular sense of that word, which leaves the Divine entirely misunderstood.

Rabbi Aaron delivers The WHY. The big AHA. The ! The '3rd Step' (out of 12).

He draws everything from Torah. His teachings are SIMPLE to understand and deliver unprecedented CLARITY to people of all backgrounds and faiths.

His 5 'masteries':
1) Decoding Life's Biggest Mysteries
2) Inspiring God Consciousness
3) Soul-Powered Living
4) Living on Purpose
5) Transformational Torah Wisdom

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO SPIRITUAL CONSCIOUSNESS... read books by Rabbi David Aaron and visit http://TheOne.tv for articles, videos, webinars and more.

What's UNIQUE about what Rabbi Aaron does
In today's glutted market of new age spirituality/self-help/self-fulfillment and spiritual leaders/gurus, there's a myriad of religions, sects and pathways on the shelf. BUT, the majority of the world has absolutely no idea what Torah IS, even though it possesses the most universally-embraceable spiritual content on the planet. NO ONE is disseminating Torah's universal message. And NO ONE is communicating it in a way that can connect to the spirituality-seeking 21st century.

Rabbi Aaron's vision is to create a new worldwide spiritual awareness based on Torah secrets. The 'north star' is 'world transformation thru global God consciousness.'

Why...
Getting simple and clear answers to life's most essential questions is transformational, life altering & empowering. Sharing this clarity will improve and make a better, loving world for everyone.

LAUGH YOUR WAY TO SPIRITUAL CONSCIOUSNESS... read books by Rabbi David Aaron and visit http://TheOne.tv for articles, videos, webinars and more.

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