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Ion (Bryn Mawr Commentaries, Greek) Paperback – December 1, 1984

ISBN-13: 978-0929524276 ISBN-10: 0929524276 Edition: Second Edition,2

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Product Details

  • Series: Bryn Mawr Commentaries, Greek
  • Paperback: 38 pages
  • Publisher: Bryn Mawr Commentaries, Inc.; Second Edition,2 edition (December 1, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0929524276
  • ISBN-13: 978-0929524276
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,530,373 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Andrew M Miller

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very useful to understand words and phrases easily.
and very helpful to confirm about the particles and the grammar in Greek Particles and Greek Grammar.
Thank you.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The supplemental notes are great, but a working vocabulary list would have been a great addition to this book, unfortunately most Ion commentaries don't provide one either.
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By Andrew Schaeffer on August 31, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
this is a good book to translate. just make sure you have a dictionary too.
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2 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. Schwartz on February 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
.
In ION, Socrates says ION, a reciter of Homer, is not an artist but argues that his skill is that which is inspired by a larger source. That he is not an artist, but rather conveying the source as a magnet strings along a series of conductors, a chain of rings, so to speak, from the divine to the inspired ION to the audience that is moved by his recitals of Homer. And that ION's recital of Homer is just a carrier of such divine inspiration, transmitter of force, that he can not know more about driving than a true charioteer, or fishing than a true fisherman and medicine than a true doctor, the characters he depicts in his recitals.

My first argument was that Socrates appears to miss in his inquiry, is the idea that ION is an artist, or as Nietzsche and Max Weber have illustrated, a value-producer and self-creator. He may not have the art of the fisherman, the doctor and the charioteer, which he so vividly depicts, but he does have his own perception and imagination coupled with his own ability to both self-create and act. Inspired yes, yet the creation of his realty. All humans filter realty and project their own image, either from a collective consciousness or that of their own individual autonomous self, however such value producing autonomy remains to those with such amazing and profound ability, as Christ, Krishna, Buddha and so forth. ION therefore is not depicting a true doctor, fisherman, nor the literal and actual essence of Homer's Illiad and Odyssey, but he is creating from himself something new. He is a producer, a creator in using his imagination, his acting skills.

Yet for Socrates, he is only a magnetic conductor of divinely inspired source information. And he may be right.
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