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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The final fight, the last gasp, but how I wish it weren't! This deserves an Oscar!
IP MAN: THE FINAL FIGHT (Orig. title "Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin" ("IP MAN: THE MASTER'S FINALE"), a/k/a IP MAN 4, a/k/a IP MAN 4: THE FINAL FIGHT, Dir. Herman Yau, 2013, 102 minutes, Cantonese with English subtitles). ~ Firstly, please note this film is a remake of Ip Man 2 but don't allow that to put you off ... please!

When I first reviewed this excellent...
Published 13 months ago by E. Hernandez

versus
56 of 58 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Gentle Biopic About Yip Man's Twilight Years, Not An Action Extravaganza
The interest in Ip Man films seems to still be going strong as yet another adaptation looks at the life of legendary martial arts Grandmaster Yip Man. It's starting to get a little confusing, however, with two different series covering similar ground.

First there are the films directed by Wilson Yip and starring Donnie Yen as Yip Man:
1) Ip Man (2008)...
Published 13 months ago by K. Harris


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56 of 58 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Gentle Biopic About Yip Man's Twilight Years, Not An Action Extravaganza, September 14, 2013
The interest in Ip Man films seems to still be going strong as yet another adaptation looks at the life of legendary martial arts Grandmaster Yip Man. It's starting to get a little confusing, however, with two different series covering similar ground.

First there are the films directed by Wilson Yip and starring Donnie Yen as Yip Man:
1) Ip Man (2008)
2) Ip Man 2: Legend of the Grandmaster (2010)
3) Ip Man 3 (proposed): Yet to be made, this effort has been announced in pre-production status with Edmond Wong taking the reins as the writer and director.

And then there are the films by director Herman Yau (of which this is the second):
1) The Legend is Born: Ip Man (2010)
2) Ip Man: The Final Fight (2013)

With "Ip Man: The Final Fight," we examine the twilight years of Yip Man's life. Covering some of the same time period as "Ip Man 2: The Legend of the Grandmaster," the film starts in 1949 as the Grandmaster travels to Hong Kong and leaves his life in Foshan. He sets up a rather humble establishment, teaching students the art of Wing Chun on the rooftop of a local business. His students are a varied lot and include a police man, a prison guard, a union leader, and a waitress among others. The students become very loyal to their teacher and form an extended family of sorts. Through the years, the interpersonal dynamics of the group will change but they are all united under their leader. The film examines these peripheral lives, but also features some family biographical information about Yip Man as well including his wife's last visit to Hong Kong, reuniting with his son later in life, and a late life flirtation with a much younger woman. For the few action sequences, the school battles a rival establishment (which is surprisingly silly) and they must also face down an infamous crime lord.

I'm not sure exactly what type of picture "Ip Man: The Final Fight" wants to be. In many ways, it is a gently nostalgic character piece. While other pictures that have chronicled the life of Yip Man have been more based in action and extravagance (this is even much mellower than Yau's earlier film), this aims to be more biographical. After the initial set-up, the years start gliding by with rapidity. Although I liked the movie, I don't know that it was particularly successful overall. Anthony Wong is convincing and appealing as the aging Yip Man. I, however, was never particularly sold on the supporting cast. We never get to know them with much depth and that is a problem in a movie that seeks to be a character study. There are some nice moments throughout, to be sure, but I never felt very close to the heart of this movie. And when action elements were added in, it occasionally seemed awkward.

Most of the movie showed hints of Wing Chun, but the movie really has only two extended fight sequences. In the first, the school goes to battle with a rival establishment. The confrontation is so corny, though, it might have come out of "Happy Days" with its unconvincing dialogue and tough guy posturing. The battle with the crime lord and his minions is staged better, but still boils down to a simplistic and over-the-top "good versus evil" showdown. What's worse, though, it never really makes sense with the rest of the movie. It's as if the director thought, "I have to give them at least one big action moment" whether it fit into the gentle tone of the movie or not. In the end, "Ip Man: The Final Fight" wants to be too many things to too many people. If it had developed its supporting characters, it might have made a strong drama. As is, it's fine without being particularly distinguished. KGHarris, 9/13.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Anthony Wong can't save this Ip Man, July 20, 2013
By 
C. Kuhn (Longmont, CO USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ip Man Final Fight (DVD)
After hearing that the legendary Anthony Wong would be playing the Wing Chun master in this latest installment of the Ip Man saga certainly got my attention. Sadly this dvd lacks anything to be excited about. The subtitles are very bad, at times completely out of sync and incorrect. The music sounds like it was taken from a low budget Hollywood musical and the overly choreographed fight scenes have the same sound effects as the old Bruce Lee movies where someone is hitting a Naugahyde couch with a bat. The editing is crude and seemingly random, and there is little to no continuity to the story. Anthony Wong is always great and he has Ip Man's characteristics down, but his subtleties are overshadowed by the poor direction of this film. Herman Yau has directed some great films and he turned the world on to Anthony Wong, but here in Ip Man The Final Fight he seems to have rushed this production terribly and forgotten how to make another Wong classic.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Gentle Biopic About Yip Man's Twilight Years, Not An Action Extravaganza, September 13, 2013
The interest in Ip Man films seems to still be going strong as yet another adaptation looks at the life of legendary martial arts Grandmaster Yip Man. It's starting to get a little confusing, however, with two different series covering similar ground.

First there are the films directed by Wilson Yip and starring Donnie Yen as Yip Man:
1) Ip Man (2008)
2) Ip Man 2: Legend of the Grandmaster (2010)
3) Ip Man 3 (proposed): Yet to be made, this effort has been announced in pre-production status with Edmond Wong taking the reins as the writer and director.

And then there are the films by director Herman Yau (of which this is the second):
1) The Legend is Born: Ip Man (2010)
2) Ip Man: The Final Fight (2013)

With "Ip Man: The Final Fight," we examine the twilight years of Yip Man's life. Covering some of the same time period as "Ip Man 2: The Legend of the Grandmaster," the film starts in 1949 as the Grandmaster travels to Hong Kong and leaves his life in Foshan. He sets up a rather humble establishment, teaching students the art of Wing Chun on the rooftop of a local business. His students are a varied lot and include a police man, a prison guard, a union leader, and a waitress among others. The students become very loyal to their teacher and form an extended family of sorts. Through the years, the interpersonal dynamics of the group will change but they are all united under their leader. The film examines these peripheral lives, but also features some family biographical information about Yip Man as well including his wife's last visit to Hong Kong, reuniting with his son later in life, and a late life flirtation with a much younger woman. For the few action sequences, the school battles a rival establishment (which is surprisingly silly) and they must also face down an infamous crime lord.

I'm not sure exactly what type of picture "Ip Man: The Final Fight" wants to be. In many ways, it is a gently nostalgic character piece. While other pictures that have chronicled the life of Yip Man have been more based in action and extravagance (this is even much mellower than Yau's earlier film), this aims to be more biographical. After the initial set-up, the years start gliding by with rapidity. Although I liked the movie, I don't know that it was particularly successful overall. Anthony Wong is convincing and appealing as the aging Yip Man. I, however, was never particularly sold on the supporting cast. We never get to know them with much depth and that is a problem in a movie that seeks to be a character study. There are some nice moments throughout, to be sure, but I never felt very close to the heart of this movie. And when action elements were added in, it occasionally seemed awkward.

Most of the movie showed hints of Wing Chun, but the movie really has only two extended fight sequences. In the first, the school goes to battle with a rival establishment. The confrontation is so corny, though, it might have come out of "Happy Days" with its unconvincing dialogue and tough guy posturing. The battle with the crime lord and his minions is staged better, but still boils down to a simplistic and over-the-top "good versus evil" showdown. What's worse, though, it never really makes sense with the rest of the movie. It's as if the director thought, "I have to give them at least one big action moment" whether it fit into the gentle tone of the movie or not. In the end, "Ip Man: The Final Fight" wants to be too many things to too many people. If it had developed its supporting characters, it might have made a strong drama. As is, it's fine without being particularly distinguished. KGHarris, 9/13.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you already love IP MAN and have seen any of the other movies, don't waste your time on this one., October 29, 2013
By 
KD & CW (Georgia, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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First off, I'm a HUGE IP MAN fan. I first discovered IP MAN by accident with the first Donnie Yen film. I then had to see them all, both the Yen films and the other ones that precede this film. Some duplication across the board but all-in-all they each held their own. I was thrilled to find yet another was coming out and didn't hesitate to BUY this one instead of renting it. I'm very disappointed. There was one action scene in the whole movie that came any where near being worthy of holding the IP MAN title and the movie left me with an ill respect for IP MAN and Bruce Lee for that matter. Don't break the tribute the other films have paid to the great IP MAN and his legacy. They should have just left well enough alone. Anthony Wong did nice job as IP MAN but to me never quite embodied the spirit and spunk that was portrayed in the other films. While I respect his effort, it was unfair to expect him to reinvent the wheel in this film.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The final fight, the last gasp, but how I wish it weren't! This deserves an Oscar!, September 25, 2013
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This review is from: Ip Man Final Fight (DVD)
IP MAN: THE FINAL FIGHT (Orig. title "Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin" ("IP MAN: THE MASTER'S FINALE"), a/k/a IP MAN 4, a/k/a IP MAN 4: THE FINAL FIGHT, Dir. Herman Yau, 2013, 102 minutes, Cantonese with English subtitles). ~ Firstly, please note this film is a remake of Ip Man 2 but don't allow that to put you off ... please!

When I first reviewed this excellent film, I was a bit tough on it. That was careless. This film deserves multiple viewings and is truly an Oscar-worthy film. That cannot be said for two of the other three Ip Man films--though I think the original Donnie Yen version is also deserving of a golden guy. (Also I think IP MAN 0 was approved by the Wing Chun Association since its real-life director has a starring role in that film.)

In this version it almost seems as if the Wing Chun students and even the Association wanted a better, more accurate film portraying Master Ip as a true human being and not stiff-as-a-board Donnie Yen.

The amazing Anthony Wong Chau Sang (a/k/a Anthony Wong, a/k/a Anthony Perry), a perennial favorite of mine not least because I resemble him, hands in a spectacular performance in the title role. Wong is powerful in his stillness and skilled beyond most actors working today. His extremely beautiful smile and velvety voice really make you feel you're watching Master Ip, even though Wong bears little resemblance to Master Ip.

Like I said, Wong looks like me--and I am not surprised, since I am 1/8 Chinese and Wong is 1/2 but doesn't look it.

Wong, a six-footer whose birth name is Anthony Perry, was born and raised in Hong Kong. In spite of having an English father (sometimes claimed to be an Australian) and an obviously Caucasian appearance resembling Anthony Quinn, Wong has played some venomous, villainous weirdoes.

Westerners will recognize him only vaguely because here he is older than I remember him. As many do, I recall him as a slender, black-haired musician--one of his many talents. Wong loves to work with Director Yau, who also directed Ip Man 3 "The Legend Is Born" 2010 (see my review).

With little effort, he has given genuine onscreen life to the enigmatic Master Ip. This film runs its course from around 1950 until approximately 1969--it is not only the year 1950 as has been inaccurately stated over and over. This starts with Master Ip arriving in Hong Kong, and if you know IP MAN 2, then you already know the basic story outline. Only this version is better--and seems utterly unrelated to the production company of the original two films.

It must be pointed out, this film is absolutely the best of the lot as a Ip Man biography. Anthony Wong breathes powerful life into this flawed, ordinary human who happened to be a grandmaster. We see Master Ip with his wife--whom he adored--and we see him later, collapsing in the street from the shock of her death.

We see him fall in love with a pretty young girl who may be a prostitute (it is hinted but never addressed). We see him ill, lose his temper, lose a fight or two, we see him enjoying his food when his chronic stomach pain allowed him to.

That is a well-rounded portrayal of a martial arts master (masters are only well-educated humans, not superhumans) and I defy anyone to name a film that does the job like this film--and Wong deserves an Oscar for best foreign actor, but I doubt we have an Oscar for that.

Here, all is realism, no stylized nonsense or big-money cinematic shots (well, the swoop over Hong Kong at the beginning is cinematically 'big'). The classic shots are of Master Ip fighting or Master Ip teaching his beloved students. Though a few silly derailments make the film a bit boring at moments, I find it perfectly easy to cope. And may I say, this is pretty close to being a family film too.

The bird's-eye view swooping-shot of 1949 Hong Kong and surrounding countryside looks funny because it is shot exactly as it was made: a table-top model. For all that it is a fascinating "1980s HBO" cityscape--but I LOVED the seamless way it honed in on the street in that one speedy swoop-shot, right onto Master Ip who is just arrived. After all the viewings, I still can't fathom how they did that so seamlessly: from a table-top model to the opening street scene.

Take THAT, ya lousy Man of Tai Chi (Watch Now Before It's in Theaters)!

Troubles with the film: the narration starts by Ip Ching, Master Ip's oldest son. However, he suddenly stops narrating and one of Master Ip's students takes over--the audience is unaware of this even though the narrators 'introduce' themselves (too subtly, I think).

Two-thirds of the way in, the student abruptly goes silent and the narration is once again taken up by Ip Ching. The horrible subtitles don't help--but I would expect a better English dubbing with the DVD. Trouble here is the English dubbing is obviously performed by very young Chinese actors. The kid who dubs the voice for Anthony Perry sounds like he barely made it into college!

And by the way, Master Ip's younger son Grandmaster Ip Chun, who also appears in this film (he was introduced as Grandmaster Leung Bik in IP MAN 0), is ignored totally in the story since he's away at college. Aside from poking fun at the whole martial arts genre, this is the film's way of apologizing for NOT having Grandmaster Ip Chun appear in it--but as I said, the real-life Grandmaster does make a cameo as Master Ip Man's landlord.

You'll love this movie, especially if you recognize the remakes of every scene of IP MAN 2. The relationship this shows between Master Ip and Master Hong (subtitled as "Master Ng") is moving and lovely. As I said, the entire film concentrates on Master Ip's relationship to everyone, including a tense, bitter little reunion with Bruce Lee toward the end. I highly approve of this film's making: I'd been anticipating it since the last Ip Man film and was stunned to see Herman Yau would once again helm the direction.

Well, here they did everyone proud. After Donnie Yen's second performance in IP MAN 2, I really thought that was going to be it. The whole thing made me ache to see a better overall film, and THIS IS IT! Watch for the major, tear-inducing surprise at the end of the film.

Finally, as a companion I recommend you read the biography of Master Ip written by his son Ip Ching, who is portrayed so well in this film: Ip Man - Portrait of a Kung Fu Master (see my review). I hope Sister Wu Mei looks down upon this from Heaven with a smile.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More about Drama Than about Action, December 4, 2013
By 
Tsuyoshi (Kyoto, Japan) - See all my reviews
As he title says, “Ip Man: The Final Fight” (“Ip Man: Jung gik yat jin”) chronicles the last days of the legendary martial artist (whose students included an international star Bruce Lee), but don’t expect intense combat scenes that you have seen in other “Ip Man”-related movies, especially those starring Donnie Yen. Set in post-war Hong Kong, “The Final Fight” is basically a drama about this iconic figure Ip Man (played here by Anthony Wong) with a few respectable martial arts sequences.

Directed by prolific Hong Kong filmmaker Herman Yau (known for “Untold Story” starring Anthony Wong), “The Final Fight” has an impressive cast including Gillian Chung, Jordan Chan, Eric Tsang, Anita Yuen, Zhou Chuchu, Xin Xin Xiong and Ip Chun (Ip Man’s real-life son), as well as nice production design re-creating the 1950s Hong Kong streets, but as a drama it lacks focus and emotional impact.

Anita Yuen is impressive as Ip Man’s wife, but her screen time is too short. The Wing Chun grandmaster’s brief “reunion” scene with Bruce Lee (though his name is not named) is at best cursory. Actor / martial artist Xin Xin Xiong, who was memorable as an assassin in Benny Chan’s “Shaolin,” is wasted.

“The Final Fight” sets out to be a blend of bio-pic and action film that is more about Ip Man as an aging grandmaster than as a fierce fighter. The idea is interesting but fails, although Anthony Wong delivers an authentic performance, which deserved a better script.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The final fight, the last gasp, but how I wish it weren't! This deserves an Oscar!, September 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
IP MAN: THE FINAL FIGHT (Orig. title "Yip Man: Jung gik yat jin" ("IP MAN: THE MASTER'S FINALE"), a/k/a IP MAN 4, a/k/a IP MAN 4: THE FINAL FIGHT, Dir. Herman Yau, 2013, 102 minutes, Cantonese with English subtitles). ~ Firstly, please note this film is a remake of Ip Man 2 but don't allow that to put you off ... please!

When I first reviewed this excellent film, I was a bit tough on it. That was careless. This film deserves multiple viewings and is truly an Oscar-worthy film. That cannot be said for two of the other three Ip Man films--though I think the original Donnie Yen version is also deserving of a golden guy. (Also I think IP MAN 0 was approved by the Wing Chun Association since its real-life director has a starring role in that film.)

In this version it almost seems as if the Wing Chun students and even the Association wanted a better, more accurate film portraying Master Ip as a true human being and not stiff-as-a-board Donnie Yen.

The amazing Anthony Wong Chau Sang (a/k/a Anthony Wong, a/k/a Anthony Perry), a perennial favorite of mine not least because I resemble him, hands in a spectacular performance in the title role. Wong is powerful in his stillness and skilled beyond most actors working today. His extremely beautiful smile and velvety voice really make you feel you're watching Master Ip, even though Wong bears little resemblance to Master Ip.

Like I said, Wong looks like me--and I am not surprised, since I am 1/8 Chinese and Wong is 1/2 but doesn't look it.

Wong, a six-footer whose birth name is Anthony Perry, was born and raised in Hong Kong. In spite of having an English father (sometimes claimed to be an Australian) and an obviously Caucasian appearance resembling Anthony Quinn, Wong has played some venomous, villainous weirdoes.

Westerners will recognize him only vaguely because here he is older than I remember him. As many do, I recall him as a slender, black-haired musician--one of his many talents. Wong loves to work with Director Yau, who also directed Ip Man 3 "The Legend Is Born" 2010 (see my review).

With little effort, he has given genuine onscreen life to the enigmatic Master Ip. This film runs its course from around 1950 until approximately 1969--it is not only the year 1950 as has been inaccurately stated over and over. This starts with Master Ip arriving in Hong Kong, and if you know IP MAN 2, then you already know the basic story outline. Only this version is better--and seems utterly unrelated to the production company of the original two films.

It must be pointed out, this film is absolutely the best of the lot as a Ip Man biography. Anthony Wong breathes powerful life into this flawed, ordinary human who happened to be a grandmaster. We see Master Ip with his wife--whom he adored--and we see him later, collapsing in the street from the shock of her death.

We see him fall in love with a pretty young girl who may be a prostitute (it is hinted but never addressed). We see him ill, lose his temper, lose a fight or two, we see him enjoying his food when his chronic stomach pain allowed him to.

That is a well-rounded portrayal of a martial arts master (masters are only well-educated humans, not superhumans) and I defy anyone to name a film that does the job like this film--and Wong deserves an Oscar for best foreign actor, but I doubt we have an Oscar for that.

Here, all is realism, no stylized nonsense or big-money cinematic shots (well, the swoop over Hong Kong at the beginning is cinematically 'big'). The classic shots are of Master Ip fighting or Master Ip teaching his beloved students. Though a few silly derailments make the film a bit boring at moments, I find it perfectly easy to cope. And may I say, this is pretty close to being a family film too.

The bird's-eye view swooping-shot of 1949 Hong Kong and surrounding countryside looks funny because it is shot exactly as it was made: a table-top model. For all that it is a fascinating "1980s HBO" cityscape--but I LOVED the seamless way it honed in on the street in that one speedy swoop-shot, right onto Master Ip who is just arrived. After all the viewings, I still can't fathom how they did that so seamlessly: from a table-top model to the opening street scene.

Take THAT, ya lousy Man of Tai Chi (Watch Now Before It's in Theaters)!

Troubles with the film: the narration starts by Ip Ching, Master Ip's oldest son. However, he suddenly stops narrating and one of Master Ip's students takes over--the audience is unaware of this even though the narrators 'introduce' themselves (too subtly, I think).

Two-thirds of the way in, the student abruptly goes silent and the narration is once again taken up by Ip Ching. The horrible subtitles don't help--but I would expect a better English dubbing with the DVD. Trouble here is the English dubbing is obviously performed by very young Chinese actors. The kid who dubs the voice for Anthony Perry sounds like he barely made it into college!

And by the way, Master Ip's younger son Grandmaster Ip Chun, who also appears in this film (he was introduced as Grandmaster Leung Bik in IP MAN 0), is ignored totally in the story since he's away at college. Aside from poking fun at the whole martial arts genre, this is the film's way of apologizing for NOT having Grandmaster Ip Chun appear in it--but as I said, the real-life Grandmaster does make a cameo as Master Ip Man's landlord.

You'll love this movie, especially if you recognize the remakes of every scene of IP MAN 2. The relationship this shows between Master Ip and Master Hong (subtitled as "Master Ng") is moving and lovely. As I said, the entire film concentrates on Master Ip's relationship to everyone, including a tense, bitter little reunion with Bruce Lee toward the end. I highly approve of this film's making: I'd been anticipating it since the last Ip Man film and was stunned to see Herman Yau would once again helm the direction.

Well, here they did everyone proud. After Donnie Yen's second performance in IP MAN 2, I really thought that was going to be it. The whole thing made me ache to see a better overall film, and THIS IS IT! Watch for the major, tear-inducing surprise at the end of the film.

Finally, as a companion I recommend you read the biography of Master Ip written by his son Ip Ching, who is portrayed so well in this film: Ip Man - Portrait of a Kung Fu Master (see my review). I hope Sister Wu Mei looks down upon this from Heaven with a smile.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good 3rd movie, September 19, 2013
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Tis is part three f the saga. While not quite at the level of the first two, the martial arts are excellent.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It is a filler until Donnie Yen comes, August 24, 2013
This IS NOT a sequl to the IP Man 1 and 2 this is simple a spin off. He never did anything like this in his life as I am direct lineage of Yip and Donnie Yen and his best friend producer for 1 and 2 were having problems with the director but filming for YIP Man 3 is in progress.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movie, well done!, October 16, 2013
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I like all the Ip Man movies. I was an avid Bruce Lee fan, and anything to do with him is of interest to me. I like well done martial arts movies, not so much the more fantastic ones of fighters suddenly jumping backwards 50 or 60 feet in the air and landing in a tree to save themselves or whatever. The real fight scenes I do love. Bruce Lee was the greatest in portraying the martial arts, and the Ip Man movies follow that. They let him be a real person who does real fight scenes and left the fantasy to the rest. Good movie, well done.
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Ip Man: The Final Fight
Ip Man: The Final Fight by Herman Yau (DVD - 2013)
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