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Iran Awakening: One Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Life and Country Paperback – April 10, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (April 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812975286
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812975284
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #304,935 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The safety and freedom of citizens in democracies is irretrievably bound with the safety and freedom of people like Shirin Ebadi who are fighting to reassert the best achievements of mankind: universal human rights. One of the staunchest advocates for human rights in her country and beyond, Ms. Ebadi, herself a devout Muslim, represents hope for many in Muslim societies that Islam and democracy are indeed compatible."
—Azar Nafisi

"This is the riveting story of an amazing and very brave woman living through some quite turbulent times. And she emerges with head unbowed."
—Archbishop Desmond Tutu


From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Shirin Ebadi is one of the leading human rights activists in the world. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003. She continues to work as a lawyer in Tehran while also lecturing widely around the world.


From the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Azadeh Moaveni grew up in San Jose and studied politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She won a Fulbright fellowship to Egypt, and studied Arabic at the American University in Cairo. For three years she worked across the Middle East as a reporter for Time Magazine, before joining the Los Angeles Times to cover the Iraq war. She is the co-writer of Iranian Nobel peace laureate Shirin Ebadi's memoir, Iran Awakening: A Memoir of Revolution and Hope (Random House: May 2006). She is now a contributing writer on Islamic affairs to Time Magazine. She lives in Tehran.

Customer Reviews

The book is a quick read (219 pages) that leaves a lasting imprint.
Anna
Ms. Ebadi crafts a compelling autobiography that draws the reader in like a novel.
J. Wayland Eheart
It is a beautiful story of a Iranian woman's journey after the revolution in Iran.
Jane Austen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. Wayland Eheart on August 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ms. Ebadi crafts a compelling autobiography that draws the reader in like a novel. She brings us into the center of her experiences without crowing or being sanctimonious. In telling her own story, she also manages, in a fairly short book to present what I think is an objective history of Iran starting just prior to the 1953 coup and ending at the present.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By P. Saunders on September 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is the best and the most honest version of the modern history of my country from the eyes of a brave educated woman who is not afraid to fight for what every one else is afraid to whisper. In her memoir, she does not leave out any detail of the atmosphere governing Iran. Living in the circumstances she describes in the book, I genuinely respect her for who she is. She is an icon every woman can look up to and That is why she is a Nobel prize winner. She has a story telling gift, making the book absolutely attractive and easy to follow. This book is a must read; she risked her life writing it and it needs audience: Iranian women and children need Shirin Ebadi and people who think like her. This is an outstanding book, unforgettable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Thomas E. Parker on November 28, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have a Ph.D. in Religious Studies and have found this book to be illuminating about Iranian history from the early 1950's to the present. This covers some very crucial Iranian-American history that both countries need to acknowledge. I can't help but envision a series of meetings between the heads of both countries with Shirin Ebadi present to facilitate and urge both sides towards confession and reconciliation. I don't know how our two countries can possibly talk with each other productively until this mutual history is acknowledged and embraced in all its troublesome detail. Of course this book is a wonderful portrait of a courageous and determined woman who risks everything in the name of human rights and is awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts. As 2012 moves towards 2013, and as we settle into 4 more years with our newly elected president, and as there's all this sword rattling between America and Iran (with Israel a focal point of it all), this book can inject some reality and sanity into the situation. I think this book is a more important read at this historical moment than when it was first published a few years ago. Please read this and consider.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Monika Lange on October 19, 2007
Format: Paperback
An excellent and honest if horrifying picture of today's Iran. I found Ms. Ebadi's book as fascinating as Hillary Clinton's. An extremely smart and brave woman, Ms. Ebadi clearly loves her country and is ready to sacrifice her life for Iran. I was happy to read about the few improvements in the lives of ordinary citizens as well as changes in women's education in the Islamic republic, but it pained me to read about the human rights violations, the killings, and the tortures used by the mullahs on their own people. I spent 7 years in Iran before, during and after the revolution and left when Iraq threatened to bobmb Tehran. I loved Iran, its ancient history, beautiful poetry, and lovely countryside. But most of all I loved its friendly, hospitable, and talented people and to read that the nation's suffering wasn't over was very hard for me. However, it made me happy and proud to know that Iran, once more, produced a gem, and this time it was a woman, who despite the terror of the Islamic republic was
able to make her voice heard in the world and received a Nobel price!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By D. Baskin on June 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
I love books like these ... ones where you can read an interesting story while learning so much about the history of a country (the Bookseller of Kabul and Wild Swan are similar). I didn't know much about Iran before this book and now I feel I have a basic understanding of their history since about 1950. I also find it fascinating to know why other countries may not like America and how our history intertwines. I really loved her story and found it inspiring. I wish I knew a way to help ... so instead I just send my good wishes for both her and her country.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gary A. Backlund on July 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book does a good job of letting the reader "behind the scenes", from a women's prespective, as Iran transitions from the Shah to cleric rule. In addition, it discusses the struggles of daily life for Iranian citizens. Anyone interested in view not generally seen in Western news, would enjoy this book. The author is a Noble Peace Prize winner who has since been forced out of Iran and is living in Canada. I throughly enjoyed this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anna on December 3, 2007
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This was a very honest and insightful view into the hope and horrors of the people of Iran, as they transitioned from a dictatorial Shah to a dictatoral Cleric form of government. In the end, it's the people who suffer. Shirin Ebadi's story is very compelling. The book is a quick read (219 pages) that leaves a lasting imprint.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Holley on June 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is one of my most favorite books. I devoured it. I could not wait to find a moment to read it and then read it well past my bed time. The story line is of the life of an ambitious and thoughtful woman in Iran - starting in her youth during the Shah's reign, then a young professional during the revolution of 1978 and finally as a courageous adult raising her family and pursuing her commitment to justice as a lawyer in contemporary times. But the novel, which is very well written, covers so much more ground. Ebadi's reflections on life and human nature and politics and the plight of the poor and Shia Islam and its many interpretations, the Iran-Iraq war, courage, faith, her struggle against the trend to leave Iran, are just so provocative. I learned so much and was so moved and captivated by her story telling ability. I wish that all Americans could read this book so that they would have a window into the real life of Iran, the joys and the struggles, as well as a better idea of the history - especially pre-1978. My hope is that if more americans understand the subversive role that the united states played in Iran - as well as in many other countries - in the 50s, 60s and 70s we would have a better understanding of our brothers and sisters there. While I think Ebadi's book shares my desire to enlighten western readers this is just one of the many points she makes. All together, it is a wonderful book!!!
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